Tag Archives: Lynsey

Aperture, Chris Boot @ LOOK3 Festival

According to Time Magazine’s LightBox, “The very day after the 2011 LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph ended, this year’s guest curators—National Geographic photographer Vincent Musi and Washington Post visuals editor David Griffin—started to put together the slate of artists who will appear [for the 2012 iteration.]” This weekend, the visions of Musi and Griffin come to fruition as Charlottesville, Virginia plays host to LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph 2012.

LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph returns June 7 through 9. Pinned as a “celebration of photography, created by photographers, for those who share a passion for the still image,” LOOK3 is sponsored by BD, National Geographic magazine, and Canon USA, and hosted this year along Charlottesville, VA’s Downtown Mall. The Festival features exhibits and on-stage appearances of three “INsight” photographers, as well as exhibitions, outdoor projections, workshops and interviews over three days and nights.

INsight artists Alex Webb, Donna Ferrato, and Stanley Greene will be featured in 2012, three artists who have met the standards of having produced a significant body of work, and who are understood to possess the capacity to inspire others in the field. The weekend’s masters talks will be given by Ernesto Bazan, Hank Willis Thomas, Lynsey Addario, Bruce Gilden, Robin Schwartz and Camille Seaman, as well as Aperture Foundation’s Executive Director Chris Boot, whose more than 25 years in photography has yielded countless books commissioned, edited or published since 1984.

Aperture will be further present, assembling a special exhibition, Aperture at Sixty Library, which will showcase highlights from Aperture’s many years of publishing—first through the eponymous magazine then, starting in the 1960s, through books—that will reflect on one of the most comprehensive and influential libraries in the history of photography.

LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph
June 7 through 9, 2012
Downtown mall and other venues
Charlottesville, Virginia

Chris Boot MASTERS TALK
June 8, 2012, 11am
The Paramount Theater

Aperture at Sixty Library
June 7 through 17, 2012
200 Water St

———

›› La Lettre de La Photographie profiles exhibitions at the festival by Hank Willis Thomas, Alex WebbBruce GildenStanley Greene, and many more. NYTimes‘ LENS blog takes a closer look at Thomas’ workLA Times‘ Framework interviews Mitch Dobrowner, whose work is also featured at Look3, and Time‘s LightBox speaks with guest curators Vincent Musi and David Griffin.

Curators Look Ahead to LOOK3

The very day after the 2011 LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph ended, this year’s guest curators—National Geographic photographer Vincent Musi and Washington Post visuals editor David Griffin—started to put together the slate of artists who will appear this coming weekend. The annual for-photographers-by-photographers event in Charlottesville, Va. runs June 7-9. But, says Musi, the weekend will include the work of more than one year: professional relationships and the curators’ senses of balance, both developed over many years, were key in the decision process.

The three artists chosen by Musi and Griffin to be this year’s INSight Artists—the featured photographers who, Griffin says, must be people who have made a significant body of work and can inspire other photographers—are Stanley Greene, Donna Ferrato and Alex Webb. Masters talks will be given by Ernesto Bazan, Hank Willis Thomas, Lynsey Addario, Bruce Gilden, Robin Schwartz and Camille Seaman; David Doubilet is this year’s TREES Artist, whose work will be hung in trees along Charlottesville’s downtown pedestrian mall.

Although the festival does not have an explicit theme, Musi says that a documentary slant is strong in all of the featured work. “We also have this crossover because advertising and the fine-art world are really stepping up and doing a lot of what journalism used to do,” he says. And it goes both ways: he cites Hank Willis Thomas as someone who is using journalistic forms outside of the world of journalism. “The common thread,” Musi says. “is that everyone is very excited to have a foot in each world, but the work is very documentary in nature.”

