Tag Archives: Kinsey Institute

Shen Wei, Self-portrait (Juniper)

Shen Wei, Self-portrait (Juniper)

Shen Wei

Self-portrait (Juniper),
, 2012
From the I Miss You Already series
Website – ShenPhoto.com

Born and raised in Shanghai, Shen Wei is a fine art photographer currently based in New York City. His work have been exhibited nationally and internationally, with venues including the Museum of the City of New York, Southeast Museum of Photography, Lincoln Center Avery Fisher Hall, the Harn Museum of Art and the CAFA Art Museum in Beijing. His photographs have been featured in publications such as The New Yorker, Aperture, ARTnews, PDN, American Photo, and Chinese Photography. Shen Wei's work is included in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA), Philadelphia Museum of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Museum of Contemporary Photography, Museum of Fine Arts St. Petersburg, Library of Congress, Florida Museum of Photographic Arts, Museum of Chinese in America, Rockefeller Brothers Fund and Kinsey Institute. He holds an MFA in photography, video, and related media from the School of Visual Arts, New York; a BFA in photography from Minneapolis College of Art and Design; and an AA in decorative arts from Shanghai Light Industry College.

Jess T. Dugan, Erica and Krista

Jess T. Dugan, Erica and Krista

Jess T. Dugan

Erica and Krista,
, 2012
From the Every Breath We Drew series
Website – JessDugan.com

Jess T. Dugan is a portrait photographer whose work explores issues of gender, sexuality, identity, and community. She earned a BFA in Photography from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design and an ALM in Museum Studies from Harvard University. Jess’ photographs are regularly exhibited nationwide and are in the permanent collections of the Harvard Art Museum, The Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona, the Michele and Donald D’Amour Museum of Fine Arts, and the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction. She is represented by Gallery Kayafas in Boston, MA and the Schneider Gallery in Chicago, IL.

Jennifer Ray, Dumped Dog

Jennifer Ray, Dumped Dog

Jennifer Ray

Dumped Dog,
Louisiana, 2010
Website – JenniferRay.net

Jennifer Ray has exhibited her work widely, including recent exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP), the Chelsea Art Museum, Hyde Park Art Center, the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the Chicago Cultural Center, and Recycleart (Belgium). Her work is also included in the  The Collector’s Guide to New Art Photography, Vol. 2, published by Humble Arts Foundation, and is in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the MoCP, and the Kinsey Institute. She received her MFA in Photography from Columbia College and is a visiting professor of photography at Oberlin College.

Jess T. Dugan, Dallas

Jess T. Dugan, Dallas

Jess T. Dugan

Dallas,
, 2012
From the Every Breath We Drew series
Website – JessDugan.com

Jess T. Dugan is a portrait photographer whose work explores issues of gender, sexuality, identity, and community. She earned a BFA in Photography from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design and an ALM in Museum Studies from Harvard University. Jess’ photographs are regularly exhibited nationwide and are in the permanent collections of the Harvard Art Museum, The Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona, the Michele and Donald D’Amour Museum of Fine Arts, and the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction. She is represented by Gallery Kayafas in Boston, MA and the Schneider Gallery in Chicago, IL.

Jess T. Dugan, Landen

Jess T. Dugan, Landen

Jess T. Dugan

Landen,
Boston, 2011
Website – JessDugan.com

Jess T. Dugan is a portrait photographer whose work explores issues of gender, sexuality, identity, and community. She earned a BFA in Photography from the Massachusetts College of Art and Design and an ALM in Museum Studies from Harvard University. Jess’s photographs are regularly exhibited nationwide and are in the permanent collections of the Harvard Art Museums, the Michele and Donald D'Amour Museum of Fine Arts, and the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction. She is represented by Gallery Kayafas in Boston, MA and the Schneider Gallery in Chicago, 
IL.

Keren Moscovitch, The Other Woman

Keren Moscovitch, The Other Woman

Keren Moscovitch

The Other Woman,
Brooklyn, 2010
From the Me Into You series
Website – KerenMoscovitch.com

Keren Moscovitch lives and works in New York City where she teaches at the School of Visual Arts. She received a BA from Georgetown University in 2000 and an MFA from the School of Visual Arts in 2005. Her work has been featured in numerous exhibitions, both in the US and abroad, including the Art + Commerce Festival of Emerging Photographers which traveled worldwide in 2006 and exhibitions at I-20 Gallery, Foley and Sasha Wolf Galleries, SLAG Gallery, Studio 150, Vlepo Gallery, the Slap-and-Tickle Gallery and the Kinsey Institute. Her recent work explores intimacy and sexuality within the context of nontraditional relationships and lifestyles. She is publishing her first monograph this spring and is raising funds through Kickstarter where contributors can preorder a copy of the book.

Objects of Sex: ‘Wired’ at the Kinsey Institute

As a child, Sarah Sudhoff wanted to be a doctor. Her maternal grandparents were in the medical field, and she grew up with a healthy fascination for the human body. It’s fitting, then, that much of Sudhoff’s work relates to the human body and its frailty, a topic she finds instantly relatable. “I’m a naturally curious person and often seek photographic subjects that are less mainstream,” the Texas-based fine art photographer says. “I prefer pieces that leave a residue longer after I’ve walked away from the object or seen the photograph.”

Sudhoff had the chance to explore her passions in depth after she participated in the annual juried art exhibition at the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender and Reproduction in Bloomington, Ind., in 2008. Her image, titled Exam 2, was selected for inclusion in the show and now hangs permanently in the Kinsey Institute. After her selection for the show, the photographer was invited to visit the Institute by Catherine Johnson-Roehr, curator of art, artifacts and photographs, as the Kinsey Institute’s first artist in residence in 2010.

