Tag Archives: Marie Colvin

Awards, Grants, and Competitions | Deadlines and Recipients | September 2012

Deadlines

Lens Culture International Exposure Awards : September 18

Format Festival 2013 : September 19

Portrait Salon : September 21

Magnum Showcase in association with IdeasTap : September 24

Carmignac Gestion Photojournalism Award : September 30

Marie Colvin Scholarship opportunity at Sunday Times Magazine… NB for writers

Marie Colvin. Photo © Ivor Prickett

Marie Colvin Scholarship : September 30

BJP’s 2012 International Photography Award : October 1

Photo © Alice Smeets
Unicef Photo of The Year 2008

Unicef Photo of the Year : NB photographers have to be nominated but you can get in touch with nominators in the hope of your work being put forward to the judging panel. Some of the nominators are Sherri Dougherty, and photographers Patrick Brown and James Whitlow Delano. You can send a sample of a maximum of 15 light jpeg files (72 dpi; 1200 pixels on the longest side) for consideration in a zip file via We Transfer, to one of the three. Emails: [email protected][email protected] ;[email protected]   : October 3

College Photographer of the Year : October 7

International Prize of Humanitarian Photography Luis Valtueña : October 31

Conscientious Portfolio Competition 2012 : October 31

PhotoPhilanthropy Activist Awards : November 1

Pikto Top Pick Photo Contest : November 1

Aftermath Project grant : November 5

Prix Lucas Dolega to honor photojournalists who have reported under difficult circumstanstances in memory of photographer Lucas Dolega (1978-2011) who died in 2011 covering the Arab Spring in Tunisia.

Prix Lucas Dolega : November 15

Terry O’Neill/Tag Award 2012 : November 22

The Magnum Expression Award : February 23, 2013

The Inquisitive Photography Prize

Recipients

Stephanie Sinclair was presented with unprecedented third Visa d’Or Prize at Visa pour l’image in the beginning of September for her Child Brides project. The series was partly shot for the National Geographic… You can see the NGM feature from the June 2011 issue here.

Photo © Stephanie Sinclair

Stephanie Sinclair wins third Visa d’Or prize (BJP) | Stephanie Sinclair Honored Again at Perpignan Festival (NYT Lens)

The above links also include info on the other Visa pour l’image winners: Visa d’Or news award to Eric Bouvet for his coverage from Bab al-Azizia, Libya, for Le Figaro Magazine; Visa d’Or daily press award to Tomas Munita for his photographs of the conflict in Syria for The New York Times; City of Perpignan Rémi Ochlik Award to Sebastian Liste for his photographs of a community of squatters living in an abandoned chocolate factory in the center of Salvador de Bahia, Brazil; Prix Ani to Misha Friedman for his report on tuberculosis in the former Soviet Union ; Pierre & Alexandra Boulat Grant to Maciek Nabrdalik for his for report on economic migration in Europe; and Canon Female Photojournalist Award to Sarah Caron. Congratulations to all.

Getty Image handed out four $20,000 grants during Visa pour l’image…

Photo © Bharat Choudhary

Getty Awards $80,000 to Four Photojournalists at Perpignan (Lightbox) | Getty Images awards $80,000 worth of grants to four photojournalists (BJP)

Alexia Foundation Women’s Initiative Grant Winner: Tim Matsui

Joel Meyerowitz, David LaChapelle Among This Year’s Lucie Award Honorees (Mediabistro)

The New York Photo Awards 2012 Finalists

International Photography Awards 2012 Winners

Guardian gallery to Taylor Wessing shortlisted four and couple of the other exhibited portraits…

Photo © Jordi Ruiz Cirera

Taylor Wessing photographic portrait prize 2012 shortlisted (Guardian)

Firecracker Grant recipient

The Royal Photographic Society Annual Awards | more info (pdf)

The Wrestlers of Chechnya: Photographs by Yuri Kozyrev

In 1994, when Russia invaded the breakaway region of Chechnya, Yuri Kozyrev, then a freelance photographer, captured some of the most iconic images of the ensuing war. It was too dangerous at the time to live in the Chechen capital of Grozny, which faced heavy Russian bombardment. So he and a group of other reporters (including Marie Colvin, who was killed this year while covering the siege of the Syrian city of Homs) took up residence at a kindergarten called Solnyshka (Sunshine), in the nearby town of Khasavyurt. Lying on the border between Chechnya and the neighboring Russian republic of Dagestan, this town of 130,000 suffered relatively little damage during the war, so journalists, as well as some of the Chechen rebels, used it as a place to rest and resupply before heading back into the war zone.