Griffin echoes that sentiment, citing the aesthetic vision evident in Alex Webb’s work as an example of great journalism that “hits that beautiful spot” that touches the art world. He says that this year’s LOOK3 will place a heavier emphasis on individual shows for the speakers’ work, so that guests who attend the talks will be able to see the pictures discussed. There will be more than a dozen hours of onstage programming and a dozen print shows hung, which is more than in previous years.

Both curators agree, though, that the artists who present are not necessarily the highlights of the festival. “This is building a community and sustaining it, so that people go from one side of the stage to the other and back again,” says Musi. That community is made up of artists who attend as viewers, give talks a later year and then maybe teach a workshop some other time.

And artists who just hang out: “There’s a coffee house and it’s right outside of one of the hotels, and I just remember walking out each morning and David Alan Harvey would always be sitting out there having a cup of coffee,” Griffin says of past festivals, “and there’d be Martin Parr sitting with him or Jim Nachtwey, and you’d just walk up and sit down and start talking with a person. That’s one of the really cool things about the festival.”

More information about this year’s LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph, which will take place in Charlottesville, Va., from June 7-9, is available here.

Questions Without Answers Launch @ VII Gallery

Image courtesy of VII

Join Phaidon at VII Gallery on Thursday, May 3rd during the exhibition of Questions Without Answers to celebrate the launch of the long-awaited book of the same name, published in conjunction with the 10th Anniversary of the founding of VII agency.

This major work presents a remarkable sequence of photo-stories from pioneering photo agency VII, documenting world history as we have experienced it since the end of the Cold War. The 11 extraordinarily talented photographers who are part of this agency work at the cutting edge of digital photojournalism, committed to recording social and cultural change as it happens around the world. Each brings an individual vision to the agency – some choosing to tackle dramatic events head-on, others pursuing more idiosyncratic, personal projects – but all share a commitment to their individual subjects and to their belief that the act of communication provides hope even in the most extreme situations.

Questions Without Answers is an ambitious book featuring a strikingly broad selection of photo stories. Photos documenting Barack Obama giving a speech on Afghanistan to American troops sit alongside a collection of portraits featuring famous cultural figures such as David Bowie and Bernardo Bertolucci. We move from an exploration of the spread and impact of AIDS in Asia to dispatches from the current economic crisis and its effect on those working in finance. The crucial work done by VII in documenting conflict – environmental, social and political, both violent and non-violent – is also represented, including stories from the war in Iraq, the crisis in Darfur and the terrible events of 9/11.

With an introduction by the eminent David Friend, the former director of photography at Life magazine, this book is an important, moving and compelling record of the world we live in.

The book includes work by Stephanie Sinclair, and Lynsey Addario, both of whom have been featured in Aperture Magazine and The New York Times Magazine Photographs (Aperture 2011).

Questions Without Answers
Book Launch and Reception

Thursday, May 3, 2012, 7-9pm

VII Gallery
Brooklyn, New York

›› Buy The New York Times Magazine Photographs for 30% off.

Two Takes: One Picture, Two Photographers

The romantic notion is that photojournalists bear unique witness to the events of the world as they unfold around them. In reality, due to circumstance, comfort and organizational requirements, photographers often find themselves in the company of fellow photojournalists, working side by side, when covering the news.

Camaraderie builds between photographers, particularly those working in the war zone. They travel together, discuss their work and often become close friends. They have a mutual respect and share a common bond: their experience of the discomforts and dangers that such work entails.

Photojournalists have always worked in close proximity on foreign assignments and most notably when covering conflict in which they face the dangers this work brings. Robert Capa, Gerda Taro and Chim (David Seymour) famously did so when making their photographs of the Spanish Civil War, including the Mexican Suitcase negatives. In fact, a number of these photographs—that had actually been shot by Taro—were for decades wrongly attributed to Capa.

In 1971, Larry Burrows was killed alongside fellow photojournalists Henri Huet, Kent Potter and Keisaburo Shimamoto—while photographing the Vietnam war—when their helicopter was shot down over Laos.

