Tag Archives: Landscape Series

Donna J. Wan, At the Air Strip

Donna J. Wan, At the Air Strip

Donna J. Wan

At the Air Strip,
, 2012
From the In The Landscape series
Website – DonnaJWan.com

Donna J. Wan is a San Francisco Bay Area artist. She received her BA from Stanford and her MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. Her work has been shown at Gallery 1401 at the University of Arts, New Mexico Museum of Art, Klompching Gallery, and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. She was named a Magenta Foundation Flash Forward 2007 Emerging Photographer and, most recently, received an Honorable Mention award for Review Santa Fe's Project Launch category and the APA/Lucie Foundation Scholarship grant. Her work has been published in Fraction Magazine, Lenscratch, Time Out Chicago, Profifoto, and the Conscientious website by Joerg Colberg and written about by W.M. Hunt and Virginia Heckert of the J. Paul Getty Museum. In 2009, she was an artist-in-residence at The Center for Photography at Woodstock and was invited by Catherine Opie to lecture at UCLA. Collectors of her work include the Pulitzer-Prize winning author Richard Ford and Thomas Kellner." 

Andrew Jackson, Couple on sofa

Andrew Jackson, Couple on sofa

Andrew Jackson

Couple on sofa,
Handsworth, Birmingham, West Midlands, 2009
From the The Hidden Landscape series
Website – WrittenByLight.com

Andrew Jackson was born in Dudley in the West Midlands. He completed an MA in Documentary Photography at Newport (University of Wales) and has since embarked on both commissioned and personal works. These works have sought to examine our emotional responses both to the spaces that surround us but also to the emotional spaces that exist between ourselves and others. He has a specific interest in exploring notions of identity and representation and is currently examining, within From a Small Island, the legacy of post-war migration from the Caribbean to Britain. His work is held in both private and public collections and he was recently nominated for the Prix Pictet photography Prize

Photographer #428: Eric T. White

Eric T. White, 1982, USA, is a photographer based in New York City. When he started art school he did not have a clear idea what he should study. When Eric’s uncle died he inherited all of his cameras. This lead him to professionally persue a career in photography. He spent four years learning from photographer Christopher Griffith’s technical expertise as his first assistant. His primary focus lies on portraiture and landscape photography. He describes his work as being “about capturing fleeting moments… specific moods and feelings.” For his series National Defense, which consists of two chapters, he documented a fake arabic town in California and the border between the US and Mexico. Currently he is simultaneously working on a portrait series based on the Lower East Side, a black and white landscape series and his first book. The following images come from the series Least Likely To, Lake Harmony and National Defense.

Website: www.mrwhite.cowww.whiteblackwhite.com

Coming of Age in America: The Photography of Joseph Szabo

Joseph Szabo has photographed teenagers for the past four decades. His images perfectly capture the nuances and emotions of adolescence, and they document his subjects in moments of uncertainty, reflection, longing, bravado, exuberance and awkwardness as they dip a toe into the waters of adulthood.

As Cornell Capa wrote in the foreword of Szabo’s first book, Almost Grown, “Szabo’s camera is sharp, incisive, and young, matching his subjects. One can use many adjectives: revealing, tender, raucous, sexy, showy… in Szabo’s hands, the camera is magically there, the light is always available, the moment is perceived, seen, and caught.”

Over the last 40 years, Szabo has quietly built a reputation and cult following as the quintessential photographer of the teenager. While he has published books and had gallery shows, an exhibition at the Heckscher Museum, in Huntington, New York, that opens this month marks Szabo’s first major retrospective. Appropriately located on Long Island—where the majority of the work was made—the show draws from the photographer’s extensive archive and features images from his four books: Almost Grown, Teenage, Rolling Stones Fans and Jones Beach.  Work from his recently rediscovered suburban landscape series Hometown are also on display.

The setting for his first museum show is also significant because Szabo was a young art teacher at Malverne High School, in Long Island, in the early 1970s. He began photographing his disinterested and undisciplined teenage students as a way to connect with them, and Szabo found himself drawn to the kids, gaining a sense of what was happening in their lives. “It was always the emotional aspect I was looking for,” Szabo said in a recent documentary called The Joseph Szabo Project. “I wanted them to express who they are. There’s a beauty to that honesty, and I wanted to get below the surface to reflect their lives in a nonjudgmental way.” The resulting body of work, which starts in the classroom before branching out to the school grounds, parties and Jones Beach, is a celebration of teenage experience. Or as Szabo describes it: “The years of restless desire and blossoming sexuality. The world of high school, parking lots and street corners, and the uniquely American culture in which all of us have grown up.”

Szabo’s images are a candid document of coming of age in small towns and suburban America. “You try to capture life in the moment that speaks to you,” he says in the Joseph Szabo Project. “They are fleeting—one moment it’s there and then its gone.” His intimate and iconic images are picture-perfect proof of these fleeting moments—memories magically captured and frozen forever.

Coming of Age in America: The Photography of Joseph Szabo is on display at the Heckscher Museum of Art, Long Island, New York through March 25.

To see more of Joseph Szabo’s work on LightBox, click here.

” Boring Landscape” series by the italian…

” Boring Landscape” series by the italian photographer Marco Citron,  features in german magazine PhotoNews, with a review about the work written by Martin Parr :

“The photos of Marco Citron from ex-soviet countries look strangely familiar. They remind us of the images of Utopia, so beloved by Communist block photographers in the 60’s and 70s. These can be found in postcards, propaganda books showing the bright new cities they depicted and many other forms. Yet somehow we also know
they are different. Not only are these taken by a artist of some sophistication, but just the way he arranges the cars, and the foregrounds,for example, in the photographs has a real wit to them.
It is both playful and very subtle. The photographs have a humour to them which is almost a contradiction, given the dry and pedestrian nature of the subject matter.
That little ambiguity is  what makes these photographs really work.”

A part of Food For Your Eyes Slideshows presented during  Month of Photograhy in Vienna last november ,  “Boring Landscape” is exhibited at the 5th Darmstädter Tage der Fotografie