Tag Archives: Landscape Photographer

David Soffa, Untitled

David Soffa, Untitled

David Soffa

Untitled,
Malvern, Pennsylvania, 2012
From the Centralia series
Website – DavidSoffa.com

David Soffa (b. 1987) was awarded a fellowship to Yale University Summer School of Art in 2009. He received a BA in Photography from Bard College in 2010. Primarily a landscape photographer, his images investigate the uncanny in everyday situations. Soffa’s photographs have been exhibited nationally in venues such as the Garrison Art Center and the Brooklyn Waterfront Artists Coalition. His work can also be found in the 2013 competition issue of The Photo Review and an upcoming installment of Dwell Magazine. He currently lives and works in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Guest Blogger 2 – Landscape Photography tips and advice with Toby Smith and Robert Leslie on the World Photography Organisation Blog

© Robert Leslie, Leroux Wash Arizona 2011, Stormbelt. “The most pristine water a man can take, they are drilling it out of the ground. So now the old folks are saying, “What happened to all the deer? What happened to all the birds?” All because of some greedy people lighting up the whole city of New York & LA” Navajo Nation Member

For my second post on the World Photo Organisation Blog, Landscape Photography – Getting it Right, I get some tips and advice and touch upon the question of the acceptable levels of post-production in landscape photography. This is a topic I will return to on Hotshoe Blog later.

I’m no landscape photographer so I asked two well-travelled photographers Toby Smith (TS) and Robert Leslie (RL) for some advice. One tip that is oft repeated is ‘being in the right place at the right time’. Apart from this, you also need patience, determination and a good eye.”

Read more over at the WPO blog.

Photo © Toby Smith/Reportage by Getty Images
BAOTAO, CHINA – DECEMBER 20, 2010: Coal trucks grind down-hill from an open-cast coal mine to the main-highway. Congestion at the highway, weighing points and intersections often sees the vehicles jammed for days as China attempts to redistribute its coal.

Filed under: Documentary photography, Photographers, Photographers blogs, Photojournalism Tagged: Edmund Clarke, HotShoe magazine, Landscape photography Tips, Low-light photography, Miranda Gavin, Post-production, Processing RAW, Robert Leslie, Toby Smith, World Photo Organisation Blog

Steve Davis, Old Pacific Highway

Steve Davis, Old Pacific Highway

Steve Davis

Old Pacific Highway,
Near Castle Rock, Washington, 2008
Website – SteveDavisPhotography.com

Steve Davis is a documentary portrait and landscape photographer. His work is in many collections, including the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, the Seattle Art Museum, the George Eastman House, and the Musee de la Photographie in Belgium. He is a former first place recipient of CENTER's Project Competition Award, and has received two Washington Arts Commission/Artist Trust Fellowships. He is represented by the James Harris Gallery, Seattle.

Jessica Auer, Skogafoss

Jessica Auer, Skogafoss

Jessica Auer

Skogafoss,
Iceland, 2011
From the Re-creational Spaces series
Website – JessicaAuer.com

Jessica Auer is a documentary-style landscape photographer from Montréal. Drawing inspiration from history and archeology, her work is largely concerned the study of cultural sites. From the beaten track to the frontier, Jessica explores places where history and mythology are woven into the landscape, and where contemporary landscape issues emerge. She received her MFA in Studio Arts from Concordia University in 2007 and is the recipient of several grants and awards. Her work has been exhibited in Canada and the United States and is held in various private and public collections, including the Musée des Beaux Arts du Québec and the Canada Council Art Bank. Jessica is a co-founder and co-director of Galerie Les Territoires in Montréal and teaches photography at Concordia University. She is represented by Patrick Mikhail Gallery in Ottawa.

Exclusive: Behind the Kraszna-Krausz Photography Book Awards

On Thursday night, the book Carleton Watkins: The Complete Mammoth Photographs by Weston Naef and Christine Hult-Lewis, from Getty Publications, was named the winner of the 2012 Kraszna-Krausz Best Photography Book Award at the Sony Photo Awards in London. The book presents more than 1,000 photographs by Watkins, a 19th-century landscape photographer of the American West, along with essays and research. Jem Southam, a British photographer and a professor at the School of Art and Media at Plymouth University, sat on the judging panel; he spoke exclusively to LightBox about the process of judging photography books.

