Tag Archives: Landscapes

Thomas Jackson, Glow sticks #1

Thomas Jackson, Glow sticks #1

Thomas Jackson

Glow sticks #1,
67 Steps Beach, Greenport, New York, 2012
From the Emergent Behavior series
Website – ThomasJacksonPhotography.com

Thomas Jackson grew up in Providence, Rhode Island. After earning a B.A. in History at The College of Wooster, he spent much of his career in New York as an editor and book reviewer for magazines. It was his particular interest in photography books that led him to pick up a camera eight years ago, first shooting Garry Winogrand-style street scenes, then landscapes, and finally the staged work he does today. His work has been shown at Central Booking in DUMBO, Brooklyn, the Minnesota Center for Book Arts, Vamp and Tramp Booksellers, The Center for Books Arts and the Governors Island Art Fair. He lives in Brooklyn.

Rencontres Internationales de la Photographie en Gaspésie

Anja_Neidringhaus_At_War%5B1%5D

Vanessa_Winship_Georgia

Jocelyne_Alloucherie_Sirenes_Venise_2009

Over 900 photos | 30 photographers from Québec and elsewhere, recognized or emerging | 20 activities in the presence of photographers | 14 host municipalities in the Gaspé

On the theme of “Shaping the Course,” the third edition of Rencontres Internationales de la Photographie en Gaspésie, being held in the summer of 2012, is an invitation to travel the Gaspé Peninsula and follow the artistic trajectory of over 30 photographers from the region and elsewhere.

The holding of Rencontres here means that a tour of the Gaspé amounts to a trip around the world. “Our objective is to inhabit the huge Gaspé territory, and to use all the means placed at our disposal to present and champion artists’ work,” emphasizes Rencontres executive and artistic director Claude Goulet.

The focus of Rencontres this year is the role of the artist in society, the idea being to provide experiences for the eye and food for thought while addressing different esthetics, different probings of the landscape, the environment, the region and the representation of day-to-day life.

From August 18 to 25, professional week is taking place, which will bring together all the photographers participating in Rencontres around the subject of creation. That week constitutes a unique opportunity for the public to meet – at projections, workshops and lectures – the more than 30 professional and emerging photographers from the Gaspé, elsewhere in Québec, and from Canada, the United States and Europe.

The public can visit the photographic installations and exhibits from July 6 to September 10 in the 14 host municipalities: Cap-Chat, Marsoui, Rivière-à-Claude, Grande-Vallée, Gaspé, Percé, Chandler, Paspébiac, Bonaventure, New Richmond, Maria, Carleton-sur-Mer, Nouvelle and Matapedia.

Rencontres internationales de la photographie en Gaspésie is an invitation to come and meet these artists in a region where photographs and landscapes unite around an artistic project. For further details: photogaspesie.ca.

RENCONTRES INTERNATIONALES DE LA PHOTOGRAPHIE EN GASPÉSIE
3rd Edition: Shaping The Course
Exhibitions : July 6 through September 12, 2012
Professional Week : August 18 through 25, 2012

›› View video interviews featuring guest photographers here.
›› View a full schedule of the summer’s events here.


© Anja Neidringhaus, At War
© Vanessa Winship,
Georgia
© Jocelyne Alloucherie,
Sirènes, 511 Gallery, New York

‘Lakes, Trees and Honeybees’: Matthew Brandt at Yossi Milo Gallery

When photographer Matthew Brandt started studying for his MFA, he began with the earliest forms of photography, immersing himself in the history of the process. Studying at UCLA also allowed him to return to his hometown and catch up with friends and family members; it was only a matter of time before the photography and friendship collided in a series of portraits.

And then the collision furthered: one day, a friend who Brandt was photographing started to cry. Brandt asked for her tears. “I know it seems a little mean but at the time it seemed to make sense,” he says. He had been studying salted paper prints, a very early form of 19th-century photography that requires just salt solution and silver nitrate to add light sensitivity to a piece of paper. The sight of that naturally occurring salt water triggered an idea. He used the tears to create a portrait of his crying friend. “It was like this ‘eureka’ process in the dark room,” Brandt says. “I was like, ‘oh my God, this actually worked.’”

Brandt, whose work will be featured starting May 24 in an exhibition at Yossi Milo Gallery in New York City, finished his degree in 2008 but has continued to make photographs using the physical matter of the subject in the development process. The upcoming exhibition Lakes, Trees and Honeybees will include work from three series. For Lakes and Reservoirs, Brandt soaked photographs of lakes in water collected from the subjects, creating unpredictable colorscapes. In Trees, photographs of the title vegetation are printed on paper and with ink made from branches fallen from those very trees. The Honeybees photos are pictures of bees printed with a gum-bichromate process that required using a solution of the bees themselves in the developing process.

These photographs, of their subjects in both senses of the word, also share a certain degree of pathos and a somber tone, says Brandt. Each of the three series is imbued with its own particular sense of loss, a feeling that something is changing, maybe for the worse. The moment captured is one of crisis.