Mahmud Hams—AFP/Getty Images

Foreign photographers take cover from tear gas during clashes with riot police along a road which leads to the Interior Ministry, near Tahrir Square, in Cairo on November 23, 2011. Several thousand Egyptians rallied in Tahrir Square demanding an end to military rule, despite a promise by the country’s interim leader to transfer power to an elected president by mid-2012.

This March, photographers Lynsey Addario and Tyler Hicks were two of four New York Times journalists kidnapped, beaten and held captive for six days by pro-Gaddafi forces while working in the Libyan city of Ajdabiya.

When photographers Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros were tragically killed, and fellow photographer Guy Martin seriously injured—on April 20 this year— in Libya, they were working side by side covering the rebel fight for Mistrata.

Although both Hetherington and Martin made many distinctive photographs in Libya, there were occasions when they found themselves in the same place at the same time and drawn to taking the same picture. A few months earlier,  both Hetherington and Martin had taken a similar, quite and solemn image as each other—of a dead rebel fighter. This image, as with many others shot in duplicate, is more akin to a forensic or still life study—like the aftermath of flooding or bullet holes in a wall.

In the war-zone, or amid protests and riots, there is often less time for contemplation. Images are captured in a fleeting moment—whether it’s a rocket being fired, a barking dog or a jet of pepper spray—and these photographs show that the photographers who took them were not alone.

In many cases today, photographers working in such close proximity are doing so to satisfy the insatiable appetite of the news cycle. Due to deadlines, images are filed almost immediately after they are shot. This, and the fact that photographers are often working for competing news agencies, makes it impossible for them to share their images or avoid duplication. When international journalists were put up at the five-star Rixos hotel in central Tripoli by Gaddafi’s government earlier this year, the situation resulted in guided tours that left little opportunity to make anything but similar images to each other.

From the Libyan war to the Bangkok floods, LightBox shares a small selection of photographs by some of the most accomplished photojournalists working today. Colleagues who, on occasion, over the past 12 months have found themselves in the same place, at the same time, shooting in stereo.

Lynsey Addario’s Return to the American Road

The night before the tenth anniversary of September 11, I flew out to San Antonio to begin a three-week road trip across America with TIME columnist Joe Klein, from Laredo, Texas up to Des Moines, Iowa.

In the seat next to me, a beautiful woman sat caring for her quadriplegic son, who was sitting in the adjacent row with her daughter. Susan Bradley and her daughter were tender and attentive with Matt in a way that made me think his injuries were new. I, shooting my first assignment in the U.S. after 11 years of covering conflict in Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Congo, Darfur, Lebanon, Somalia and Libya, assumed he was injured at war. Matt was 24, the age of so many young, American men I have spent years with on military embeds in Afghanistan, documenting the war unfolding over the years and witnessing heavy combat and brutal injuries.

As it turns out, Matt had nothing to do with Afghanistan. Like almost everyone Joe and I would meet on the road trip, the war rested on the periphery of their lives, and their primary concerns were here at home. Matt, a football player in college, and the son of a professional football player, had been rafting in Sacramento, California, when he stepped in to rescue a woman being abused by her boyfriend. As Matt walked away, the man allegedly followed him with a mag-light, and beat him on the back of the neck with the heavy flashlight, causing spinal cord injuries that left him paralyzed.

I don’t know why that moment stuck with me. I just immediately connect everything to the wars I have been covering overseas, and that’s not the case back home. I wrongly assumed all Americans at home were as consumed with our troops in Afghanistan as I was abroad.

Over the last decade, I have come to know details about most Afghan warlords, the infinite humanitarian crises across Africa, statistics of maternal mortality rates of women around the world, but I’ve become a stranger in my own country, unfamiliar with the pertinent issues at home and with what Americans are thinking the year before another presidential election. I generally don’t follow domestic news that much aside from how it relates to the stories I’m covering abroad, like what Americans think of the War in Afghanistan.

