Tag Archives: Martin Parr

Remixed, a New Take on Aperture Classics

Throughout its 60-year history Aperture has never turned away from its hallmarks: an abiding respect for photography as an artistic medium and a tireless encouragement of the free exchange of ideas. From its founding in 1952 through the present, the foundation has always attracted the leading image-makers of the day, and it is only fitting this anniversary serve as a time to reflect on the past. In the celebratory exhibitionAperture Remix, this instinct towards nostalgia is focused on a reflection of photographic influence.

Curator Lesley Martin invited ten contemporary photographers to look back on past Aperture publications, choose a personally influential example and pay artistic homage through appropriation and modification. Martin went to great lengths to select artists explaining, I was looking at a range of people who could represent the directions that photography is moving in now, the way documentary is shifting, and the way digital is being incorporated into photographic practice.

The diversity is apparent, and artists selected span both space and time. Japanese artist Rinko Kawauchi drew inspiration from American photographer’s Sally MannsImmediate Family,created more than a continent away. Meanwhile,Alec Soth selected Robert AdamsSummer Nights, which he reinterpreted into a video, Summer Nights at the Dollar Tree, 2012. When explaining his reasoning for working with Robert Adams past publication he says, Over time, you begin to understand influences and the nuances of what makes your own work different.The other artists commissioned to create work include Vik Muniz, Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs, Martin Parr, Viviane Sassen, Penelope Umbrico, James Welling and Doug Rickard, who chose to remix Stephen Shore’s Uncommon Places.

While the initial assignment could be read as encouraging passive appropriation, Rickards approach to Stephen ShoresUncommon Placesis an example of how remixing encouraged unexpected results. Instead of physically intervening with the publication, Rickard decided to analyze the influences that affected it to create his expansive homage. After reading several interviews and text on Shores work, Rickard honed in on postcards as a source of inspiration forUncommon Placesthrough their unique and plain depictions of America. Reminiscent of the great American road trip, Rickard took a digital road trip on eBay to scavenge hundreds of thousands of postcards for his re-imagining. From this wide edit he narrowed down to a smaller set of candidates he felt had the appropriate ingredients that would yield imagery most reminiscent of the original 8 x 10 photographs in Shores publication.

I spent hundreds of hours doing it because his book is so iconic, and I felt homages or anything that is connected to something iconic is always tricky,” Rickard says. “It was important that I did something that was worthyand fitting of this era toowhich is the digital era.

Although the outcomes are decidedly mixed, the assignment uniformly challenged each artist to wrestle through the issue of influence. In an age of image abundance, it may seem easier to ignore icons for fear of looming too close to previous conceptsbut to process and pay tribute is equally demanding. The moral of the story could be dont try anything ever, but figuring out how strong each contributing artists voice is within all their layers of consideration is what makesAperture Remixsuch an engaging exhibition.

Aperture Remix is on view at Aperture Gallery in New York from Oct. 17Nov. blog comment . 17. See more informationhere.

Ewen Spencer, April Pearson, “Skins”

Ewen Spencer, April Pearson, “Skins”

Ewen Spencer

April Pearson, “Skins”,
Watford, England, 2006
Website – EwenSpencer.com

In the late 1990’s Ewen Spencer's groundbreaking editorial for The Face & Sleazenation immediately spoke to an audience interested in subcultures, multiculturalism, music, graphic art, photography, fashion and youth culture. In 2001 Ewen embarked upon a project called Teenagers documenting British adolescents as they come to terms with socialising, dating and sex. His signature flash style became synonymous with a close aspect to his subjects. In 2002 Martin Parr tipped him as the most promising newcomer of that year. In 2004 London’s burgeoning grime scene allowed him access to make photographs during open mic session in and around London. His book Open Mic is one of the best examples of Ewen’s work to date. 

Photo News – John Stezaker wins Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2012

John Stezaker (b.1949, UK) has been awarded the 2012 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize at a special ceremony in The Photographers’ Gallery on Monday 3 September 2012. The £30,000 award was presented by artist and 2003 winner of the Prize, Juergen Teller. Photos from the award ceremony to come tomorrow as I am working on the fly but wanted to post this asap. I posted on the fly while out and about on Monday evening and it was saved to drafts and not published. So here it is, a little later than planned, but heh – that’s life.

The Prize is awarded to a photographer of any nationality for their significant contribution to the medium of photography either through an exhibition or publication, in Europe between 1 October 2010 and 30 September 2011. John Stezaker won for his exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery, London, UK (29 January – 18 March 2011).

