Tag Archives: Jim Goldberg

High and Low: Jim Goldberg’s Works in Process

Although a photographers process is integral to his/her work, it is often a carefully guarded secret. Most photographers tend to keep the development of their work to themselves, sometimes choosing to seek counsel only from a small circle of trusted friends.

It comes as a surprise, then, to find Magnum photographer Jim Goldbergs reworked sketches, videos and maquettes of his groundbreaking books openly shared online.

For Goldberga photographer whose approach has always been eclectic, evolving, and utilizing other mediums, including textthe very act of sharing these works in progress is an important and formative part of the final product.

Goldberg talked to LightBox about the process of revisiting, sharing and republishing two of his groundbreaking works. Rich and Poor (1977-85) juxtaposes two economic classes through intimate environmental portraits and personal statements written on the prints by the subjects, while Raised by Wolves (1985-95) documents the lives of homeless runaways in San Francisco and Los Angeles through photographs, text, drawings and interviews.

Being a teacher for so long, Ive realized that so much of what you teach students is about learning to respect the importance of process. Watching students grow is interestingand them observing my process helps them see that its not that mysterious of a thing to do. In order to figure this artmaking stuff out, its trial and error and experimentation, and takes some time and hard thinking. Putting work out in many forms and stages is an extension of how I see things. I feel the art process is best served when it invites comments and constructive criticism from people. Its a strategic gesture, too, because the feedback I receive helps me move forward with my ideas, which is what process is aboutto craft and evolve something.

Rich and Poor

I was invited by Steidl to republish Rich and Poor. Up to this point my archive was mostly analog. proveedor factura electrnica . Revisiting Rich and Poor meant that it was time to start digitizing my older work. I started by going through all of my contact sheets and re-editing. My studio ended up scanning a lot of images that were never printed in the original book, which in turn gave me a way to experience my old work with a beginners mind. This got me excited about seeing things I had passed over years before during my original edit. When I originally made the work, I was getting so much positive feedback about how I was using images with text that the stand-alone images fell by the wayside. Or perhaps back then I didnt have the courage to include images that functioned simply as straight photographs.

Revisiting the archive excited me on many levels. The freshness of my youth particularly resonated with me, but it also gave me thirty years of distance to look back at these images. Aside from the overall nostalgic patina, I feel like I was looking at these images with a critical distance for the first time. Im now able to separate my own impulses with the overarching history/context of what was happening in the 70s and 80s.

I also wanted to conceptually tie the past in with the present and so decided to revisit a few of the original subjects and map where they are today. I plan to include this in the new Rich and Poor edition via a small insert of contemporary imagery.

Raised by Wolves

Raised by Wolves has been out of print for some time, which has made it expensive and difficult to findso people are constantly asking me for it. Its also been almost 20 years since the book was published, so I felt it would be a good time to put it back on the table as something to look at again, as well as digitize.

Raised by Wolves was a good ten years of working with the kids; collecting ephemera;and making the exhibition and the book.

Still when it came time for the book and exhibition to be produced, and all the deadlines were mounting, aesthetic choices had to be made quickly as to what would be included and what was to go back into boxes. So there was a lot that hasnt been looked at since.

My studio manager and I started brainstorming on strategies to get the work out there again, and we decided that the best way would be to make something to put up on my website.

So we took a new intern to the studiowho happened to be a production whizzand had him organize and digitize everything. I gave him some guidance and checked in with him often on we had had discovered on that particular day, but for the most part gave him free reign as to what could be explored and organized.

Based on what I was witnessing on the streets, I knew that I needed to record what I was experiencing in ways that just couldnt be done with the camera alone. I have, since the beginning of my career, used text, video, audio, Polaroids, found objects, and ephemera. With Raised by Wolves it was my first attempt to incorporate all these various approaches into one project.

Raised by Wolves,video by Jim Goldberg

The children in Raised by Wolves were living hard liveslives that were leading to nowhere. So now, when I reheard a recording that the intern (Brandon) had found in some box, and I heard the voice of lets say Tweeky Dave, well that added something that would extend to the viewers experience of the project.