Lakes, for example, while also addressing the more obvious meanings of wetness, highlights the obsolescence of wet photography; color negative paper was becoming hard to get. The Trees series was made right around the time that Brandt graduated from UCLA and George W. Bush left office. The trees photographed are in George Bush Park in Houston; Brandt says he didn’t want to make an overtly political statement but rather to capture a sense of ambivalence about what the future could hold, an uncertainty that he felt in himself and observed on a national level. And Honeybees was made when Colony Collapse Disorder was making news, prompting the photographer to think of the bees as a clue that something was going wrong in the world.

But not everything is changing. The old-fashioned photography processes Brandt uses—not to mention the work involved in making his own paper and ink—are extremely labor-intensive, but Brandt has no plans to take it easy. The photographer, who cites classic American landscape photography as an influence, still sometimes goes hiking with a large-format camera, frequently returning to Yosemite with Ansel Adams in mind. “The guys who would travel with their wagons through these crazy hills—if they put that much work into making a picture, I should do the same,” he says.

Matthew Brandt is a California-based photographer. Lakes, Trees and Honeybees will be on view at Yossi Milo Gallery in New York City from May 24 – June 30. More of his work can be seen here.

Do Process: Henrieke Strecker

This week I am featuring artists exhibiting in Verve Gallery’s Do Process exhibition, showcasing eight unique approaches to the photographic process.

German photographer, now living in New Hampshire, Henrieke Strecker, is exhibiting Photogravures on handmade paper as well as the Chine-collé process. Her images are of abstract yet familiar forms. She creates her imagery using plants, trees, and landscapes, as well as animal and human figures; the beauty that is her own backyard. Her hand-pulled original prints do not capture “an isolated moment or paint a realistic picture like a report.” Rather, she gives “an account of small movements and atmospheres”, and shares with us what she has experienced within that time.

Photogravures were invented in 1870s. A copper plate is coated with a light sensitive gelatin. The coated copper plate is then put in contact with a positive photographic transparency and exposed to light. The plate is washed to remove unexposed gelatin leaving a hardened gelatin negative. The hardened gelatin negative that remains on the plate is then inked. The inked etched copper plate is printed in the same way as an etching in a copper plate printing press.

Chine-collé is a special printmaking technique that allows an artist to use very delicate paper or linen that allows finer detail to be pulled off the coated copper plate. The finer detailed paper or linen with the image is then transferred or bonded to another surface, a heavier support not unlike a matte, to which the finer paper or linen is attached. This technique allows the artist to print on a much more delicate surface and also to provide a background color behind the image that is different from the surrounding backing matte.

Seven Days of Strange Landscapes

From thousands of spiders in Australia and a massive ruptured ice wall in Argentina to the aftermath of the U.S. tornadoes and the wake of last year’s Japanese tsunami, TIME’s photo department presents a selection of surprising and surreal vistas from the past week.

Larry Wiese

Larry Wiese has been engaged in photography for half a century, and his curiosity and desire to explore new ideas and technologies is a strong as ever. Besides being a photographer, he is an educator, and has almost two decades as a gallerist under his belt. He has exhibited widely and his work is held in many public collections. Larry recently sent me his new project, Terrain, Imagining Reality where he reimagined landscapes take on new realities.

Terrain – Imagining Reality : The real and the imagined. I best deal with reality by creating my own. There has long been a fascination with urban decay, the old, the unremarkable and the abandoned. I attempt to glimpse what resides beyond the horizon. The project, Terrain, is an ongoing narrative about my response when in these situations.

Most recently, Terrain began to evolve into “what should, could or would be……” Elements from here took on new meaning over there, and became more “real” than reality…..things imagined, but understood. For now, my “interior terrain” seems far more interesting than the real world…..

Thomas Jackson, Cups

Thomas Jackson, Cups

Thomas Jackson

Cups,
, 2012
From the Emergent Behavior series
Website – ThomasJacksonPhotography.com

Thomas Jackson grew up in Providence, Rhode Island. After earning a B.A. in History at The College of Wooster, he spent much of his career in New York as an editor and book reviewer for magazines. It was his particular interest in photography books that led him to pick up a camera eight years ago, first shooting Garry Winogrand-style street scenes, then landscapes, and finally the staged work he does today. His work has been shown at Central Booking in DUMBO, Brooklyn, the Minnesota Center for Book Arts, Vamp and Tramp Booksellers, The Center for Books Arts and the Governors Island Art Fair. He lives in Brooklyn.

Photographer #442: Vincent Fournier

Vincent Fournier, 1970, France, is an image-maker who combines documentary and staged photography. He studied photography at the École Nationale Supérieure de la Photographie in Arles. His ongoing series entitled Space Project reflects his fascination for the space age. His inspiration stems from various things in his youth and by watching movies as 2001: A Space Odessey and Solaris. His large scale images contain an aspect of humor, mainly due to carefully placing his subjects and objects. For this project, as well as his other personal works, he has traveled around the globe. Tour Operator is a body of work inspired by the book Around the world in 80 days by Jules Vernes. He has documented the transformation of landscapes and the interaction between mankind and the environment. In an intelligent and witty manner he directs our eyes to the bizarre and the usual. In his project The Man Machine he carefully staged robots in urban settings and the spaces where they are being developed. Both his projects Tour Operator and Space Project have been released as books. The following images come from the series Space Project, Tour Operator and The Man Machine.


Website: www.vincentfournier.co.uk