Tag Archives: Jennifer Ray

Jennifer Ray, Dumped Dog

Jennifer Ray, Dumped Dog

Jennifer Ray

Dumped Dog,
Louisiana, 2010
Website – JenniferRay.net

Jennifer Ray has exhibited her work widely, including recent exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP), the Chelsea Art Museum, Hyde Park Art Center, the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the Chicago Cultural Center, and Recycleart (Belgium). Her work is also included in the  The Collector’s Guide to New Art Photography, Vol. 2, published by Humble Arts Foundation, and is in the collections of the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the MoCP, and the Kinsey Institute. She received her MFA in Photography from Columbia College and is a visiting professor of photography at Oberlin College.

Break Out the Fringe for Tomorrow’s 1920s-Themed Gala

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It was a time of outlaws, bootleggers and speakeasies. But, for our prohibition-themed annual Benefit and Auction tomorrow, it will be a night of jazz music, custom 1920s-era cocktails, and a live and silent auction featuring prints by both established and up-in-coming photographers.

The event, which runs 6 to 10 p.m., will be held at Room 1520, located at 1520 W. Fulton St. in Chicago.

The auction includes works by Penelope Umbrico, Olivo Barbieri, Dawoud Bey, Nick Kline, Lori Nix, Ken Fandell, John Sparagana, John Opera, John Baldessari, Jeremy Hobbs, Jennifer Ray, Sandro, Jan Theun van Rees, Guy Tillim, Dave Jordano, Corinne May Botz, Christian Patterson, Carrie Schneider and Alejandro Cartagena.

We can’t wait to see you all there!

MoCP in the News: Press for Our Origins

“Where do we, as humans, come from?” With such a broad question at the heart of Our Origins, it’s no wonder the exhibition has gotten people talking. From art critics to bloggers, take a look at what people are saying about Our Origins, which is on display at the MoCP through October 16:

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Jennifer Ray, Strangler Fig Embrace, 2009; Courtesy of the artist

“Inspired by everything from fossils to x-ray diffusion, this ambitious group show considers the unanswerable questions — all from a very self-conscious, often very funny point of view.” – Flavor Pill Chicago

“The chatter about where we come from seems inescapable. Which is what makes the relative silence of Our Origins refreshing.” – Chicago Reader

“Plenty of thought-provoking works on view.” – Time Out Chicago

“[Our Origins] reflects on natural history from a distinctly human point of view.” – The Beacon-News

“For all the wit, wisdom and insight here, Alison Ruttan steals the show… [While she] may not have revealed the mysteries of being; she has effectively portrayed us as too close to other primates for comfort, evoking a mixture of humor, absurdity, depression, truth and self-recognition.” – Newcity Art

In addition to the show, curator Allison Grant also gets a little love:

“It’s refreshing to see a curator take aim at the largest human questions, and it’s good for Grant’s first exhibition ever. I admire that ambition and hope Grant will continue probing those deep questions, since for as many artists as there are investigating consumerism and commodity culture, there are just as many examining the hard philosophical and scientific question” – Art Slant

Our Origins Opening Reception Draws a Crowd

We’d like to thank everyone who came out to the opening reception for Our Origins last Thursday!

The event, which included a guided gallery tour from contributing artists Alison Ruttan, Ken Fandell, Alison Carey and Jennifer Ray, had an exceptional turnout, allowing artists, curators, college students and the general public to meet and discuss artistic representations to the age-old question, “Where do we, as humans, come from?”

In case you missed it, here are some photos from the event:

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Jennifer Ray discusses the inspiration behind her series, Go Deep into the Woods.

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Alison Carey discusses her series, Organic Remains of a Former World with visitors.

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After giving a lecture on his video installation, The Most Important Picture Ever, Ken Fandell mingles during the reception.

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Jennifer Ray fields questions on her work during the opening reception.

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The crowd snacks and socializes, no doubt making plans to meet up at the next MoCP event.

Miss this event? Visit us for one of these upcoming events at the museum:
• Thursday, September 27 at 5 p.m. when Colleen Plumb and Kelli Connell visit the museum to sign their books, Animals are Outside Today and Double Life.
• Tuesday, October 2 when Our Origins artist Aspen Mays joins Kathryn Schaffer, postdoctoral fellow at the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics at the University of Chicago, to talk about ways scientists and photographers can team up to help answer questions about the origins of the universe.

Plenty of Stargazing at the Opening Reception for Our Origins

Some of the earliest humans theorized about our origins by gazing up at the cosmos.

Tonight, we will continue this time-honored experience at the opening reception for the museum’s current exhibition, Our Origins, which attempts to trace our shared human past beyond recorded history.

Join us for one (or all) of three opening events:

4pm: Sit in on a gallery discussion between exhibiting artists Alison Carey, Ken Fandell, Jennifer Ray and Alison Ruttan, which will be moderated by curator Allison Grant.

5 – 7pm: Mingle with exhibiting artists, enjoy free hors d’oeuvres and take in a public viewing of Our Origins.