Stezaker’s collages examine our multifaceted relationship to the image. Through his juxtapositions of found photographs, illustrations and stills taken from books, magazines, vintage postcards and classic movies, Stezaker adopts the content and contexts of the original images to create new and poignant meanings. John Stezaker was chosen by jury members: François Hébel, Director, Les Rencontres d’Arles; Martin Parr, artist; Beatrix Ruf, Director/Curator, Kunsthalle Zürich; and Anne-Marie Beckmann, Curator, Art Collection Deutsche Börse, Germany. The other shortlisted artists for the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize 2012, each awarded £3,000, are: Pieter Hugo (b.1976, South Africa) for his publication Permanent Error, published by Prestel (Germany, 2011); Rinko Kawauchi (b.1972, Japan) for her publication Illuminance, published byEditions Xavier Barral (France, 2011); and Christopher Williams (b. 1956, USA) for his exhibition Kapitalistischer Realismus at Dům umění České Budějovice, Budweis, Czech Republic (5 May – 12 June 2011).

Filed under: Documentary photography, Photographers blogs, Photography Awards & Competitions, Uncategorized Tagged: Deutsche Borse award 2012, John Stezaker, london, Photo award, photo collage, The Photographers’ Gallery

Interviews and Talks | August 2012

Stephanie Sinclair (CNN) Interviewed about her child brides project by CNN’s Christina Amanpour

Aaron Huey (Media Bistro) ‘National Geographic’s Aaron Huey on Digital Collaboration and Community Storytelling’

Photo © Philip Blenkinsop

Gary Knight (FotoEvidence)

Andre Liohn (YouTube) The Robert Capa Gold Medal award speech

Michael Kamber (NYT Lens) on Witnessess to War book

David Turnley (CNN) ‘New doc ‘Shenandoah’ tells story of undocumented immigrant killed by teens’

Don McCullin (BBC) Desert Island Discs 1984

Photo © Alexandra Avakian

Jean-Francois Leroy (BJP) Visa pour l’Image director Jean-Francois Leroy interviewed by our very own Olivier Laurent!

Luke Sharrett (Photo Brigade) ‘Traveling Aboard Air Force One’

Luke Sharrett (PDN) “The College Kid Whose Obama Photo Landed in The New Yorker”

James Estrin (burn)

The Bystanders: photographers who didn’t step in to help (Guardian) “What’s it like to witness a mob attack, a starving child or the aftermath of a bomb, and take a photograph instead of stopping to help? As two journalists are under fire for recording rather than intervening in a sex attack in India, we ask people who know”

Lauren Greenfield  (Phoenix.com) on The Queen of Versailles

Photo © Martin Parr

Martin Parr (Ideas Tap) Parr on Abstract painting with abstract shirt

Steve McCurry (Ideas Tap ) McCurry on ‘Dust Storm, Rajasthan, India’

Alex Webb (PDN) Webb on His Creative Process, Kodachrome, and Magnum

Stanley Greene (PDN) Greene on Luck, Film and Supporting Young Photographers

Photo © Moises Saman

Moises Saman, Mark Power and Stuart Franklin (IdeasTap)  ’Magnum photographers on their craft ‘

Edward Burtynsky (Metro)  Burtynsky: “Photographers’ Gallery will be an exciting new space”

Robin Hammond (nzherald.co.nz) ‘The Zimbabwe Mugabe didn’t want you to see’

Jacob Aue Sobol : Arrivals and Departures pt6 (Leica blog)

Josef Koudelka (Vogue.it)

Jodi Bieber (Ted.com)

Tewfic El-Sawy (Auto de Fe)

Lucas Foglia (Guardian) ‘photographer in search of off-the-grid Americans’

Mark Seliger in conversation with Platon and Dylan McDermott (Capture: episode 1 on YouTube)

Jonathan Torgovnik (FK Magazine)

John Cantlie (DailyBeast) “Journalist John Cantlie Learned How Deadly Syria Can Be When He Was Held Hostage by Jihadis”

John Cantlie (Channel 4 News) Cantlie about having been held captive in Syria

Bruce Gilden (Magnum Photos blog)

Jonas Bendiksen (Leica Vimeo)

Photo © Kate Peters

Kate Peters (Hasselblad blog) ‘Kate Peters and her trusty Hasselblad have just completed a marathon project to photograph an impressive line up of Olympic hopefuls for a huge spread in The Guardian’s Weekend supplement.’

