Tag Archives: Lacma

Número Tres: de la Casa a la Fábrica

From Summer Nights, Walking (c) Robert Adams

The Centre National des Arts Plastiques (CNAP) in France presents Número tres: de la casa a la fábrica, a group show of photography and video exploring the interplay of professional and domestic spheres and spaces as well as their representation, featuring work by Robert Adams, Darren Almond, Maria Thereza Alves, and many more.

Número tres, which opens next Thursday, May 31, 2012 at La Virreina Centre de la Imatge in Barcelona (on view through September 30), was inspired in part, and plays off of Jean-Luc Godard’s 1975 film Numéro Duex. Godard’s acclaimed experimental piece explores links between work and home, machines and people, and the power struggles of an ordinary French family. It presents two juxtaposed “observations” shot on video and played back on two side-by-side monitors which were then simultaneously recorded on 35 mm film.

Given the delocalized role of the factory in today’s multinational economy and society, Número tres offers an opportunity for the reconsideration of these links. “Through a selection of contemporary representations of domestic life, urban landscapes, and gestures of love and labor,” according to the press release, “the exhibition traces new paths from house to factory, from home to work, between these two spaces that are so far apart and yet so close.”

In related programing, CNAP presents Número cuatro/Pantallas paralelas, a panel discussion exploring art, texts, and theoretical work that addresses the privatization of public space, and the publicizing of private space, curated by Pascal Beausse, Curator of Photographic Collections, CNAP and Pascale Cassagnau, Curator of cinema, video, new media, CNAP. More info on date and time to be announced here.

Robert Adams, whose classic monographs The New West (2008) and Summer Nights, Walking (2009) were recently reissued by Aperture, also has a traveling retrospective, The Place We Live, currently on view through June 3, 2012 at LACMA, organized by the Yale University Art Gallery, profiled here by Time’s LightBox.

Adams’ work is also featured in Aperture issues 197180, 169 and 168.

Número tres: de la casa a la fábrica
Exhibition on view:
May 31 – September 30, 2012

La Virreina Centre de la Imatge
La Rambla 99
Barcelona, Spain

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

  • Find May Day photos from around the world at Boston’s The Big Picture Show, New York TimesLensBlog, and LA TimesFramework. Time‘s LightBox also offers “Resources for Photographers Covering Protests,” a bit of a distillation of what the ACLU has up on their website. In addition this week, the National Press Photographers Association and other press groups “call on Justice Department to protect right to record,” pointing out that more than 70 people have been arrested documenting Occupy protests since last September.
  • The New Yorker‘s PhotoBooth shares brilliant photos from the eight night performance run of electronic music and Krautrock pioneers Kraftwerk at MoMA last week– those shows that sold out in a blink of an eye, crashing ticket servers. The featured photos were taken not by concert photographers, but audience members with their cell phones who shared on Instagram, Facebook and Flickr, including one by their pop music critic Sasha Frere-Jones, who wrote for the magazine this week on the band’s legacy.
  • Daidō Moriyama, who is interviewed by Ivan Vartanian in Aperture issue 203, was awarded the Lifetime Achievement award during ICP’s Infinity Award 2012 ceremony this past Wednesday, La Lettre De La Photographie reports, posting a gallery of his images. Be sure to check out the Daidō Moriyama pop-up library, on display at the ICP Library until May 23, 2012, and watch videos from Moriyama’s 2011 PRINTING SHOW–TKY at Aperture, a recreation of his 1974 ad hoc photobook-making performance of the same title. Moriyama also has his first solo museum exhibition, Fracture: Daido Moriyama, on view at LACMA through July 31, 2012, LA Times‘ Framework reports.
  • Ben Lowy, the “Hipstamatic Journalist,” an ardent defender of cell phone photography according to a New York Times profile and Q&A on LensBlog, also won an Infinity Award this week for his work in photojournalism. Soon, the Times reports, Hipstamatic will release a Ben Lowy Lens filter. This week, software developer jag.gr also released the 645 Pro camera app for the iPhone, Rob Galbraith reports, which appeals to advanced photographers and can capture TIFF images, features real-time shutter speed and aperture readouts, a live histogram, a choice of spot or multi-zone metering, as well as focus, exposure, and white balance lock. PhotoShelter Blog shares a lengthy post on “Why Instagram is Terrible for Photographers, and Why You Should Use It,” while APhotoEditor explores some of the many licensing issues with the social media sites through which these images are shared.
  • Read about the long strange saga of student photojournalist Andy Duann’s ‘bear falling out of a tree‘ photo which was went viral last week according to Poytner, eventually being picked up by the Associated Press (we first noticed it on WSJ‘s Photo Journal).  Duann had been considering legal action against his school, the University of Colorado, for distributing the photo without compensating him, until they acknowledged that he retained the copyright and announced they would no longer demand copyright from their students in the future.
  • MediaStorm share two videos this week that live up to their column titled, “Worth Watching.” First, watch Ian Ruhter’s SILVER & LIGHT clip about his–literally–truck-sized traveling camera. Then watch Jeff Harris’ sometimes-heart-wrenching video on his project collecting 4,748 daily self-portraits–and counting. MediaStorm also draws our attention to Aday, “a unique photographic event,” scheduled for May 15, 2012, in which countless people from all different backgrounds use any camera they can get access to and submit photos to create a massive historical document–”A Day in the World,” which will be published as a book in October 2012. Sign up today.
  • Andy Adam’s Flak Photo is teaming up with Tom Griggs’ fototazo next week to host an online community conversation focused on essays from Gerry Badger’s recently published The Pleasures of Good Photographs (Aperture 2010). We’re looking forward to Monday, May 7, 2012, which is when the discussion kicks off with the essay, “Literate, Authoritative, Transcendent: Walker Evans’s American Photographs.”

