Tag Archives: Kabul

Pictures of the Week: November 30 – December 7

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From violent protests in Egypt and smugglers tunnels in Gaza to The Duchess of Cambridge’s pregnancy and the “Black Marble” Earth photographed at night from space, TIME presents the best images of the week.

Pictures of the Week: November 16 – 23

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From a ceasefire in the bloody conflict between Israel and Hamas and President Obama’s historic visit to Myanmar to a rebel takeover of Goma in the Democratic Republic of the Congoand a camel fair in India, TIME presents the best images of the week.

Side by Side | ICRC Centre Kabul by Yuri Kozyrev 2012 and James Nachtwey 2009

TIME just posted Yuri Kozyrev’s work from Afghanistan on Lightbox, under the title ‘Afghanistan Now’, some of which is featured in this week’s print issue, dated 11 June 2012 to accompany Aryn Baker’s article  on President Hamid Karzai headlined ‘On His Own’.

Frame 14 in the Kozyrev’s  slideshow from ICRC orthophedic centre in Kabul gave a me flashback to a James Nachtwey frame from the same place taken in 2009 for an ICRC campaign to mark their 150th anniversary.

Many similarities in the photographs, but looking at them side-by-side and seeing two amputees from different generations also provides a pretty sad reflexion of not just an issue continuing to face the people of Afghanistan but perhaps the state of the country in wider sense.

Orthophedic center of the International Committee of the Red Cross in Kabul.
Left: © Yuri Kozyrev, 2012.
Right: ©  James Nachtwey, 2009.

Afghanistan Now, Photographs by Yuri Kozyrev

Afghanistan’s presidential palace is a bucolic refuge protected from the chaos of war by thick walls and layers of security—security so stringent that photographer Yuri Kozyrev and I were prevented from bringing in pens, and in my case, even lipstick. A decade’s worth of bombings, assassination attempts, terror attacks and riots have kept President Hamid Karzai a virtual prisoner. Last week, Yuri and I were invited to spend a day with Karzai in his palace. He keeps an exhausting schedule, zipping between meetings in different buildings with a ground-eating stride that forces his aids into an uneasy trot alongside, as they try to brief him on the latest news. When we arrived, Karzai had just learned of the assassination of one of the members of his High Peace Council, the group assigned to conduct peace negotiations with the Taliban. It was a terrible blow. Still, he kept to his schedule: presiding over his security council update, hosting a lunch for visiting tribal elders from the north, and meeting with a U.S. Congressional delegation led by Nancy Pelosi. He even squeezed in a moment to share his grief with other members of the Peace Council. The only time he paused for a break was when he went to the palace’s small mosque to pray.

The world outside the palace is equally frenetic. Kabul has been shaped by war; its monuments bombed, its green spaces littered with the detritus of battle and its citizens maimed by mines. Even though fear is rife that war will return, Kabulis are busy. The university is in full swing, and local factories now provide the Afghan Army with boots and uniforms. Cafes and shisha bars have sprung up, and, somewhat improbably, a 12-lane bowling alley has become the most popular pastime for the young middle class. It’s a Kabul that Karzai has never seen. The last time he walked through his capital, he tells us, was seven years ago. In two years Karzai will step down. Maybe then he will be able to take another walk.

Read more about Hamid Karzai in this week’s issue of TIME.

Aryn Baker is the Middle East Bureau Chief for TIME.

Yuri Kozyrev is a contract photographer for TIME and was named the 2011 Photographer of the Year in the Pictures of the Year International competition.

Pulitzer Prize for Photography 2012: Massoud Hossaini of Agence France-Presse

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The 2012 Pulitizer Prize for Breaking News Photography
Massoud Hossaini of Agence France-Presse

Tarana Akbari, 12, screams in fear moments after a suicide bomber detonated a bomb in a crowd at the Abul Fazel Shrine in Kabul on December 06, 2011. ‘When I could stand up, I saw that everybody was around me on the ground, really bloody. I was really, really scared,’ said the Tarana, whose name means ‘melody’ in English. seo marketing . Out of 17 women and children from her family who went to a riverside shrine in Kabul that day to mark the Shiite holy day of Ashura, seven died including her seven-year-old brother Shoaib. Comcast Cable Florida . More than 70 people lost their lives in all, and at least nine other members of Tarana’s family were wounded. The blast has prompted fears that Afghanistan could see the sort of sectarian violence that has pitched Shiite against Sunni Muslims in Iraq and Pakistan. The attack was the deadliest strike on the capital in three years. President Hamid Karzai said this was the first time insurgents had struck on such an important religious day. The Taliban condemned the attack, which some official viewed as sectarian. On the same day, a second bomber attacked in the northern city of Mazar-i-Sharif. Karzai said on December 11 that a total of 80 people were killed in both attacks. Published December 7, 2011.

The 2012 Pulitzer Prize Winner: Massoud Hossaini

Columbia University has announced the 2012 Pulitzer Prize winners — and they include Afghan photographer Massoud Hossaini, whose picture of a girl reacting to a suicide bombing took the title in the category of breaking news photography.

The explosion of which the young girl, Tarana Akbari, is a survivor killed more than 70 people. Among the dead were seven of Akbari’s family members, who had traveled to Kabul in honor of the holiday Ashura; nine other relatives were wounded. The Pulitzer announcement calls the photograph, featured here, “heartbreaking.” Hossaini, who works with Agence France-Presse, is a native of Kabul and was raised in Iran. He was a political activist prior to taking up a camera, and got his start photographing Afghan refugees living in his adopted country. He returned to his home country in 2002 and is still based there.

The Pulitzer for feature photography went to Craig F. Walker of the Denver Post for his story about an Iraq war veteran.

A full list of winners can be found on the Pulitzer Prize website.

Pictures of the Week, October 28 – November 4

From the G20 Summit protests and Kabul’s suicide bombings to escalating violence in Gaza and religious pilgrimages, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

See last week’s Pictures of the Week

The Astounding Work of Lauren Lancaster

I’ve known Lauren Lancaster and her work for some time, but I just saw her website again recently, and I was shocked by the incredible images she has made. Much like haunting film stills, the images are really unique for photojournalism, and speak to an eerie stillness in places like Kabul, UAE and The Western Front– places not known to be calm.

Have a look.

Kabul:

United Arab Emirates:

Western Front:

See much more from Lauren Lancaster.