Al Bello (NYT) ‘To Get the Shot, Nerve, Luck and Scuba Gear’

Doug Mills (NYT Lens) ‘Photographing the Olympics: The 400-Millimeter Dash’

Tony Hicks, AP’s regional photo editor for Europe and Africa (AP) Men’s 100m final “As well as 18 photographers, AP had 20 remote cameras placed in every imaginable shooting position.”

Photo © David Burnett / Contact Press Images

David Burnett (NYT Lens) ‘An Olympic Photographer’s Endurance’

Gregory Bull (Youtube) ‘AP Photographer Gregory Bull shot one of the iconic images of the London Games Thursday. He explains how he got that magical shot of Olympic gold medalist Gabby Douglas high over the balance beam.’

Jonathan Klein (CNN video posted on Photo Archive News) ‘Getty Images CEO Jonathan Klein on Getty’s involvement in London 2012′

Photos © Martin Schoeller

Martin Schoeller (BBC) “Photographer Martin Schoeller searches for the unique in identical twins”

Kate Holt (Action Aid)

Gareth Cattermole (YouTube) “Gareth Cattermole is a Getty Images staff entertainment photographer”

Palani Mohan (Asia Society) ‘Photographer Documents Rugged Lives of Kazakh Eagle Hunters’

Ewen Spencer (We Heart)

Chloe Dewe Mathews (Picture Perfect  | Vice.com)

Diver and Aguilar (A Photo Editor)

Sean Hemmerle (PDN) ‘How Sean Hemmerle Photographed Drones’

WassinkLundgren (Unseen Amsterdam)

Stephen Wilkes (A Photo Editor)

Photo © Martin Roemers

Martin Roemers (theurbn.com)

Chris Gregory (NYT Lens)

Newsha Tavakolian (Leica blog)

Brent Lewin (Boreal Collective)

James Noble (Guardian) ‘Tetra Pak heir: how photographer snapped key shots’

Steve Giralt (Photographer’s blog)  ’The Best Photography Course I Ever Took’

Richard Koci Hernandez (LA Times Framework blog)

The World in London

This summer, the world descends on London for the Olympic Games.  A photo project commissioned by the Photographer’s Gallery, however, shows us that the world is already there.  “The World in London” is a collection of 204 portraits of 204 Londoners, each of whom hail from one of the 204 countries competing in this year’s Games. Since each portrait was carried out by a different photographer, the style of the work is as diverse as its subjects: formal studio portraits, Skype screengrabs, and casual snapshots, by established artists and emerging talents, all make their way into the collection.  The resulting work is a portrait of both human and artistic diversity, showcasing one of the world’s most international cities through the lenses of some of its most creative photographers.  See photographs by Martin Parr, Stephen Shore, Rinko Kawauchi, Penelope Umbrico and 200 others at The World in London.

Martin Parr: Picturing the American South

The High Museum of Art commissioned Martin Parr to document Atlanta as part of its Picturing the South project—a series of artist commissions that engage with the American South. Channeling his unparalleled ability to collate humor, wit, and curiosity into his heavily socio-cultural photographs, Parr captured the oddities and eccentricities of contemporary Americana.

British-born Parr, whose photography career spans over 30 years, is known for his provocative documentary style by using cultural criticism through an exaggerated and humorous light. His analysis of how we live is not simply satire, as Parr offers his audience an approach to seeing which acts not to denounce, but to highlight (both aesthetically and thematically) patterns between people, the things we consume and the milieus in which we live.

The outcome of the museum’s commission offers a vivid, comedic and touching perspective on the diversity that lies in Atlanta. Parr covers a large body of subject matter in his findings, which ranges from the high and low—juxtaposing images from a gallery opening to an oddly lengthy corn dog on a stick. Parr’s images offer insight which would only be found through the lens of a meticulous and curious outsider.

Beyond the exhibition at the High Museum of Art, Italian publisher Contrasto released a book, Up and Down Peachtree: Photographs of Atlantaand a documetary, Hot Spots: Martin Parr in the American South. The book, a meticulously edited and impeccably designed object in its own right, is printed without text beyond the book’s title and colophon—which, undeniably, is a testament to Parr’s talent for storytelling. The documentary is a 60-minute lens behind the lens where documentarian Neal Broffman followed Parr photographing around Atlanta. The documentary includes interviews with noted curators, writers, critics and photographers, and offers a look into at Parr’s real-life affable personality and interactions with his subjects. Below, Contrasto has given LightBox an exclusive clip on the documentary:

Martin Parr’s photographs are on view now through September 9, 2012, as part of Picturing the South: New Commissions from the High Museum of Art. Up and Down Peachtree and Hot Spots: Martin Parr in the American South are both available for purchase online.

