Tag Archives: Magnum Photos

Looking For Love in 90′s by Alec Soth

Love makes people do strange things. The history of mankind is rife with love producing illogical and oddball behavior. When it comes to photography, falling in love with the medium is hardly an exception. For example, someone painfully shy might find themselves impulsively photographing strangers without asking for permission. Or, they instinctively photograph something without any ability to later explain why. Alec Soth’s newest book Looking for Love, 1996 is, in its way, about both—the search for love guided by the heart and the search of love guided by the eye.

Soth, a Minnesota native, came to national attention in 2004 after his project Sleeping by the Mississippi was featured at the Whitney museum during its Biennial exhibition and consequently released in book form by the prestigious German publisher Steidl to critical acclaim. Rapidly thrust into the worlds of art and commerce he followed up his debut with equally strong and provocative bookworks: Niagara (2006), Dog Days Bogota (2007) and Broken Manual (2010). Looking for Love, 1996 (Kominek Books, 2012) is a look to the past at his early beginnings as a photographer working with black and white film and a medium format camera.

In his brief introduction to the work Soth describes that time as one of working a miserable job (printing photos at a large commercial lab) and retreating to a bar to be comforted by “the solitude I found among strangers.” He began to concentrate on his own pictures, slyly using the lab to make prints which he smuggled, concealed under his jeans, out to his car. He writes of imagining one day “a stranger would fall in love with me.”

The first photographs of couples we encounter in Looking for Love cling possessively to their partners and leer at Soth’s camera as if to ask, “this is mine, where is yours?” While his journey takes us through the outside landscape and various social gatherings—the aforementioned bar; a convention hall that seems to bridge religion, spirituality and dating under one roof; poker games; singles parties; high school proms—we can sense a young photographer eager to hone his photographic instincts for metaphor and craving the fruits of collaboration between artist, medium and world. A photo of a flirtatious blonde cheerleader sits on the opposite page of a lone, slightly gothic teen outside a music club. The prom king and queen stand proudly before an auditorium empty but for a few hidden background observers and a basketball court scoreboard. An older man sits phone to ear at a ‘Psychic Friends Network’ booth while a quaffed blonde with a #1 ribbon pinned to her lapel passes by paying no mind. Alongside the underlying melancholy of some of these pictures is also the excitement of a photographer discovering their talent and seeing an affirmation of life stilled in photographs.

That affirmation makes the parting photograph all the more important. In it we see Soth himself sitting sprawl-legged in a rental tuxedo as if his own prom has just ended. Perhaps it had. I hope the love he may have found, lasts.

Looking for Love, 1996 is available from Kominek Books.

Jeffrey Ladd is a photographer, writer, editor and founder of Errata Editions.

Articles | October 2012

We haven’t had an Articles post on the site for a long time, so some of the links are as old as from the past summer, but hopefully still relevant to those who haven’t yet read them… This first one’s recent though…interesting article in this week’s Newsweek by Sarah A. Topol on young rookie freelance journalists working in war zones….The main photo seen on the spread below is by Ben Lowy by the way (who is seen with Nicole Tung in the photo on the right), although he obviously isn’t one of the people discussed in the article…

Sarah A. Topol: Rookie Freelancers Risking Their Lives To Cover The Arab Spring (Newsweek)

Somewhat related perhaps… Action packed trailer to 4 part HBO documentary series on conflict photographers: Witness. Surprisingly, I could find very little info on the series online… It doesn’t even appear to have a website… I recognised three photographers in the trailer… Michael Christopher Brown, Eros Hoagland, and Veronique de Viguerie…There are four episodes though:  Libya, South Sudan, Juarez, and Rio… so perhaps there’s a fourth photographer featured, but I don’t know..

Witness : HBO documentary series on conflict photographers (YouTube)

New York Times correspondent Simon Romero on Tomas Munita in Lens blog…

Photo © Tomas Munita

Simon Romero: Losing Fear and Learning to See : on Tomas Munita (NYT Lens)

Magnum Photos CEO on the agency’s new strategy.

Magnum Photos’ new focus: online, online and online (BJP) ‘Magnum Photos’ activities used to be divided into two categories – new work and licensing – respectively dubbed M1 and M2. Now the agency’s CEO, Giorgio Psacharopulo, is pushing Magnum’s online activities as part of a new strategy.’