Getty Publications

Carleton Watkins: The Complete Mammoth Photographs, Weston Naef and Christine Hult-Lewis

Southam says that when the panel met together to narrow the list of books down to five, and then to one, after spending weeks on their own with the nearly 200 contest submissions, the process—meant to take two hours—took five. “Each book that we shortlisted, each of us could have happily stood by it as a winner, and each was an utterly different kind of project,” he says. But the Kraszna-Krausz award has a very specific criterion for recipients, that they make a significant contribution to scholarship in the field, and with that standard in mind the Watkins book stood apart from the rest.

“One of the things that this book has done is bring an immense amount of labor to create a catalogue raisonné the likes of which, for a 19th-century photographer, I’ve never seen,” says Southam. He says that many of the judges were of a generation for which the 1975 New Topographics exhibit at the George Eastman House in Rochester, N.Y., was an important event, and—at least for European photographic scholars—the first time they were introduced to landscape photographers from Watkins’ era, a category that Southam says is still under-examined. This book, Southam says, will be the resource to which future generations of scholars turn when they are writing essays about Watkins and his compatriots—and, as such, the book fulfills the prize’s mission.

The book also accomplishes a scholarly task by showing Watkins’ work in great volume. “He was solving photographic problems for the first time,” says Southam of Watkins’ work from the Yosemite Valley, in which the photographer confronted a landscape that had never before been photographed. “You develop an understanding [with a book] of the photographer’s process that wouldn’t be possible with one print.”

Nevertheless, Southam cautions any photographer against making a book that is intended to do well in competitions. “I’m not very keen on judging. Books aren’t made to be judged,” he says. But it helps when a book is as much of a stand-out as the one in question this time around. “One of the things that one’s looking for is an object that’s captivating as an object, that has presence, that the hands and the body and the mind get a pleasure from the holding and the turning and the looking at, that the whole has an integrity that comes from the vision of the author. This book, every page you turn to is as engrossing as the next.”

The Sony World Photography Awards Exhibitions and World Photo London takes place April 27 – May 20. An exhibition of the winning and shortlisted books from the Kraszna-Krausz book awards 2012 is at Somerset House, London, during that time. More information is available here.

Bill Adams

I met Bill Adams at the recent SPE conference, and was very disappointed to miss his lecture (which I heard was A-mazing).  Bill approaches photography from a unique point of view – with a freedom, creative wackness, and sense of humor this community is so sorely lacking.  I am sharing a few paragraphs from his must-read Wickipedia page:

Bill Adams is an American photographer who claims to be the grandson of legendary landscape photographer Ansel
Adams
. He was lead guitarist for the glam metal band Höt Lixx in the
late 1980s, where he was notorious for
performing in a “squatting” position. Adams was kicked out of the band
in 1991 after it was discovered that he had plagiarized the
heavy metal anthem
Balls to the Wall.

He has made a series of controversial historical claims, such as that Harry Callahan
was the inspiration for the 1971 film Dirty Harry, that drinking
fixer in moderation cures
irritable bowel syndrome (IBS),
that Henri Cartier-Bresson was a member of
Opus Dei, and that 19th-century daguerreotypist
Josiah Hawes murdered photographers who had abandoned the
daguerreotype, using a mercury enema.
He is also known for his photographic series “The Master Suite,” celebrating what he calls “The Great Dictators.” 

Adams claims he was inspired to photograph when his grandfather Ansel
whipped him with a cable release (a cord that tripped the shutter of a
traditional film camera).[23]
His first photographs, at the age of five,
were blurry images of carpet, and sometimes his own feet. Several of his
images were completely unexposed, a conceptual approach he has returned
to repeatedly in recent years. 

What I DO know about Bill Adams is that he was born in Walnut Creek, California, in 1964, and grew up in Santa Cruz. He received a BA in Politics from Princeton University, and an MA and MFA in Photography from The University of New Mexico. He was selected a fellow of the American Photography Institute National Graduate Seminar in 1992. His work has been reproduced in Exploring Color Photography (Editions 2-5) as well as Light and Lens: Photography in the Digital Age. He was recently featured in the journals Exposure and Copper Nickel. He teaches photography at The University of Colorado Denver. Bill lives in Lakewood, Colorado, with his wife, Carol Golemboski, a Center Project Competition winner, and their two children.  I can only imagine their creative household.

I make large, humorous color photographs of elaborately staged scenes in which I play numerous different characters. I typically work on these complex sets for several years, and make successive versions of the same image.

Billboard

Most of the characters are actually photographs mounted on cardboard. In some images, like Pairs Throw Axel, there is one real person surrounded by life-sized photographs.