“I spent four days absorbing medical journals and textbooks dedicated to the treatment of women in the early 20th century as well as hundreds of photographs of the female nude from the same time period,” Sudhoff says of her visit. “However on the last day of my residency, I witnessed a research assistant washing out a medical device in a small sink—the trough portion of the Biothesiometer. Although a rather routine event for everyone else at the Kinsey Institute, I was caught completely off guard yet intrigued.”

Up until that point, Sudhoff had not realized that psycho-physiological research was still being conducted at the Institute. “I stared at the instrument, wondering about the identity of the volunteer subject and the test being conducted. It was a potent reminder that sexual research is still happening, and it is just as pressing, and taboo, as it was 60 years ago,” she says.

This unexpected occurrence served as a catalyst for the project entitled Wired. In 2011, Sudhoff journeyed back to Bloomington to catalog many of the devices, both contemporary and vintage, that the Institute has used in its research.

“I spent months in the planning stages of the project, acquiring permission and arranging for my flight and accommodations. I only spent one weekend shooting,” she says. “I visited during Indiana University’s spring break while the Kinsey Institute was officially closed. It assured me uninterrupted time to work as well as prevented me from accidentally encountering volunteer research participants.”

Sudhoff believes some of our attitudes towards sex and our sexual selves have changed since the Kinsey Institute began its work, but much of the country is still quite conservative about sex and sexual acceptance.

“A few years ago, my husband went to a drugstore to purchase condoms. The woman behind him in line asked in a serious voice, ‘What, you don’t want to have children?’ ‘Not yet,’ my husband replied.” Sudhoff found herself both shocked and fascinated by the comment. “I found it interesting that a stranger was irritated enough to say something about our sexual habits and discuss them publicly, but at the same time, pass judgment on our choice to practice safe sex,” she said. “It left me wondering why it is only appropriate to discuss sex when it’s for reproduction and not for pleasure?”

Sudhoff still views the project as a work in progress and she’s exploring the possibility of adding additional devices to the series from research institutes like the Kinsey. “I’m not sure how the inclusion of another space and their instruments will work conceptually and aesthetically, but I feel it’s worth investigating,” she says.

Sarah Sudhoff is a fine art photographer based in Texas. See more of her work here.

Dona Schwartz

Looking at few of the portfolios that received Honorable Mentions for the Santa Fe Prize offered by Center and jurored by Maggie Blanchard of Twin Palms Publishing….

I’ve shared Dona Schwartz’s terrific project, In the Kitchen, in my classes for a number of years, so I was happy to see Dona receive an honorable mention for her new project, On the Nest. Dona’s work is about space and time; she examines the “interactions among and within the physical, social, and emotional spaces we inhabit”. She also recognizes the fleeting and evolving periods of childhood, parenting, and being part of a family. The image below, Christina and Mark, 14 months, from On the Nest was the Third Prize Winner in the 2011 Taylor Wessing Photographic Portrait Prize competition, awarded by the National Portrait Gallery, London.

Dona lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota. She earned her PhD at the Annenberg School for Communications is an artist, scholar, and educator. Amongst her many academic publications are two photographic ethnographies, Waucoma Twilight: Generations of the Farm (Smithsonian Institution Press, 1992) and Contesting the Super Bowl (Routledge, 1997). Her new photographic monograph, In the Kitchen, was published by Kehrer Verlag.

Her work has been internationally published and exhibited at venues including the National Portrait Gallery, London, Blue Sky Gallery, the Milwaukee Art Museum, The Stephen Bulger Gallery, the Pingyao International Photography Festival, and in numerous juried exhibitions in the United States. Her work is included in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, George Eastman House, the Musée de l’Elysée, Lausanne, Switzerland, the Harry Ransom Center, the Portland Art Museum, the Kinsey Institute, and the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago’s Midwest Photographers Project.

ON THE NEST: In our lives we experience multiple transitions, and in these moments of change we renegotiate our sense of self. Events like communions, weddings, baby showers, and retirement parties formally mark the new roles and statuses we take on. We cross other thresholds without rituals or celebrations—even though divorce is a momentous life transition there is no script for marking its passage. I am intrigued by the ways in which we move from one life phase to the next, and I am working programmatically to represent complex processes of changing identity.

In On the Nest I use environmental portraiture to examine two moments of change that bookend parents’ lives—the transition to parenthood with a first child’s birth, and the transition to life without day-to-day responsibility for parenting when young adults leave their childhood homes. I photograph expectant parents in nurseries or other spaces they have made ready for their newborns, and I photograph empty nesters in the rooms left vacant by their grown children. The nursery is a canvas on which parents paint in broad strokes their imagined picture of the future. Creating the space is itself a celebratory ritual, and for many parents-to-be the nursery is a showplace—and a sacred space—to be shared.

Teenagers’ abandoned bedrooms tell different stories. The transition to life as an empty nester lacks formal ritual observance. There is no finite gestation period and the new beginning it heralds may be more sobering. In some vacated rooms, abandoned childhood toys compete for shelf space with high school trophies, providing a time-lapse history of nurturance, growth, and development. In others, boxes containing once treasured items await their final disposition. Unused beds become temporary worktables. A sewing room is born. By showing expectant parents alongside their empty nester counterparts I invite viewers to reflect on their own experiences of change and the trajectories we trace in the course of a lifetime.