Its always good to find things that you havent found before. Im not doing it because I have nothing else to do or because Im old and I may as well go back into my archive. Im going back into my archive with purposeto see what I can reinvent. Im still vibrant and making new work. directory submission . The making of the new work guides how the old work looks.

Beyond Rich and Poor and Raised by Wolves, Goldberg is revisiting and re-imagining other projects from his archive. A previously unpublished series titled Coming and Going is being reworked as a series of Japanese small books. Goldberg is also reevaluating and reworking Open See, the project for which he was given the Henri Cartier-Bresson Award in 2007 and the Duestche Borse Award in 2011. Goldberg plans a new edition that will be more expansive than the original, one that will further explain the complexities of the situationof immigration, being a refugee and being trafficked in a place and time. Working roughs for the proposed book and multimedia sketches for the project again are available online. Goldberg says of his process Its always good to find things that you havent found before and Im going back into my archive with purposeto see what I can reinvent. Im still vibrant and making new work. The making of the new work guides how the old work looks.

Photographer/Artist Jim Goldberg is a member of Magnum Photos and Professor of Art at the California College of Arts and Crafts. He Lives in San Francisco.

Multimedia: Jim Goldberg’s out-of-print book Raised by Wolves

A short film about Jim Goldberg’s book ‘Raised by Wolves’. Fotografia . Seeing that the book has been out of print and hard to find, the studio decided to try and share this amazing work by making a movie about it/with it. Combining footage and audio from Jim’s archive, along with new video made specifically for this project, we hope it tells Dave & Echo’s story in a new and exciting way. Edited & animated by Brandon Tauszik – brandontauszik.com

Suitably creepy, and probably NSFW. Discovered via Wired’s Raw File Blog.

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

Postcards From America: The Box Set

In May 2011, Magnum photographers Jim Goldberg, Susan Meiselas, Paolo Pellegrin, Alec Soth and Mikhael Subotzky, as well as writer Ginger Strand, set out from Austin, Texas in an RV. Two weeks and 1750 miles later, they arrived in Oakland, Calif.

Together, they documented their experience, the result of which is a new, limited edition book that launches this week. Postcards from America is a collection of objects: a book, five bumper stickers, a newspaper, two fold-outs, three cards, a poster and five zines, all in a signed and numbered box.

“We knew each other through Magnum, obviously, but we’d never actually tried to work together,” says Soth. “We wanted to see what that would be like, to see if we could create a kind of polyphonic sound. Hopefully the box book achieves that. It also gave us an opportunity to push each other creatively and conceptually, which I think has carried over into our individual work.”

The book does not attempt to document the American Southwest in y traditional sense. Instead, it uses the prototypically western experience of a road trip as an entry point into depicting the region. “Some of us are used to working only on immersive, multiyear projects,” says Subotzky. “Obviously this was very different. Doing it collectively brought a great energy and looseness to the work. The box, with all its moving and arrangeable pieces, really reflects that and reflects what we found on the road—a divided and often contradictory society, unsure about its identity and future.”

The Postcards from America box book, in a signed edition of 500, is available exclusively at www.postcards.magnumphotos.com 

The second Postcards from America project is scheduled to begin this April in Rochester, New York.

To read more about the project background on Lightbox click here. To read a dispatch from the project click here.

Vanessa Winship awarded 30,000 euro HCB prize

One of our personal favorites, British photographer Vanessa Winship, has won the prestigious Henri Cartier-Bresson Award. The HCB Award is a remarkable prize of 30,000 euros “to stimulate a photographers creativity by offering the opportunity to carry out a project that would otherwise be difficult to achieve.” This is the first time in the history of the Award that a female photographer has won.

Lens Culture featured her series Sweet Nothings in 2008.

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Vanessa Winship / Agence VU

winship-blog-2.jpg

Vanessa Winship / Agence VU

Winships work has focused on individuals and history. She began with a classic journalistic approach in her early work in the Balkans and around the Black Sea. Then, she entered into a more frontal style with large-format portraits: Sweet Nothings, and Georgia. Alliant Group . For her new project Out there: an American Odyssey, she wants to tell the stories of anonymous individuals deluded by the American dream. She believes that people are often more honest, direct, and revealing when confronted by a stranger.