Aperture Announces its Fall 2012 Releases

For Fall 2012 Aperture presents a list of new and re-issued publications, from the startling and fresh, to new editions and long-awaited anthologies. Read more about our upcoming releases, and view a slideshow of Fall 2012 cover art below.

Upcoming titles include:

A New American Picture by Doug Rickard
101 Tragedies of Enrique Metinides
Petrochemical America by Richard Misrach and Kate Orff
The Ballad of Sexual Dependency by Nan Goldin
Life’s a Beach by Martin Parr
Labyrinth: Daido Moriyama
Aperture Magazine Anthology: The Minor White Years, 1952–1976
The Garden at Orgeval by Paul Strand
• Unbuilt: Louis I. Kahn at Roosevelt Island, Photographs by Barney Kulok, Essay by Steven Holl

Rickard_Cover

Metinides_Cover

Petrochemical_America_Cover

Ballad_Cover

LON92759

Moriyama_Cover

Anthology_Cover

Strand_Cover

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September 2012

A New American Picture by Doug Rickard


Doug Rickard’s A New American Picture offers a startling and fresh perspective on American street photography. While on first glance the work looks reassuringly familiar and well within the traditional bounds of the genre, his methodology is anything but conventional. All of the images are appropriated from Google Street View; over a period of two years, Rickard took advantage of the technology platform’s comprehensive image archive to virtually drive the unseen and overlooked roads of America, bleak places that are forgotten, economically devastated, and abandoned. With an informed and deliberate eye, Rickard finds and decodes these previously photographed scenes of urban and rural decay. He rephotographs the machine-made images as they appear on his computer screen, framing and freeing them from their technological origins.

12 1/2 x 9 3/4 in. (31.8 x 24.8 cm); 
144 pages, 90 four-color images; 
Hardcover with jacket; 
ISBN 978-1-59711-219-2
; $60.00; 
September 2012; 
Rights: North America


101 Tragedies of Enrique
 Metinides


101 Tragedies of Enrique Metinides is Enrique Metinides’ choice of the 101 key images from his life photographing crime scenes and accidents in Mexico for local newspapers and the nota roja (or “red pages,” for their bloody content) crime press. Accompanying each image, extended captions give his account of the situation depicted, describing the characters and life of the streets, the sadness of families, the criminals, and the heroism of emergency workers—revealing much about himself in the process. Having received his first camera at the age of ten, Metinides became a capable street photographer by the time he was twelve, already working with police and firefighters to get his best shots. Now also found in museum collections around the world, his images are compelling, immediate, sometimes shocking, and always authentic. Selected photographs are also paired with their original newsprint tearsheets, collected by Metinides, the typography of which have inspired the design of this book. The photographs have been compiled by Trisha Ziff, a filmmaker and curator who knows Metinides well, and who also contributes an essay about his life, work, and personality.

8 1/2 x 10 3/8 in. (21.6 x 26.4 cm); 
192 pages, 
150 four-color images; 
Hardcover with jacket; 
ISBN 978-1-59711-211-6
; $50.00/£35.00
; September 2012; 
Rights: World


Petrochemical America
by Richard Misrach and Kate Orff


Petrochemical America features Richard Misrach’s haunting photographic record of Louisiana’s Chemical Corridor, accompanied by landscape architect Kate Orff’s Ecological Atlas—a series of “speculative drawings” developed through research and mapping of data from the region. Their joint effort depicts and unpacks the complex cultural, physical, and economic ecologies along 150 miles of the Mississippi River, from Baton Rouge to New Orleans, an area of intense chemical production that first garnered public attention as “Cancer Alley” when unusual occurrences of cancer were discovered in the region.

This collaboration has resulted in an unprecedented, multilayered document presenting a unique narrative of visual information. Petrochemical America offers in-depth analysis of the causes of decades of environmental abuse along the largest river system in North America. Even more critically, the project offers an extensively researched guidebook to the way in which the petrochemical industry has permeated every facet of contemporary life.

 An exhibition coinciding with the release of the book will take place at Aperture Gallery in fall 2012.