Photography writer Mary Panzer on the contemporary role of professional photojournalists using Magnum Photos as an example.

Mary Panzer: Magnum Irrelevant? (WSJ) ‘What does photojournalism mean now when everybody with a cellphone can upload pictures for the world to see, or when surveillance cameras provide the most reliable way to document a crime?’

Photo © William Klein

The month in photography (Observer) ‘The Observer New Review’s monthly guide to the 20 best photographic exhibitions and books, featuring Lise Sarfati, William Klein, Luc Delahaye and Lucas Foglia.’

Looking at the Land From the Comfort of Home (Lightbox)

Photo © Michael Nichols

Anatomy of an iPad App: A Photo Archive That’s Also an App (PDN) National Geographic photographer Michael Nichols launched an iPad app of his work that can be downloaded for $3.99.

6Mois: Biannual French magazine offers different approach to photography (BJP)

Hipstamatic angst, Instagram anxiety: time to move the conversation forward (David Campbell blog)

Laurence Butet-Roch: Facebook, Twitter, Instagram: How photographers can benefit from social networks (BJP)

Introducing the six masters and 12 participants of the 2012 Joop Swart Masterclass (World Press Photo)

Couple of new photo blogs from the Middle East…

Photo blog by The National (Abu Dhabi)

Panorama by Egypt Independent newspaper

Al-Akhbar photo blog by Al-Akhbar newspaper in Lebanon

What sounds like an amazing exhibition on war photography coming up at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston…

Photo © Todd Heisler

Total War: A New Look at Conflict Photography (New Yorker) ‘In November, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, will unveil an exhibition on war photography unprecedented in scale and ambition. The origins of “War/Photography: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath” can be traced back to the museum’s acquisition—ten years ago—of the first known print of Joe Rosenthal’s famous photograph of the raising of the American flag at Iwo Jima.’

Amazing five-volume Gordon Parks collection from Steidl… which I’m sure I can’t afford… I’ve been a big Gordon Parks fan ever since I read his autobiography.

Photo © Gordon Parks

Five-Volume Collection of Gordon Parks’s Work by Steidl (NYT Lens)

James Estrin: In an Age of Likes, Commonplace Images Prevail (NYT Lens)

Are Photography Contests Worthwhile or Worthless? (PhotoShelter)

Photo © Maciej Dakowicz

Sean O’Hagan: Cardiff After Dark by Maciej Dakowicz (Guardian) ‘The Polish-born photographer’s epic study of Cardiff nightlife is a hymn to camaraderie and pleasure-seeking’

Reviewed: The Latin American Photobook (BJP)

Behind the Cover: Bill Clinton Photographed by Mark Seliger (Lightbox)

Dan Winters in a Thousand Words: An Ode to a Friend by Nick Offerman (Lightbox)

Photo © Robert Flora/Corbis

Malcolm X as Visual Strategist (NYT Lens)

Peter Dench: In Conversation With Homer Sykes (Photographer’s blog)

The New Economics of Photojournalism: Online Photography Workshops (BJP)

Colvin’s last passport was issued on December 20, 2005, four years after she lost her left eye to shrapnel in Sri Lanka. Here Colvin wears her signature eye patch.

The Passport to Prove It: A Stamped History of Marie Colvin’s Career (Vanity Fair) ‘Through the blurred ink of immigration stamps and festooned Middle Eastern visas, Marie Colvin’s passport reads like an illustrated time line for her coverage of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s election, the rise of the Taliban, the Arab Spring, Muammar Qaddafi’s capture and death, and the conflict in Syria. After becoming a foreign-affairs correspondent for London’s Sunday Times in 1985, Colvin entered nearly every war zone on the planet right up to her death, in Homs, Syria, in February.’