Daido Moriyama And the Cultural Landscape of Post-War Japan

Youth culture, through revolt, unabashedly asks us to question and confront our historical and cultural traditions. In post-war Japan, the explosion of the taiyozoku or sun tribe—a term for the youth sub-culture that emerged in the 1950s—was seen by the older, conservative generations as crude and violent. Flooded with new imagery from the West, there was a break in the connection to the past and thus a rejection of traditional values. Affected by the nouvelle vague Western youth and media, the taiyozoku were pictured as promiscuous and nihilistic, throwing their cares to the wind.

Arriving in Tokyo in 1961, Daido Moriyama began photographing the seedy streets of Shinjuku, a ward ravaged during the war. Although the Shinjuku of today is best known as the economic and commercial center of Tokyo, it still retains a revolutionary spirit that started in its post-war bars and red-light district. Moriyama’s high-contrast, gritty depictions capture the energy native to the neighborhood, creating a visual history of Tokyo’s youth throughout one of its most combustible phases in history. It is this power that shapes Moriyama’s work, creating an unfolding visual testament to the cultural landscape of post-war Japan.

A new exhibition pays tribute to Moriyama’s four decade relationship with Shinjuku, which serves as a photographic act of memory and desire. In Fracture: Daido Moriyama, opening at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art on April 7, these notions are explored through a selection of prints and books, as well as recent color work. Moriyama began his career in Tokyo assisting the photographer Eikoh Hosoe. Hosoe was a member of the influential artist collective VIVO, which served to capture the significant cultural and structural changes within Japanese society. In line with this method of working, Moriyama began to roam the streets of Shinjuku and, since the early 1960s, has been witness to the ever-changing and expanding post-WWII landscape—a fractured, strange world that oscillates between time and space, reality and fiction.

Fracture: Daido Moriyama is on view at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art from April 7 through July 31.

Robert Adams’ Retrospective Goes West

Retrospective exhibits, while an enviable chance to create a cohesive story from a lifetime’s worth of work, can be a curator’s nightmare: pieces have to be gathered from all over the world, selected at a distance, organized before they even get to the gallery. Not so the new retrospective of the work of Robert Adams, the photographer famous for documenting the people and landscapes of the American West—both natural and manmade—who is approaching his 75th birthday this May. The show, which opens at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) on March 11, was put together at the Yale University Art Gallery (YUAG) from the master set of thousands of prints donated to the gallery by the photographer in 2004.

“We had time to work with originals and precisely strike a tone that we thought the overall exhibition should have,” says Joshua Chuang of the YUAG, who worked with Adams to curate the images that the show comprises. Adams had preserved the best prints of his work throughout his career and he was instrumental in sculpting the retrospective, which will travel for two years following its time at LACMA. “It’s a very special artist indeed who is the best editor of his own work,” says Chuang. “Adams is really exceptional in that way.”

The resulting show is not intended to be merely a collection of over 300 pictures that happen to be the work of one artist, but rather a single, epic piece of work. It includes each of his major projects, dating back to 1964, and dozens of photo books that he has produced. LACMA’s installation also includes a multimedia reading room and a variety of related programs, from a botany-themed tour to talks with local artists who have been inspired by Adams’ work.