In three weeks of extensive interviews and casual conversations, I don’t remember a single person, except for veteran Anthony Smith, who was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade in Iraq, bringing up the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, without being prompted by a pointed question. Almost everyone spoke about the economy, healthcare and unemployment. People are polarized. Some are angry, and many say they are disillusioned with President Obama.

Working with Joe was quite an honor—for me, it was like a free education of politics in America. I sat in a lot of his interviews and asked him a lot of questions. Of course, I felt incredibly ignorant, because so often they were questions I should known the answers to—about politics in the States, who was running, what their platforms were. But I honestly hadn’t been following them that closely because I’ve been gone.

In fact, I’ve been gone so long that it took a while to familiarize myself with what the scenes were of the story in each city, and what the reoccurring topics of discussion were. Once I did that, I felt like I needed more time to go back and actually shoot because we moved so quickly. The pace of traveling to one city a day made it difficult for me to figure out what there was to shoot. It’s not like there was a specific protest or news event going on. It was just the city, or a gas station, or a diner, so I had to really talk to people and find out where I need to be as a photographer.

Overall though, it was really nice to be home. It was nice to be in my own country, where I didn’t need a translator or a driver. Where I didn’t need to figure out cultural references or what hijab I needed to wear to cover my hair. Americans are really lovely people—friendly, kind and willing to help you out. For me, it was incredibly humbling to come back and spend three weeks just talking to Americans all across the country and listening to what they had to stay.

Lynsey Addario is a regular contributor to TIME. See more of her work here

Read Joe Klein’s cover story from the Oct. 24, 2011 issue of TIME [available to subscribers] here.

Tuesday 23 August 2011

Features and Essays

The end game in Libya…Bryan Denton has been in the country for most of the last six months covering the events for the New York Times…NYT Lens interviewed him as rebels were pushing towards Tripoli end of last week…

Bryan Denton: Tomorrow Tripoli (NYT Lens: August 2011)

New York Times’ The Battle for Libya gallery … impressive selection from February onwards.

Libya galleries from TIME, NPR, The Atlantic’s In Focus, The Foreign Policy, and Wall Street Journal…

TIME: Libyan Rebels Move on Tripoli 

NPR: The Story Of Libya’s Revolt, In Pictures 

The Atlantic In Focus blog: Qaddafi Losing Grip on Libya

The Foreign Policy: Triumph in Tripoli 

WSJ: Libya’s Revolution

Moises Saman captured the mood in Tripoli just before the rebel push…

Moises Saman: Gaddafi Defiant (Magnum: August 2011)

Maybe a good time to recap on some of the events in the Middle East this year,  by looking at this TIME video of Yuri Kozyrev’s work from Yemen, Egypt, Bahrain, and Libya again…also as Visa Pour l’Image is just around the corner… and the festival will showcase some of the work…

Yuri Kozyrev: On Revolution Road (TIME: June 2011)

Moving on from Libya to other things…

New York Times Magazine did something special with their What They Were Thinking last weekend…

NYT Magazine: Classic Magazine Photographs, Then and Now (NYT Mag: August 2011) “What they were thinking then. What are they thinking now.”

From National Geographic Magazine’s September issue…

Brent Stirton: The Sahara’s Tuareg (NGM: September 2011)

John Stanmeyer: Brazil’s Girl Power (NGM: September 2011)

Michael ‘Nick’ Nichol: Orphan Elephants (NGM: September 2011)

New on VII website…

Giulio Di Sturco: Somali Famine (VII Mentor: August 2011)

Erin Trieb: The Homecoming (VII Mentor: August 2011)

Sim Chi Yin: China’s Lead Curse (VII Mentor: August 2011)

Venetia Dearden: Mariinsky Ballet (VII Network: August 2011)

Lynsey Addario: Saudi Life (VII Network: August 2011)

From VII Magazine…

Antonin Kratochvil: Incognito (VII Magazine: August 2011)

Giulio di Sturco: Doolow Somalia (VII Mag: August 2011)