Charlize Theron in talks to play war reporter Marie Colvin (Guardian) ‘Oscar-winning actor has signed on as co-producer for biopic of late Sunday Times war correspondent’

Photo © Henri Cartier-Bresson

Martine Franck obituary (Guardian) Martine Franck Legacy (Lightbox)  Martine Franck, Documentary Photographer, Dies at 74 (NYT)

Dan White ~ 1965-2012 (Panos)

Photographer holds festival of hope amid Aleppo fighting (CNN)

Swedes Schibbye and Persson ‘pardoned’ by Ethiopia (BBC)

Girl from Sebastião Salgado photograph found (DVA Foto)

Two-year probation for Shepard Fairey in image infringement case (BJP)

Kodak to sell off film division (BJP)

MediaStorm Spring 2013 Internship (MediaStorm)

The Guardian relaunches its Eyewitness photography app (BJP)

Carlyle Group to Buy Getty Images for $3.3 Billion (NYT)

Bad news for Reuters (The Independent)

Hollywood celebs and their Leicas…

Leica Cameras, Favored by Celebrities (NYT)

Who Can Improve on Nature? Magazine Editors and Photographers on Retouching Photos (NYT)

Hot off the press: The newsprint as a medium for photographers (BJP)

I AM The Boss, 1982 correspondence between Annie Leibovitz and Rolling Stone co-founder Jann Wenner (Letters of Note)

The most-viewed photo of all time?

Photo © Charles O’Rear

Is This the Most-Viewed Photo of All Time? (Mashable)

7 Lighting Tips for Shooting Video with Digital SLRs (PDN)

Advertising Standards Authority bans two Channel 4 ‘gypsy’ ads (BJP) ‘The ASA has banned two Channel 4 ads used to promote its hit show, My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding. BJP speaks to the author of the photographs featured in the ads’

Greg Funnell: Assignment: A look at the thought process behind a shoot (Photographer’s blog)

Dos and Don’ts: Writing a Photographer Bio (PetaPixel)

To finish off… 52 Worst Photoshop Mistakes In Magazines

Agencies and Photographers | September 2012

Agencies and Collectives

Noor, which celebrated its 5 year anniversary in Perpignan, has completely revamped website… Take a look..

Photo on the front page © Francesco Zizola

Noor Images new website

One of the founding Noor members Jan Grarup ,who recently left the agency, is now represented by Laif…

Laif: Jan Grarup, Worldwide and exclusively at Laif

VII newsletter, including a link to a terrific trailer  titled ‘Think Outside The Cell’, for a group project ‘The Stigma of Incarceration’ by agency’s photographers Jessica Dimmock, Ashley Gilbertson, Ron Haviv, and Ed Kashi…

Photo seen on the newsletter © Ashley Gilbertson

VII newsletter September 2012 | special newsletter: Too Young to Wed

Magnum Photos newsletter

Photo © David Rochkind

Reportage by Getty Images: David Degner, Sarah Elliott, and David Rochkind join Reportage

Reportage by Getty Images: New photographers in Emerging Talent (Reportage Tumblr)

Salt Images : inde­pend­ent pho­to­graphy Agency based in Moscow

New photo agency from Italy…

Echo Photo Agency

Terra Project newsletter

Prime Collective September newsletter

Aletheia Photos collective : newsletter

Photographers

Bruce Gilden has a new website

Bruce Gilden

Markel Redondo newsletter

Giulio di Sturco newsletter

Olivia Arthur

Karla Gachet on Verve

Shannon Jensen on Verve

Simone Donati on Verve

Ara Oshagan on Verve

Tadej Znidarcic on Verve

Brian Driscoll on Verve

Thomas Locke Hobbs on Verve

Amy Helene Johansson on Verve

Arnhel de Serra on Verve

Glenna Gordon

Elizabeth D. Herman

Magda Rakita

Esper

Ed Thompson

Kuba Kaminski

Ian Willms

Diana Markosian

Ian Thomas Jansen-Lonnquist

Fabian Weiss

Rasel Chowdhury

Petrut Calinescu

Pauline Beugnies

Marco Gualazzini

This year’s Ian Parry Scholarship winner Adrian Fussell…

Adrian Fussell

Marcelo Perez del Carpio

Hilde Mesics Cleven

Gesche Würfel

Ben Kilb

Yalda Pashai

Martine Franck: 1938 – 2012

Martine Franck, an esteemed documentary and portrait photographer and second wife of Henri Cartier-Bresson, died of cancer in Paris on Aug. 16 at the age of 74. Comcast Deals . A member of Magnum Photos for more 32 years, Franck was a co-founder and president of the Henri Cartier-Bresson Foundation.