Chuang says that, taken together, the pictures in the show demonstrate how, even though many people think that a camera captures a literal version of the world, the art of photography is one of fiction. “The way that fiction functions is very tricky because it’s using facts to tell a fiction, and it has the appearance of fact,” he says. Robert Adams’ particular devotion to those facts, especially when it comes to capturing the precise look of light that may be flat or boring or dim, was so extreme that the photographer, viewing prints of a photograph taken decades before, was able to describe to curators the exact feeling of standing in a particular spot thirty years ago, and how that feeling ought to come across in the image. Chuang says that such fastidiousness about light means that Robert Adams’ work probably captures the West more accurately than that of the other chronicler of that region, Ansel Adams. But that faithfulness doesn’t mean a lack of artistry. Robert Adams’ skill at capturing nondescript light conjures up an experience—whether it’s in a Target store or the desert—with unexpected intricacy.

“He makes smog in California look ethereal and beautiful,” says Chuang.

And because of his relationship with that state, the photographer’s series of Los Angeles photographs will be highlighted in the show’s LACMA incarnation, in order to allow visitors to compare the environment of their daily lives with the one captured on film, says Edward Robinson, LACMA curator.

“It will be great for people to see this extraordinary photographer’s understanding and exploration of the area, to see how changes in the built environment have been reflected in the landscape,” says Robinson, “and what even the trees can suggest about the use of the land over time.”

Robert Adams: The Place We Live will be on view at LACMA from March 11 through June 3. Find out more about the exhibit here, or visit the YUAG companion site here.

Art Platform-Los Angeles

The Lucie Foundation will have an exhibit booth at Art Platform-Los Angeles this weekend, Oct. arizona lawyer . 1-3, 2011 in Downtown Los Angeles, with images showing off the contemporary L.A. art scene. A preview will be held on Sep. Home Security Systems Valencia, CA . 30 from 3-5 p.m. and will be followed by a benefit party for HAMMER Museum, LACMA, and MOCA.

Art Platform is an art fair that is designed to show the culture of Los Angeles through contemporary art and hopes to recognize the L.A. art scene by bringing together all art enthusiasts locally and internationally. Art Platform-Los Angeles and Pacific Standard Time: ART in LA 1946-1980 are launching together this weekend with 60 other cultural institutions as a collaboration to tell the story of the birth of the L.A. art scene

Please visit Art Platform for more information, including times, directions, and how to purchase tickets.

Zoe Crosher Named LACMA Art Here and Now Artist

Since 1963, LACMA has supported local emerging artists, first with the Young Talent Award, then in 1986 with the Art Here and Now (AHAN) program. This year, one of the two recipients of the prestigious award is Aperture-featured photographer Zoe Crosher. Carefully selected by LACMA’s Modern and Contemporary Art Council (MCAC) as well as the museum’s Modern and Contemporary Art curators, nine unique images from Crosher’s The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois have now been acquired for LACMA’s permanent collection.

 

Zoe Crosher is an artist living in Los Angeles. Her work has been exhibited in Vancouver, Rotterdam, Los Angeles, and New York City, including a billboard project with LAXART (2010) and inclusion in the 2010 California Biennial. She has been working on Los Angeles-inspired, site-specific photographic projects since 2001. Her monograph Out the Window (LAX) examines space and transience around the Los Angeles airport, and a series of four monographs on her newest project, The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois, are forthcoming from Aperture Ideas. Crosher has just been announced as a 2011 recipient of LACMA’s prestigious Art Here and Now: Studio Forum (AHAN) program to support acquisitions by emerging Los Angeles-area artists. She holds a B.A. in Art & Politics from UC Santa Cruz, and an M.F.A. in Photography & Integrated Media from CalArts.

 

The project  The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois is also a print-on-demand limited-edition artist book. It is the first in a four-volume set by the artist, and part of Aperture Ideas: Writers and Artists on Photography, a series devoted to the finest critical and creative minds exploring key concepts in photography, including new technologies of production and dissemination.

 

Identical in structure, each volume offers an alternate perspective on the archive of Michelle duBois, an enigmatic collection of images bequeathed to the artist by the subject and compiler. In each subsequent volume, Crosher configures a new set of identities and meanings for this ephemeral archive of photographic detritus through a selection of unique sets of images, reinterpretations of photos seen in previous volumes, as well as new texts.

 

Zoe Crosher’s The Unraveling of Michelle duBois is a reconsidered archive culled from crates, boxes and albums consisting of endless flirtatious smiles, tourist shots, cheesecake mementos and suggestive poses in every film type and size. This limited-edition artist book includes a unique to the volume 8 x 10-inch signed and numbered print. The Reconsidered Archive of Michelle duBois was featured in Aperture magazine, issue 198.