Jonathan Saruk: Kabul’s Movie Theaters (Reportage by Getty Images: August 2011)

Moises Saman: Syria, Decisively Seen (TIME LB: August 2011)

William Daniels: Revisiting Japan’s Ground Zero (TIME LB: August 2011)

Jake Price: Japan, Five Months On (BNN: August 2011)

Daniel Berehulak: Pakistan: One Year Later (Newsweek: August 2011)

Abbas: Sources of the Ganges (Magnum: August 2011)

Samuel James: In Nigeria, an Islamist Insurgency Strengthens (NYT: August 2011)

Bruce Davidson: NYC Subway Commuters in the 80s (Flavorwire: 2011)

Taslima Akhter: Garment Workers in Bangladesh (NYT Lens: August 2011)

Marcus Bleasdale: Ripe With Abuse (HRW: August 2011)

Jehad Nga: Dadaab (New Yorker: August 2011)

Peter Greste: Somalis Flee to Ethiopia (Al Jazeera: August 2011)

Davin Ellicson: Postcard from Bucharest: After the Revolution (New Yorker Photo Booth: August 2011)

Carlos Saveedra: Daughters of the Goddess Huitaca (Foto8: August 2011)

Alizandra Fazzina: Paper Mill 2 (NOOR: August 2011)

9/11…VII newsletter about the upcoming tenth anniversary with links to features…

VII: 911 Tenth Anniversary (VII: August 2011)

911 with Holgas and Lomos..New trend developing? First Tama/Getty and now Stapleton/Reuters…compare here

Shannon Stapleton: A Different View of 911 (Reuters: August 2011)

Michal Chelbin: Prison Portraits (New Yorker: August 2011)

Brian Shumway: True Men (burn: August 2011)

Anthony Suau: Turmoil on Wall Street (Facing Change: August 2011)

Andrew Moore: Love in Detroit’s Ruins (NYT: August 2011)

Piotr Malecki: Call Centre (Panos: August 2011)

Seamus Murphy: London Riots (Stern: August 2011)

Ryan Gauvin: Shots Out the Rough (NYT Lens: August 2011)

Julio Bittencourt: Big Pool of Ramon (TIME LB: August 2011)

Evan Vucci: Killer Blue- Baptized by Fire (Photographer’s Vimeo:2011)

Evan Vucci: We Don’t Have Enough Power to Fight (Photographer’s Vimeo: 2011)

Thomas Hoepker: Berlin Vintage (Guardian: August 2011)

Stephen Dupont: Generation AK (Vimeo: 2011)

Stephen Shames: Bronx Boys (TIME LB: August 2011)

Sarina Finkelstein: Modern Day Gold Prospectors (NYT Lens: August 2011)

Rodrigo Abd: Mayan Women (Oregonian: 2011)

Articles 

Guardian: Sean Smith’s Best Shot (Guardian: August 2011)

Assignment Chicago: 7 Lies About Photojournalists (Chicago Tribune: August 2011)

TIME LB: John Moore’s story behind the photo : Somalia, One Mother’s Unspeakable Loss (TIME LB: August 2011)

David Campbell: Imaging famine: How critique can help (DC blog: August 2011)

Visual Culture Blog: Defacing Gaddafi (Visual Culture Blog: August 2011)

PDN: Judge Dismisses Copyright Suit Against Ryan McGinley as “Wasteful” (PDN: August 2011)

Lisa Pritchard: Ask An Agent 2 (LPA blog: August 2011)

photo: Massimo Vitali

New York Times Mag: A View From the High (NYT Mag: August 2011) Massimo Vitali

Telegraph: Lomography: the digital photo sceptics strike back (Telegraph: August 2011)

Telegraph: Instagram, Hipstamatic and the mobile photography movement (Telegraph: August 2011)

BJP: Corbis signs deal with Associated Press

BJP: BBC’s Twitter statement is “unacceptable”, says NUJ

Nowness: Corinne Day : Heaven is Real (Nowness: August 2011)

BJP: Award-winning war documentary comes to the UK

photo: Paolo Patrizi

Prison Photography: Photographing the Prostitutes of Italy’s Backroads: Google Street View vs. Boots on the Ground (Prison Photography: August 2011)

Related..