Born in Antwerp, Belgium in 1938, Franck studied art history at the University of Madrid and at the Ecole du Louvre in Paris. In 1963, she began her photographic career at Time-Life in Paris, assisting photographers Eliot Elisofan and Gjon Mili. Although somewhat reserved with her camera at first, she quickly blossomed photographing the refined world of Parisian theater and fashion. A friend, stage director Ariane Mnouchkine, helped establish Franck as the official photographer of the Thtre du Soleil in 1964a position she held for the next 48 years.

As her career grew, Franck pursued a wide range of photographic stories, from documentary reportage in Nepal and Tibet to gentle and evocative portraits of Paris’s creative class. Her portfolio of the cultural elite includes photographic peers Bill Brandt and Sarah Moon as well as artist Diego Giacometti and philosopher Michel Foucault, among others. In 1983, she became a full member of Magnum Photos, one of a small number of female members at the legendary photographic agency. Balancing her time between a variety of stories, her work reflects an innate sensitivity to stories of humanity.

In a piece published in the Guardian in 2006 about her time photographing a Buddhist monastery in Nepal, Franck chose to highlight a photo (slide #2 above) of an elder monk sitting with a young apprentice.

“I was there for an hour, just sitting quietly in a corner, observing,” she explained. “The picture is somehow a symbol of peace, and of young people getting on with old people. Although I didn’t think that at the timein the moment, it’s just instinctive. Afterwards, maybe, you realize what the photograph means.”

Her humanitarian work paired her with numerous social humanitarian organizations and was heralded for the truths it revealed. But her name was also often associated with Henri Cartier-Bresson.

In an interview on Charlie Rose, Franck recalled her first time meeting her future husband in 1965.

“His opening line was ‘Martine, I want to come and see your contact sheets,’” she recalled. They married in 1970. Throughout her career, Franck served as a powerful advocate, both for Magnum and for the continued legacy of her husband. Serving as the president and co-founder of the Henri Cartier-Bresson Foundation, Franck ensured that the spirit of his work survived.

Franck continued to work on her own photography, participating in group projects with Magnum, including “Georgian Spring.” As recently as this April, Franck’s expansive collection of portraits were exhibited in Paris at the Galerie Claude Bernard.

Magnum photographer and President Alex Majoli described Franck as a dear friend and a steady foundation within the photo agency. linkwheel . “Magnum has lost a point of reference, a lighthouse, and one our most influential and beloved members with her death,” he said in a statement released by Magnum over the weekend.

She is survived by her daughter, Melanie.

Martine Franck: 1938 – 2012

Martine Franck, an esteemed documentary and portrait photographer and second wife of Henri Cartier-Bresson, died of cancer in Paris on Aug. 16 at the age of 74. A member of Magnum Photos for more 32 years, Franck was a co-founder and president of the Henri Cartier-Bresson Foundation.

“Martine was one classic Magnum photographer we could all agree with,” said photographer Elliott Erwitt. “Talented, charming, wise, modest and generous, she set a standard of class not often found in our profession. She will be profoundly missed.”

Born in Antwerp, Belgium in 1938, Franck studied art history at the University of Madrid and at the Ecole du Louvre in Paris. In 1963, she began her photographic career at Time-Life in Paris, assisting photographers Eliot Elisofan and Gjon Mili. Although somewhat reserved with her camera at first, she quickly blossomed photographing the refined world of Parisian theater and fashion. A friend, stage director Ariane Mnouchkine, helped establish Franck as the official photographer of the Thtre du Soleil in 1964a position she held for the next 48 years.

As her career grew, Franck pursued a wide range of photographic stories, from documentary reportage in Nepal and Tibet to gentle and evocative portraits of Paris’s creative class. article writing submission . Her portfolio of the cultural elite includes photographic peers Bill Brandt and Sarah Moon as well as artist Diego Giacometti and philosopher Michel Foucault, among others. In 1983, she became a full member of Magnum Photos, one of a small number of female members at the legendary photographic agency. Cable Deals In My Area . Balancing her time between a variety of stories, her work reflects an innate sensitivity to stories of humanity.