The Award was created in 1988 by Robert Delpire, and it was relaunched in 2003 with the opening of Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson in Paris. Previous recipients of the Award are: Chris Killip (1989), Josef Koudelka (1991), Larry Towell (2003), Fazal Sheikh (2005), Jim Goldberg (2007) and David Goldblatt (2009). The prize is awarded every two years.

When we wrote to congratulate her, she responded, “I’m a little overwhelmed and speechless. This is huge, and they are blood big shoes to fill!”

The jury underlined the humanist tradition of Vanessa Winship’s work, “making photographs that can be seen as classical documentary but that have a sensitivity and complexity that is thoroughly contemporary.”

An exhibition of her finished project is scheduled to be shown at the Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson in Spring 2013.

winship-blog-1.jpg

Vanessa Winship / Agence VU

WIN01.jpg

Vanessa Winship / Agence VU

WIN02.jpg

Vanessa Winship / Agence VU

Vanessa Winship awarded 30,000 euro HCB prize

One of our personal favorites, British photographer Vanessa Winship, has won the prestigious Henri Cartier-Bresson Award. The HCB Award is a remarkable prize of 30,000 euros “to stimulate a photographers creativity by offering the opportunity to carry out a project that would otherwise be difficult to achieve.” This is the first time in the history of the Award that a female photographer has won.

Lens Culture featured her series Sweet Nothings in 2008.

winship-blog-3.jpg

Vanessa Winship / Agence VU

winship-blog-2.jpg

Vanessa Winship / Agence VU

Winships work has focused on individuals and history. She began with a classic journalistic approach in her early work in the Balkans and around the Black Sea. Then, she entered into a more frontal style with large-format portraits: Sweet Nothings, and Georgia. home builders . For her new project Out there: an American Odyssey, she wants to tell the stories of anonymous individuals deluded by the American dream. She believes that people are often more honest, direct, and revealing when confronted by a stranger.

The Award was created in 1988 by Robert Delpire, and it was relaunched in 2003 with the opening of Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson in Paris. Previous recipients of the Award are: Chris Killip (1989), Josef Koudelka (1991), Larry Towell (2003), Fazal Sheikh (2005), Jim Goldberg (2007) and David Goldblatt (2009). The prize is awarded every two years.

When we wrote to congratulate her, she responded, “I’m a little overwhelmed and speechless. This is huge, and they are blood big shoes to fill!”

The jury underlined the humanist tradition of Vanessa Winship’s work, “making photographs that can be seen as classical documentary but that have a sensitivity and complexity that is thoroughly contemporary.”

An exhibition of her finished project is scheduled to be shown at the Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson in Spring 2013.

winship-blog-1.jpg

Vanessa Winship / Agence VU

WIN01.jpg

Vanessa Winship / Agence VU

WIN02.jpg

Vanessa Winship / Agence VU

Sunday 19 June 2011

Hello from Lebanon again…Starting my last week here tomorrow, before heading to Finland for a bit…

Here are this week’s updates…

Features and Essays

From National Geographic Magazine July issue…

Lynsey Addario: Baghdad After the Storm (NGM: July 2011)

Quite surprised to see Hipstas in NGM…I would have thought NatGeo editors too conservative for such thing…

Michael Christopher Brown: Young, Angry, and Wired (NGM: July 2011) Middle East Youth Rising

Really liked these Bleasdale frames….

Marcus Bleasdale: China – The Internet Revolution (VII: June 2011)

Magnum photographers Antoine D’Agata, Moises Saman, and Ian Berry for the UNHCR… via @wemarijnissen

photo: Moises Saman

UNHCR: 60 Years 60 Lives (UNHCR: June 2011)

Stephanie Sinclair’s recent work from NYT Mag now on VII website…

Stephanie Sinclair: Tatiana and Krista’s Special Connection (VII: June 2011)

Stephanie Sinclair: Too Young To Wed (Pulitzer Center: June 2011)

David Goldman: Children of the Fallen (YouTube: June 2011)

Jim Goldberg: Portraits from Bonnaroo (TIME LB: June 2011)

Brooks Kraft: New Hampshire (TIME LB: June 2011)

Heidi Levine: Inside Hamas (Globe and Mail: June 2011)

Jean Gaumy: Nuclear Deterrence : Inside the French Nuclear Submarine (Magnum Photos: June 2011)

Espen Rasmussen: In Transit (WSJ: June 2011)

Jason Eskenazi: East-West Divide (NYT Lens: June 2011)

Irina Werning: Argentina (NPR: June 2011)

Matt Black: Modern Agonies in Ancient Mexican Villages (NYT Lens: June 2011)

Father’s Day in the back UK today..