Conscientious: Google Street View and Authorship (Conscientious: August 2011)

MSNBC: At 83, subject of ‘American Girl in Italy’ photo speaks out (MSNBC: August 2011)

NPR: In Japan, Restoring Photos For Tsunami Victims (NPR: August 2011)

PDN: Lee Miller: Great Conflict Photographer, Not So Great Parent (PDN: August 2011)

Carol Guzy: Losing Miss Cassie (Washington Post: 2010)

Events

If you happen to be in Scotland this coming weekend…Some great events and talks happening as part of the Festival of Politics…World Press Photo exhibition and Anastasia Taylor-Lind showing some  of her work and participating in another talk…

Festival of Politics:  Raised by Women: A Photographic Essay on Female Dominated Communities : Anastasia Taylor Lind : Where: Scottish Parliament : Edinburgh : Saturday 27 August, 11:00 – 12:00, Committee Room 3, FREE Chaired by Olivier Laurent, News and Online Editor, British Journal of Photography. Also: Covering Conflict: the role of the photographer and artist : Saturday 27 August, 17:30 – 18:30, Committee Room 3, FREE

Magnum in Motion, Live : NYC (TIME LB)

Crowd Funding Focused (IndieGoGo)

Interviews and Talks

David Campbell and Jon Levy : ”Aesthetics have no place in photographing famine” (OPEN-i Vimeo: August 2011)

Peter Dench (Telegraph: August 2011)

Ashley Gilbertson (PRX: August 2011)

Don McCullin (TateShots on Youtube: August 2011)

Steve Pyke (Hungry Eye: August 2011)

Ben Lowy (Conscientious: August 2011)

Leonie Hampton (Ideas Tap: August 2011)

Shannon Stapleton (Reuters: August 2011)

Yannis Behrakis (Reuters: August 2011)

Brassai (ASX)

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

photo: Samuel James

Exposure Alexandra Boulat Award for Photojournalism : inaugural winner Samuel James. Work ‘Lagos, Area‘ syndicated by VII

Lens Culture Awards includes, documentary, fine art, abstract, and photojournalism. Deadline Sept.17

Ian Parry Scholarship Private view (Olivier Laurent’s Vimeo: August 2011)

Movies and Videos

The Mexican Suitcase

Paul Strand : Under the Dark Cloth (Youtube)

Hungry Eye TV

Agencies

Anne Bourgeois-Vignon joins INSTITUTE as Director of INSTITUTE | news on BJP

Falcon

Photographers

Justin Maxon

Rian Dundon

Angelos Giotopoulos

Stephanie Foden

Jobs

MSF Canada

Video Producer/Editor for msnbc.com in NYC

Whitechapel Gallery are hiring a Schools & Families Education Curator

To finish off…

From Gawker…Experience an Entire Day in New York in One Photograph…Very entertaining photos by Stephen Wilkes

Photoshop horrors….

Either Testino retouchers photochopped Kate Moss’ daughter’s fingers on purpose or someone fucked up bad…

Also…

This timelapse video of a day in California is worth checking out too..