13 1/2 x 10 1/2 in. (34.3 x 26.7 cm); 216 pages (plus 24-page insert), 
150 four-color images; Hardcover; ISBN 978-1-59711-191-1; $80.00/£50.00; September 2012; 
Rights: World


The Ballad of Sexual 
Dependency
by Nan Goldin


The Ballad of Sexual Dependency is a visual diary chronicling the struggle for intimacy and understanding between friends, family, and lovers—collectively described by Nan Goldin as her “tribe.” Her work describes a world that is visceral, charged, and seething with life. First published in 1986, this reissue recognizes the persistent relevance and freshness of Nan Goldin’s cutting-edge photography.

Over the past twenty-five years, the influence of Ballad on photography and other aesthetic realms has continually grown, making the work a contemporary classic. Nan Goldin’s story of urban life on the fringe was the swan song of an era that reached its peak in the early eighties. Yet it has captured an important element of humanity that is transcendent: a need to connect.

This new edition of The Ballad of Sexual Dependency has been printed using new scans and separations created by master-separator Robert Hennessey from Goldin’s original slides and transparencies, rendering them with unparalleled sumptuousness and impact.

10 x 9 in. (25.4 x 22.9 cm); 
148 pages, 
126 four-color images; 
Clothbound with jacket
; ISBN 978-1-59711-208-6; 
$50.00/£35.00; 
September 2012; 
Rights: World (excluding France)


Life’s a Beach
by Martin Parr


In the United Kingdom, one is never more than seventy-five miles away from the coast. With this much shoreline, it’s not surprising that there is a strong British tradition of photography by the seaside. American photographers may have given birth to street photography, but according to photographer Martin Parr, “in the UK, we have the beach!” Here, he asserts, people can relax, be themselves, and show off all those traces of mildly eccentric British behavior.

First released in a signed and numbered limited-edition run, Life’s a Beach shows Parr at its best, startling us with the moments of captured absurdity and immersing us in the rituals and traditions associated with beach life all over the world. A trade edition will follow in spring 2013.

11 x 9 in. (27.9 x 22.9 cm); 
98 four-color images;
 Slipcased hardcover; 
Signed and numbered limited-edition;
 ISBN 978-1-59711-224-6; 
$150.00/£95.00;
 September 2012;
 Rights: World (excluding France)


October 2012

Labyrinth: Daido Moriyama


Throughout Daido Moriyama’s extensive career, he has continually sought new ways of presenting and recontextualizing his work, frequently recasting his images through the use of different printing techniques, installation, or re-editing and re-formatting. In each iteration, images both old and new take on changed and newly charged significance. This volume, created during preparations for several international survey exhibitions, offers both the photographer and the viewer the opportunity to consider the photographer’s life work in a fresh light.

Moriyama has always sought meaning in the raw accumulation and gestalt of sequences of images. Labyrinth makes public an exercise in reconsideration that the photographer has assigned to himself. In opening up this private process of re-examination to a wider public, Moriyama continues to challenge the viewer and his own practice, as well as the larger mechanisms by which photography functions and creates meaning.

11 3/4 x 13 3/4 in. (30 x 35 cm); 
304 pages, 
300 duotone images; 
Paperback with flaps; 
ISBN 978-1-59711-217-8
; $80.00/£50.00; 
October 2012
 Rights: World (excluding Japan)


Aperture Magazine
 Anthology: The Minor White Years, 1952–1976


Published on the occasion of Aperture magazine’s sixtieth anniversary, this is the first anthology of Aperture magazine ever published. This long-awaited volume will provide a selection of the best critical writing from the first twenty-five years of the magazine—the period spanning the tenure of cofounder and editor Minor White.

The texts and visuals in this anthology were selected by Peter C. Bunnell, White’s protégé and an early member of the Aperture staff, who went on to become a major force in photography as an influential writer, curator, and professor. Several documents from Aperture’s founders and individual articles are reproduced in facsimile, and the book is enlivened by other distinctive elements, including a portfolio of each cover, and a selection of epigrams and editorials that appeared at the front of each issue. An extensive index of every contributor to the first twenty-five years of the magazine makes this an indispensible resource.

6 1/2 x 9 3/8 in. (16.5 x 23.8 cm); 
448 pages
, 150 four-color images;
 Hardcover with jacket; 
ISBN 978-1-59711-196-6;
$39.95/£25.00;
 October 2012
 Rights: World


The Garden at Orgeval
by Paul Strand


After a lifetime of working on a series of “collective portraits” in far-flung places such as Mexico; Ghana; Italy; Tir a’Mhurain, Scotland; and his adoptive country, France, an aging Paul Strand decided to concentrate on still lifes and the stony beauty of his own garden at Orgeval, France, as a site in which to distill his discoveries as a photographer. The work that constitutes The Garden at Orgeval is marked by close and careful study of the forms and patterns within nature—of tiny button-shaped flowers, cascading winter branches, and fierce snarls of twigs. While the images bear the same directness and precise vision that is quintessentially Strand, the work also reflects a growing metaphorical turn.