(For daily coverage of the 2012 Games, visit TIME’s Olympics blog)

In June, Kozyrev returned to Khasavyurt to photograph how the town—and its conflict—have evolved. Although heavy fighting ended with the Russian conquest of Chechnya in 2000, the war left behind an Islamist insurgency that Russia still struggles to quell. On an almost daily basis, rebels inspired by a radical sect of Sunni Islam called Salafism continue to clash with security forces in the region, costing hundreds of lives every year. In Khasavyurt, the Russian effort to counter their influence still scars the unpaved streets. In most neighborhoods, gutted homes mark the sites of “special operations,”the commando raids that use heavy artillery to flush out suspected insurgents. But the town has also been shaped by the central element of Russian soft power in the region: the development of wrestling schools. Much like soccer in the favelas of Sao Paolo and basketball in Harlem, wrestling in Khasavyurt is meant to serve as an inoculation against violence, or at least a distraction from it, by offering the local boys an outlet for their frustrations that does not involve ”going to the woods,” the Russian slang for joining the insurgency.

Every year, Moscow pumps roughly a million dollars into Khasavyurt’s five wrestling academies, which have produced an impressive crop of champions. In the past four Olympic cycles, freestyle wrestlers from Khasavyurt have brought home a total of eight gold medals, along with at least 12 world championship titles and countless trophies in national and European tournaments. At the Olympic Games in London, at least two wrestlers from Khasavyurt will compete to affirm the town’s nickname—The Foundry of Champions—which is scrawled on green signs near the central bazaar, showing the legendary Buvaysar Saytiev in the middle of a grapple.

During his visit in June, Kozyrev’s photography focused on Saytiev and his younger brother Adam, who have won four Olympic gold medals in freestyle wrestling between them. For more than a decade, the Saytiev brothers, who are ethnic Chechens, have served as somewhat reluctant poster boys for the notion of pacification through sport. Their wrestling schools have inspired thousands of young men from Khasavyurt to channel their strength into wrestling rather than rebellion, and Kozyrev spent much of his time photographing them train for the London Olympics. But away from the gyms, members of the Khasavyurt wrestling community revealed that the idea of sport as an antidote to extremism is not quite working out as planned. Some of the town’s leading athletes have started “going to the woods” in recent years, and an alarming number of them have been killed as insurgents during shootouts with police. No longer a haven from conflict, the wrestling schools of Khasavyurt, whose students are often as young as 8, have become recruiting ground for Islamists. As Kozyrev concluded after his visit: “This is a town that remains at war.”

Read more about the Chechen wrestlers of Khasavyurt on TIME.com

Simon Shuster is TIME’s Moscow reporter.

Yuri Kozyrev is a contract photographer for TIME and was named the 2011 Photographer of the Year in the Pictures of the Year International competition.

Escape from Syria: Photographs by William Daniels

When we arrived in Bab Amr, we began to send e-mails to editors saying we were there. We were excited, happy. Of course, we were scared of the situation, but we were happy.

On the first morning, shelling began very close to us. One boom, then a second. After the third, the Syrians with us shouted, “You have to get out!” Then a fourth rocket hit. We lost Marie Colvin, the American reporter, and my friend Rémi Ochlik, a photographer. The correspondent for Le Figaro, Edith Bouvier, was badly injured, as was Paul Conroy, a British photojournalist.

William Daniels—Panos for TIME

This week’s cover of TIME.

The Syrian army targeted Bab Amr everywhere, anywhere. There was no way to get out. One night we visited families staying underground. There were 150 people in a basement with only small lights. They had some rice and a bit of water. Everyone had a family member who had been killed. We felt very bad, thinking, Please help us get out of here; we have lost our friends. But we couldn’t say that, because they had lost everything.

The Syrians who were looking after us were never outwardly scared. They were totally confident. They would prepare medicine in the middle of the room, while we were cowering behind a wall. They were not scared of anything.