See also Little People

Tuesday 26 July 2011

Features and Essays

Newsweek printed a selection of Tim Hetherington’s final images last week in their July 25, issue…. (You can see the tear sheets here )…and on Monday they also put some of the photos online…

Tim Hetherington: Witness to War (Newsweek: July 2011) Libya

TIME magazine published their summer double issue last Friday. Issue is filled with great photography, including work by Nga, Nahr, Kozyrev, and Addario…

Nahr has the August 1-8 double issue cover of TIME Europe,Asia&South Pacific,which run Islam theme. U.S. edition has ‘Chore Wars’ on cover, which some of the magazine’s US readers might see as dumbing down…(see the covers bigger here)…

Reminded me of when Newsweek did this back in 2006…

Lightbox has some of the summer issue photos online…Addario from Saudi Arabia…

Lynsey Addario: Travels Through Islam: In Pursuit of Romance (TIME LB: July 2011)

Nahr has been travelling through Sahara…

Dominic Nahr: Travels Through Islam, The Sands and Waters of Time (TIME LB: July 2011)

Nga reports from Dadaab…

Jehad Nga: Haven and Hell: The World’s Largest Refugee Camp (TIME LB: July 2011)

Robin Hammond: Hunger Stalks the Horn (Panos: July 2011) Saw the above photo, from a MSF feeding center in Dadaab, being used by Save The Children in their emergency appeal…printed at least in today’s Guardian…see here

Fascinating North Korea series on MSNBC by David Guttenfelder…large edit too…

David Guttenfelder: Journey into North Korea (MSNBC: July 2011)

Moises Saman went to Syria a week ago as the first western photographer to Hama for the New York Times…You can see 22 frames from the assignment on Magnum website…

Moises Saman: Syrian Dissidents (Magnum: July 2011) Interview on Lens blog

Ed Ou has been to Iraq for the International Red Cross…

Ed Ou: This is Iraq (Reportage by Getty Images: July 2011)

Lynsey Addario: South Sudan (VII Network: July 2011)

Adam Ferguson on VII Magazine…

Adam Ferguson: War is Boring (VII Magazine: July 2011)

Larger edit of Charles Ommanney’s series on Petraeus published on Newsweek last week, is available on Reportage site…

Charles Ommanney: Change of Command (Reportage by Getty Images: July 2011)

From this week’s Newsweek…

Ben Lowy: India’s Near Abroad (Newsweek: July 2011)

Pieter Hugo: Electronic Wasteland (Newsweek: July 2011)

Bryan Denton has left Libya again…the below was his last set of photos from the country for NYT…

Bryan Denton: Lack of Coordination Hampers Libya’s Rebels (NYT: July 2011)

Forgot to post this last week…Brent Stirton’s work in NGM August….

Brent Stirton: Malapa Fossils (NGM: August 2011)

Trevor Snapp: Sudan’s Nuba People Flee Attacks (Global Post: July 2011) More on Snapp’s archive

Alixandra Fazzina: Pakistan’s Climate Refugees (NOOR: July 2011)

Eric Bouvet: Shousha Refugee Camp (VII Network: July 2011)

Quite remarkable…

Jošt Franko : The Young Slovenian (TIME LB: July 2011)

Mark Redondo: New Threat on the Way North (WSJ: July 2011)

Michela Pandolfi: Morocco’s First Female Taxi Drive (Parallero Zero: July 2011)

David Degner: Cairo’s Permanent Revolution (Bagnewsnotes: July 2011) text by Alia Malek

David Gray: A Day at the Devon County Show (Foto8: July 2011)

Sarah Rice: A Place Apart (Blurb: 2011)

Interviews

PDN have put up a great series of interviews called Heroes&Mentors…

Don McCullin interview by Eugene Richards (PDN: July 2011)

Stephen Shore  interviewed by Gregory Crewdson (PDN: July 2011)

Eli Reed interviewed by Wayne Lawrence  (PDN: July 2011)

Tina Barney interview by Gillian Laub (PDN: July 2011)

Do check this out…

Peter Bouckaert/Human Rights Watch talks about lost Libyan picture archive he discovered with Tim Hetherington (Guardian: July 2011)

Micha Bar- Am (Haaretz: July 2011)

Pieter Hugo : Permanent Error (PDN: July 2011)

Chris Boot (La Lettre: July 2011)

BBC journalists reflect on the nature of war reporting (Frontline Club: July 2011)

Adam Dean and Jake Price (Vimeo: 2011)