In a piece published in the Guardian in 2006 about her time photographing a Buddhist monastery in Nepal, Franck chose to highlight a photo (slide #2 above) of an elder monk sitting with a young apprentice.

“I was there for an hour, just sitting quietly in a corner, observing,” she explained. “The picture is somehow a symbol of peace, and of young people getting on with old people. Although I didn’t think that at the timein the moment, it’s just instinctive. Afterwards, maybe, you realize what the photograph means.”

Her humanitarian work paired her with numerous social humanitarian organizations and was heralded for the truths it revealed. But her name was also often associated with Henri Cartier-Bresson.

In an interview on Charlie Rose, Franck recalled her first time meeting her future husband in 1965.

“His opening line was ‘Martine, I want to come and see your contact sheets,’” she recalled. They married in 1970.

Throughout her career, Franck served as a powerful advocate, both for Magnum and for the continued legacy of her husband. Serving as the president and co-founder of the Henri Cartier-Bresson Foundation, Franck ensured that the spirit of his work survived.

Franck continued to work on her own photography, participating in group projects with Magnum, including “Georgian Spring.” As recently as this April, Franck’s expansive collection of portraits were exhibited in Paris at the Galerie Claude Bernard.

Magnum photographer and President Alex Majoli described Franck as a dear friend and a steady foundation within the photo agency. “Magnum has lost a point of reference, a lighthouse, and one our most influential and beloved members with her death,” he said in a statement released by Magnum over the weekend.

She is survived by her daughter, Melanie.

Agencies and Photographers | August 2012

Agencies

Photo © Seamus Murphy

VII Photo July newsletter

Magnum Photos newsletter

Noor Images July newsletter

Panos Pictures August newsletter

Prime Collective looking for new members

Prime Collective July newsletter

Aletheia Photos July newsletter

Photographers

Tom Stoddart : 78Perspectives  | exhibition

Erika Larsen crowdfunding in Emphas.is to make her Sami project into a book… Such beautiful work…her goal is $16,700

Photo © Erika Larsen

Erika Larsen: Sami – Walking with Reindeer  | Crowfunding on Emphas.is

David Chancellor: Hunters | Crowdfunding on Kickstarter

Photo © Tara Todras-Whitehill

Tara Todras-Whitehill

Sergey Ponomarev

Carolyn Drake

Giulio Piscitelli

Luke Wolagiewicz

Erin Siegal on Verve

Micah Albert on Verve

Ethan Knight on Verve

Sally Ryan on Verve

Åsa Sjöström on Verve

Jeff Rich on Verve

Photo © olsonfarlow.com

Olson & Farlow

Pietro Paolini on Verve

Monika Bulaj on Verve

Giuliano Camarda on Verve

Thilde Jensen on Verve

Marco Shoul on Verve

Jerome Lorieau on Verve

Jed Conklin on Verve

Photo © Guy Martin

Guy Martin

Stuart Matthews

Chiara Tocci

Photos © Sarah Elliott

Sarah Elliott

Adriana Zehbrauskas

Juan Delgado

Photo © Manuel Vazquez

Manuel Vazquez

Lucas Foglia

Alena Zhandarova

Spencer Murphy

Rick Pushinsky: Office | book 

Elizabeth D Herman’s ‘Best Shot’ in the Guardian

Sean Hemmerle

Christaan Felber

Joseph Turp

Titus Simoens

Agencies and Photographers | 14 August 2012

Agencies

Photo © Seamus Murphy

VII Photo July newsletter

Magnum Photos newsletter

Noor Images July newsletter

Panos Pictures August newsletter

Prime Collective looking for new members

Prime Collective July newsletter

Aletheia Photos July newsletter

Photographers

Tom Stoddart : 78Perspectives  | exhibition

Erika Larsen crowdfunding in Emphas.is to make her Sami project into a book… Such beautiful work…her goal is $16,700