Rémi’s death affected me a lot. And perhaps it will affect me even more later. His career was taking off. He had just won the World Press Photo award. He was becoming famous. I was sure he was about to work with magazines he’d dreamed of working for, like TIME. We were excited about getting to Syria. We thought we had a lot of work. I thought, O.K., we’re here, we’ve come for this, to be inside Bab Amr. There was no time to think that maybe we’d made a mistake in going there.

I really liked Rémi. I had a lot of affection for him. Perhaps because I’m older, I felt a bit like an older brother. But sometimes he was the one advising me, especially when we were in dangerous situations. And he just disappeared, so quickly.

Rémi was cremated in Paris on March 6, the first anniversary of the Syrian revolution.

MORE: A Reporter’s Escape from Syria

French photographer William Daniels was on assignment for TIME in the besieged district of Bab Amr. On March 1, after nine days there, he and Edith Bouvier managed to safely cross the border into Lebanon.

William Daniels, Edith Bouvier Arrive Safely in Lebanon

LightBox has just learned that William Daniels, who was on assignment in Syria for TIME, safely crossed the border with wounded Le Figaro journalist Edith Bouvier into Lebanon Thursday. Daniels was present in the war-torn city of Homs during a bombardment by Syrian forces that killed journalists Rémi Ochlik and Marie Colvin on Feb. 22, just one day after Daniels had arrived in the country. He was unharmed but Bouvier suffered serious fractures to her leg; the two appeared together in an online video the following day, pleading for safe transport so that Bouvier could receive medical attention. Today, more than a week later, they have finally made it out of danger. French President Nicholas Sarkozy announced publicly that the two, who are French, would be escorted to their embassy in Beirut—and TIME received a more personal confirmation of the good news: Patrick Witty, TIME’s International Picture Editor, got a text message from Daniels. “We are out,” he wrote, “and Edith is safe!”

In Memoriam: Rémi Ochlik, 1983 – 2012

Rémi Ochlik, an award-winning French photojournalist, was just 29 when he died on Feb. 22, when government forces shelled a building where a growing number of foreign journalists were covering the battle in Homs, Syria. Ochlik died alongside Marie Colvin, an American who was one of Britain’s most honored combat reporters. Two other journalists were reportedly wounded in the barrage.

For Ochlik the horror in Syria came as he was just beginning his career. He was with his friend Lucas Dolego, a French photographer, on the streets of Tunis during the revolution there in January 2011 when Dolego was hit and killed by a police teargas canister. “We had come to work, so I kept on working,” he said in a recent interview, after being honored for his Arab Spring photos. “As a little boy I always wanted to become an archeologist, for the travels, the adventures,” he continued. That changed when his grandfather gave him his first camera.

Lucas Dolega—Polaris

Oct. 23, 2011. French photojournalist Remi Ochlik in Misrata, Libya. Ochlik was killed Feb. 22, 2012, by Syrian shelling of the opposition stronghold Homs.

In 2004, Ochlik traveled to Haiti and photographed the fall of President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, winning the Francois Chalais Award for Young Reporters. He started his own agency, IP3 press, which specialized in combat photography, he covered the conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo in 2008 and he returned to Haiti for a cholera epidemic in 2010. In 2011, Ochlik covered the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya; his work in Libya won him first prize in the General News category of the World Press Photo contest. One of the World Press judges said that his submission told a complete story.

“The idea was not to focus on just one part of the story,” Ochlik told the British Journal of Photography. “Because when you look at what happened, this war was divided in several parts—in Benghazi, in Misrata—and in what I’ve covered, I’ve tried to tell a story.”

Ochlik’s own story took him to Syria merely a week before he was killed. His and Colvin’s deaths came the same week that Anthony Shadid, a renowned foreign correspondent, died of an apparent asthma attack while sneaking out of the country where he had been reporting. Despite his young age, Ochlik understood the risks in his chosen profession. In describing his work in Haiti when he was only 20 years old, he said, “I could sense the danger, but it was where I always dreamt to be, in the action.” His being there allowed the world to witness horrifying atrocities, but it ended the life of a gifted storyteller when his own adventure had barely begun.