Michael P. King (NPPA Visual Student blog: June 2011)

Daniel Cuthbert (10and5.com: July 2011)

Articles

Gilraj Singh: In The Face of Famine (Reuters photo blog: July 2011)

Related…

Guardian: Consciences awakened by the camera (Guardian: July 2011) Debates about the ethics of famine photography miss the point. By seeing pictures of suffering, we are spurred into action

David Campbell: Thinking Images v.15: Syria, social media and photojournalism (DC blog: July 2011)

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist: Behrouz Mehri (Guardian: July 2011)

Penny De Los Santos: A Tribute to My Mentor at National Geographic, Susan Smith (Photographer’s blog: July 2011)

Martin Parr’s Best Books of the Decade (PhotoIreland Festival: July 2011)

John Stanmeyer: The Soundtrack of Assignments (Photographer’s blog: July 2011)

James Hill: Artist? Journalist? Vestige? (NYT Lens: July 2011) Arles 2011

Lisa Pritchard: Ask an Agent : Writing a photography brief and clarifies a usage condundrum (LPA blog: July 2011)

Guardian: Nan Goldin’s Best Shots (Guardian: July 2011)

NYT: Georgia Frees 4 Photographers Held as Spies for Russia (NYT: July 2011)

Amateur Photographer: Icons of Photography: D Day Landing by Robert Capa (Amateur Photographer: March 2011)

David Burnett: Adieux My Flying Friends (Photographer’s blog: July 2011)

BJP: The V&A Museum in London is going to open a new permanent photography gallery (BJP: July 2011)

BJP: Higher state: Photography apprenticeships as an alternative to traditional degrees (BJP: July 2011)

A Photo Editor: Cold Calling (APE: July 2011)

Chris Floyd: One hundred and forty characters (Photographer’s blog: July 2011)

Verve: Ian Martin (Verve Photo: July 2011)

Videos

Do watch this if you haven’t already…Team of photographers hit the streets of London in June as part of the The London Street Photography Festival to test the policing of public and private space by security firms and their reaction to photographers…

London Street Photography: Stand Your Ground (Youtube: 2011)

Zachary Canepari and Drea Cooper: Aquadettes (Panos: July 2011)

Finding Vivian Mayer trailer

Awards and Compeitions

Conscientious Portfolio Competition 2011

Picture the Difference : Photo competition raising money for Action Aid

Creative Review Photography Annual 2011

Resources

Photography and International Conflict : Resources on documentation of wars, conflicts and human rights issues (via @davidc7)

Photographers 

Nichole Sobecki

Laura Lean

Juho Kuva

Penny De Los Santos

Festivals

Who’s gonna come to Perpignan? I’m gonna be there from Sunday 28 August…

photo: Yuri Kozyrev

Teaser of Visa Pour l’Image 2011 on the festival’s website….

Agencies and Organisations

World Press Photo launched a new website

Noor newsletter July 2011

EventsHere Press Book Launch  Party : Seba Kurtis: Drowned : Cafe Oto, London : 8 August

Exhibtions 

Press Photographer’s Year 2011 exhibition open National Theatre London

To finish off…

Would you work for free? An illustrator responds… (via @Russian_Photos)

Photographer #326: Lynsey Addario

Lynsey Addario, 1973, USA, is a photojournalist who has traveled to many conflict zones. She has been to numerous countries in Africa, the Middle East and South Asia. She often focuses on the situations of women in these places, where violence or poverty are part of daily life. Since 2000, while still under the Taliban rule, she has been to Afghanistan on many occasions. A recent body of work is Veiled Rebellion, a photo essay exploring the lives of women in Afghanistan. The series was featured in the December issue of the National Geographic. She has received numerous awards. Lynsey is a self-taught photographer. While covering the unrest in Lybia she was captured by the troops of Ghaddafi for six days. The following images come from the series Veiled Rebellion, Women at War and Darfur.


Website: www.lynseyaddario.com