Pairs Throw Axel

The figures in Dollhouse are about eight inches tall, those in Dead Eye about two feet. The final images are photographed with a 4×5” or 8×10” view camera, enlarged optically, and developed in a chromogenic processor.

Dollhouse

While an initial inspection reveals that all of the characters are the same person, suggesting a digital composite, further examination indicates a straight photograph of a complex staged scene. There are often clues to the illusions, such as reflections of the back of cut-out figures lying around the set. The relationships of the different characters contrast with a single artist enacting a drama for his own pleasure or glorification—or for a self-conscious work of art.

Dead Eye



Many of the scenes depict film sets, premieres, and other spectacles. The shifting identifications and points of view revolve around issues of voyeurism, perspective, and power. Some of these illusory characters are staging their own simulations, which mimic my own. In Dead Eye, the film’s killer’s point-of-view shot mirrors the point of view of the victim through whose “dead” eye we are looking.

Dead Eye (detail)

Dead Eye (reverse view of Dead Eye set)

Pieces such as Universal Picture and Point and Shoot lay claim to being completely transparent, extending the notion that the lens pictures what the eye sees. Since it can only depict what one eye sees, these perspectives represent a single eye looking through a spyglass or sniper sight.

Universal Picture
Point and Shoot

Some images simultaneously observe a parallel attempt to create a visual model, whose shortcomings undermine the premise of optical realism. In Trompe L’Oeil, the Victorian painter’s own blurry nose is a reminder that what we think we see is very different from what is present in our visual field. The image further suggests that a visual model is a function of an ideological perspective. Conceptions of realism are socially constructed, and inevitably reflect prevailing power relations. The subservient maid, sumptuous decor, and Romantic painting style express upper-class Victorian values, even as the painter attempts to objectively record optical experience.

Trompe L’Oeil

Recent photographs contain apparently digitized areas, which are actually painted floors, walls, tables, and suspended objects. In Bachelor Party, the thousands of squares are painted, while the stripper’s pixelated breast is a small board suspended between the camera and the figure. This simulated computer manipulation suggests that parts of the picture were not only photographed at different times, but perhaps were never present at all.
This digital fig leaf creates a kind of voyeuristic censorship, although what it purports to hide, it in fact supplies—and what it creates might itself be “enhanced.” Yet this elaborate artifice is itself a kind of authentic fraudulence, for it is not digital but a physical object, and it is not an augmented woman but a real man.

Bachelor Party

This digital fig leaf creates a kind of voyeuristic censorship, although
what it purports to hide, it in fact supplies—and what it creates might
itself be “enhanced.” Yet this
elaborate artifice is itself a kind of authentic fraudulence, for it
is not digital but a physical object, and it is not an augmented woman
but a real man.

Lori Nix,  Violin Repair Shop

Lori Nix,  Violin Repair Shop

Lori Nix

Violin Repair Shop,
, 2011
From the The City series
Website – LoriNix.net

Lori Nix (b. 1969) was raised throughout the Midwest and holds advanced degrees in ceramics and photography. A landscape photographer at heart, she has been building and photographing complex dioramas in her Brooklyn, New York apartment for over a decade. Her work has been shown across the United States with exhibitions at ClampArt Gallery, New York, NY, The George Eastman House, G. Gibson Gallery in Seattle, WA, Miller Block Gallery, Boston, MA, the California Museum of Photography, and the Catherine Edelman Gallery in Chicago. Her series The City was exhibited in its entirety at the Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, Ohio this past winter.
 

Jessica Auer, Sublime Settlement

Jessica Auer, Sublime Settlement

Jessica Auer

Sublime Settlement,
Faroe Islands, 2011
Website – JessicaAuer.com

Jessica Auer is a documentary-style landscape photographer from Montréal. Drawing inspiration from history and archeology, her work is largely concerned the study of cultural sites. From the beaten track to the frontier, Jessica explores places where history and mythology are woven into the landscape, and where contemporary landscape issues emerge. She received her MFA in Studio Arts from Concordia University in 2007 and is the recipient of several grants and awards. Her work has been exhibited in Canada and the United States and is held in various private and public collections, including the Musée des Beaux Arts du Québec and the Canada Council Art Bank. Jessica is a co-founder and co-director of Galerie Les Territoires in Montréal and teaches photography at Concordia University. She is represented by Patrick Mikhail Gallery in Ottawa.