Natalie Naccache: Single Fathers (Photographer’s website: June 2011)

Etienne de Malglaive: Misrata (Photographer’s website: June 2011)

Ivan LaBianca: Libya (Photographer’s website: June 2011)

Tomasz Szustek: Unwanted Refugees (Photographer’s website: June 2011) Refugees in Tunisian-Libyan border

Articles

Two really good articles from the Guardian this week…

Guardian: The shot that nearly killed me: War photographers (Guardian: June 2011)

Guardian:  The artists’ artist: reportage photographers (Guardian: June 2011) Leading snappers choose their favourite living reportage photographer

David Campbell on photojournalists preferring to work abroad…And he had done his analysis partly by looking at features and essays i’ve covered here on Photojournalism Links….

David Campbell: Who’s Afraid of Home? Photojournalism’s Foreign Fixation (DC blog: June 2011)

Blast from the past, but so saw people share this online this week… so I’ll post this again too…

“Embrace frustration. It pushes you to learn and grow, broadens your horizons, and lights a fire under you when your work has gone cold. Nothing is more dangerous to an artist than complacency” – Cheryl Jacobs Nicolai

Cheryl Jacobs Nicolai: Advice for Aspiring Photographers (JPG Mag: from 2008)

Lynsey Addario: Backseat Driving in Saudi Arabia (TIME LB: June 2011)

Guardian: Album of the years: can photo albums survive the digital age?  (Guardian: June 2011) An evocative survey of photo albums captures the history of American photography – and asks whether we’ll ever impose order on our sprawling digital collections

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist: Tomas Bravo (Guardian: June 2011)

TIME: Doctored Photos – The Art of the Altered Image (TIME LB: June 2011)

NPR: Behind the Scenes of Irina Werning’s Back to the Future (NPR: June 2011)

Interviews and Talks 

Sally Mann and Nan Goldin (Look3: June 2011)

Bruce Gilden (YouTube: June 2011)

Tyler Hicks : College of Communication Convocation  (Youtube: June 2011)

Leo Maguire : British photographer secures More4 documentary funding (BJP: June 2011)

Taryn Simon (Youtube: 2011)

Awards and Grants 

Congratulations to Jan Grarup for winning the Oskar Barnack Award… Leica blog interviewed him..

Jan Grarup win Oskar Barnack Award 2011 (Leica blog: June 2011)

Ian Parry Scholarship Calling for Entries : Deadline 30 June 

Terry O’Neill Award now open for entries

Both of the above two were won by Sebastian Liste last year…

Photocrati Fund Winner and Top Finalists (Photocrati: June 2011)

Vanessa Winship wins Henri Cartier-Bresson Award (BJP: June 2011)

Delhi Photo Festival is calling for submission : Deadline 15 July

Life.com’s 2011 Photo Blog award 

Agencies

Panos has added six new members to their roster… including Ivor Prickett and Guy Martin…

BJP: Panos Pictures adds six new members (BJP: June 2011)

VII Newsletter June 2011

Noor Newletter June 2011

Noor : Call for Submission : Deadline August 5

AppsKadir van Lohuizen’s ViaPanAm now released

BlogsKael Alford

Jim Goldberg Wins Deutsche Börse Photography Prize

San Francisco, California, 2000 © Jim Goldberg (cover Aperture magazine issue 187)

Congratulations to Jim Goldberg for winning the prestigious Deutsche Börse Photography Prize! Goldberg was nominated for his exhibition Open See at the Photographers’ Gallery, London this past year.

Goldberg’s work was featured on the cover of Aperture magazine issue 187 as part of an article on Sixty Years of Magnum, by Gerry Badger.