Renowned photographer Joel Meyerowitz—whose own affinity toward Strand’s Orgeval series stems from a lifetime of photographing in different genres and ultimately returning to nature as an enduring subject—has selected the photographs in the book, and he responds to them in an accompanying personal essay, reflecting on issues, including the contemplation of one’s garden, and growing old. Beautifully produced in a modest size, in the manner of a volume of poems, this book’s task is to do credit to Strand’s final work, both as an individual and as a key figure in Modernist photography.

8 x 10 3/8 in. (20.3 x 26.4 cm); 
96 pages, 
42 duotone images 
Clothbound; 
ISBN 978-1-59711-124-9; 
$45.00/£30.00; 
October 2012, Rights: World


Unbuilt: Louis I. Kahn at Roosevelt Island
(Photographs by Barney Kulok, Essay by Steven Holl)


In October 2012, Four Freedoms Park—the last design Louis I. Kahn completed before his untimely death in 1974—will open on Roosevelt Island in New York City, over forty years after its commission as a memorial to Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Barney Kulok’s black-and-white photographs of the building site function as a meditation on the materiality and formal underpinnings of Kahn’s architectural thinking. Unbuilt is at once a historical record and a multilayered visual investigation of form and the subtleties of texture—elements of fundamental importance to Kahn’s philosophies. As architect Steven Holl writes, “Kulok’s photographs free the subject matter from a literal interpretation of the site. They stand as ‘Equivalents’ to the words about material, light, and shadow that Louis Kahn often spoke.”

11 x 14 in. (27.9 x 35.5 cm); 80 pages, 40 duotone images; Hardcover with jacket; Signed and numbered limited edition of 1,000 copies; 987-1-59711-TKT-K; $TK.TK/£TK.TK; October 2012, Rights: World

For all press inquiries please contact:

Barbara Escobar
Publicity and Events Manager
212.946.7123
bescobar(at)aperture.org
publicity(at)aperture.org

 

Penelope Umbrico Photography @ FoMu, Antwerp

Photo (c) Penelope Umbrico

The photography of Penelope Umbrico is often described as offering a sort of “radical reinterpretation” of photographic practice, or shedding “a radical new light” on the medium, conceptually, formally, and in several ways between. The artist produces by means of “aesthetic and conceptual chops,” famously appropriating images found using search engines and picture sharing websites, translating the digital realm’s relentless flow of images into conceptual works of photography.

FoMu’s upcoming exhibition of this particularly new course of photographic practice places Umbrico’s work in good company. From Here On, on view June 6 through September 30 2012, features an international roster of artists who create their work with the overload of digital images they find on the internet.

“They recycle, clip and cut pictures from Google Earth, Google Street View, Facebook, Flickr, etc. Does this mean that traditional photography is dead? With this exhibition, FoMu opens the debate on issues such as copyright, authorship, privacy and the future of photography.”

From Here On
June 22 through September 30, 2012
FoMu – Photo Museum
Antwerp, Belgium

From Here On shows the work of artists such as Hans Aarsman (NL, °1951), art collective Leo Gabin (BE), Constant Dullaart (NL, °1979), Mishka Henner (UK, °1976), Thomas Mailaender (FR, °1979), Willem Popelier (NL, °1982), Doug Rickard (US, °1968), Andreas Schmidt (DE, °1967), Pavel MariaSmejkal (CZ, °1957), Penelope Umbrico (US, °1957), Corinne Vionnet (SH, °1969) and HermanZschiegner (DE, °1971).

Curators: Clément Cheroux (FR, curator at the Centre Pompidou, Paris), Joan Fontcuberta (ES, explores the conflict between nature, technology, photography and truth), Erik Kessels (NL, Creative Director communications agency KesselsKramer, Amsterdam and London), Martin Parr (UK, Magnum photographer) and Joachim Schmid (DE, has been working with found photography since 1980).
———

›› Refer to our previous Penelope Umbrico-centric stories for more information and media surrounding this artist’s body of digital work.
›› View From Here On curator and Magnum photojournalist Martin Parr in conversation with Rinko Kawauchi.
›› Buy Penelope Umbrico (Photographs) for 20% off.