Photo © Erika Larsen

Erika Larsen: Sami – Walking with Reindeer  | Crowfunding on Emphas.is

David Chancellor: Hunters | Crowdfunding on Kickstarter

Photo © Tara Todras-Whitehill

Tara Todras-Whitehill

Sergey Ponomarev

Carolyn Drake

Giulio Piscitelli

Luke Wolagiewicz

Micah Albert on Verve

Ethan Knight on Verve

Sally Ryan on Verve

Åsa Sjöström on Verve

Jeff Rich on Verve

Pietro Paolini on Verve

Monika Bulaj on Verve

Giuliano Camarda on Verve

Thilde Jensen on Verve

Marco Shoul on Verve

Jerome Lorieau on Verve

Jed Conklin on Verve

Photo © Guy Martin

Guy Martin

Stuart Matthews

Chiara Tocci

Photos © Sarah Elliott

Sarah Elliott

Adriana Zehbrauskas

Juan Delgado

Photo © Manuel Vazquez

Manuel Vazquez

Lucas Foglia

Alena Zhandarova

Spencer Murphy

Rick Pushinsky: Office | book 

Elizabeth D Herman’s ‘Best Shot’ in the Guardian

Sean Hemmerle

Christaan Felber

Joseph Turp

Titus Simoens

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

›› Vice‘s Motherboard blog released the never-before-told story of the first photograph ever uploaded to the World Wide Web, which celebrates its 20th anniversary next Wednesday.  The image, which has been referred to as “a Photoshop disaster,” has been met with equal parts adoration and horror since its release. The story also appeared on Gallerist NY and ABC News’ Tech This Out, which digs a bit deeper into the naïve roots of the image.

›› PIX, a proposed “photography lifestyle magazine for women,” has drawn commentary from photo editors Stella Kramer and Jasmine DeFoore and Jezebel blogger Katie J.M. Baker for its fluffy content—stories like “Smudge-proof makeup tips for long days behind the camera”—directed towards young female photographers.

›› Two years ago, Scott Blake, the digital artist behind the “Chuck Close Filter” website, was confronted by Close himself for what the painter believed to be unfair use of his copyrighted artwork. Blake recently recounted his dormant dispute with Close in an online essay, raising questions about when art is derivative, when it is plagiaristic, and if it’s possible for it to ever be entirely original. Wired reported, bloggers weighed in.

›› Les Rencontres d’Arles was in full swing last week. As The Guardian reported, Christian Patterson’s Redheaded Peckerwood took home the festival’s author book award, the second year in a row that a Mack-published photobook has won the award—Taryn Simon’s A Living Man Declared Dead…was the 2011 winner. Jonathan Torgovnik won the €25,000 Discovery prize for Intended Consequences, and The Latin American Photobook was awarded the festival’s historical book prize. Additionally, Magnum celebrated its 65th anniversary at the festival, announced nominees Zoe Strauss, Jerome Sessini and Bieke Depoorter, and considered what the future holds for the organization.

›› Yoda reviewed photobooks a couple of weeks ago on Blake Andrews’ blog. We can’t believe we missed it. Work by Vivian Maier, Duane Michals, Rinko KawauchiAlec Soth and John Gossage, and The PhotoBook Review were amongst the titles critiqued by the Jedi Master. On the Gossage/Soth collaboration The Auckland Project: “Tack this poster to their dorm room I’m guessing few collectors shall. In protective cover will it remain. Hmm. Yeesss.”

›› The Rolling Stones celebrate their 50th anniversary this week and Magnum has reached into the archives, posting on their Facebook page a vintage Guy Le Querrec image of Mick Jagger and Keith Richards at a show in 1967. Over at The New Yorker, Photo Booth has launched an 11-image slideshow of photos from the band’s early years, including a birds-eye shot of fans mobbing the band’s vehicle after a press conference at the Hilton, NYC in 1965.

›› More in anniversary news…In celebration of  the 50th anniversary of Andy Warhol’s first solo exhibition, at the Ferus Gallery in Los Angeles, The Metropolitan Museum of Art is planning Regarding Warhol: Fifty Artists, Fifty Years, which opens in September and will also feature works by photographers Cindy Sherman and Robert Mapplethorpe. Over at NokiaConnects Joel Willians recounts the 5 Strangest Habits of Andy Warhol, asking the age-old question, “Eccentricity and genius go hand in hand, right?”