8pm: Join us in Grant Park for stargazing with astronomer Joe Guzman.

Admission for each event is free and open to the public. No RSVP necessary. For more information, visit our website, check in with our Facebook page or give us a call at 312-369-7104.

Plenty of Stargazing at the Opening Reception for Our Origins

Some of the earliest humans theorized about our origins by gazing up at the cosmos.

Tonight, we will continue this time-honored experience at the opening reception for the museum’s current exhibition, Our Origins, which attempts to trace our shared human past beyond recorded history.

Join us for one (or all) of three opening events:

4pm: Sit in on a gallery discussion between exhibiting artists Alison Carey, Ken Fandell, Jennifer Ray and Alison Ruttan, which will be moderated by curator Allison Grant.

5 – 7pm: Mingle with exhibiting artists, enjoy free hors d’oeuvres and take in a public viewing of Our Origins.

8pm: Join us in Grant Park for stargazing with astronomer Joe Guzman.

Admission for each event is free and open to the public. No RSVP necessary. For more information, visit our website, check in with our Facebook page or give us a call at 312-369-7104.

Allison Grant’s Curatorial Debut, Our Origins, Examines Human Evolution

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Allison Grant standing in front of SEMICONDUCTOR’s Black Rain, 2009


Allison Grant is fascinated by the way evolution shapes human nature. This fascination formed the foundation of her curatorial debut at the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Our Origins, which opens July 29, 2011.

Featuring works by Aspen Mays, Jason Lazarus and Jenny Akerlund, among others, Our Origins tackles human’s efforts to describe their nature, their shared evolutionary past and their relation to the cosmos through both artistic expression and scientific analysis.

“The show looks at humans’ attempts to trace our origins beyond recorded history and look at the questions that end up really being unanswerable,” says Grant. “I think it asks pretty big questions and it doesn’t even start to answer them. I hope people will leave with a sense of wonder.”

According to Grant, who has worked at the MoCP since 2008, the idea behind the show came to her when artist Alison Ruttan submitted a portfolio to the MoCP for review. This particular portfolio of Ruttan’s work explored the links between humans and primates that ultimately suggested a common ancestor.

“I knew I wanted to do a show about science,” says Grant, “and I knew I wanted her to be in the show. So, that was really the springboard.” From there, Grant says she began looking at other artists whose work deals with humans’ place within the cosmos, beginning with the Big Bang.

“I’m really excited about the SEMICONDUCTOR video,” says Grant. “It’s a spectacular vertical piece of footage taken from a NASA camera orbiting the Earth. It was supposed to videotape the sun, but it swings a bit and instead takes in much more of the galaxy.”

The show also includes work by Rachel Sussman, Julia Büttelmann, Alison Carey, Eric William Carroll, Michelle Ceja, Ken Fandell, Scott McFarland, Patricia Piccinini, Mark Ruwedel, Jennifer Ray and Penelope Umbrico.

In conjunction with the show, which runs through October 16, the MoCP will be hosting the following events:
• Aug. 25 at 6pm – Behavioral Brethren: Links Between Human and Non-human Primates, a conversation moderated by WBEZ’s Gabriel Spitzer between artist Alison Ruttan and Laurie Santos, PhD, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Yale University
• Sept. 8 at 4pm – Opening Reception and Gallery Talk, a discussion with artists Alison Carey, Ken Fandell, Jennifer Ray and Alison Ruttan moderated by curator Allison Grant, followed by a reception and stargazing in Grant Park with astronomer Joe Guzman
• Oct. 4 at 6pm – Beyond Visibility: Photography and Our Connection to the Cosmos, a conversation with artist Aspen Mays and Kathryn Schaffer, PhD from the University of Chicago

For more information about _Our Origins_ or its related events, please check out the MoCP website or follow us on Facebook.

Alison Carey: http://www.alisoncarey.com/
Eric William Carroll: http://ericwilliamcarroll.com/
Michelle Ceja: http://michelleceja.com/
Ken Fandell: http://www.kenfandell.com/
Scott McFarland: http://www.coolhunting.com/culture/scott-mcfarland.php
Patricia Piccinini: http://www.patriciapiccinini.net/
Mark Ruwedel: http://www.yossimilo.com/artists/mark_ruwe/?show=0&img_num=4#title
Jennifer Ray: http://www.jenniferray.net/
Penelope Umbrico: http://www.penelopeumbrico.net/
Gabriel Spitzer: http://www.wbez.org/staff/gabriel-spitzer
Laurie Santos: http://www.ted.com/talks/laurie_santos.html
Joe Guzman: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jpuvmH-7gbw
Website: http://www.mocp.org/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Museum-of-Contemporary-Photography/22279105913#!/pages/Museum-of-Contemporary-Photography/22279105913

Allison Grant’s Curatorial Debut, Our Origins, Examines Human Evolution

phpb9MAfwPM.jpg
Allison Grant standing in front of SEMICONDUCTOR’s Black Rain, 2009


Allison Grant is fascinated by the way evolution shapes human nature. This fascination formed the foundation of her curatorial debut at the Museum of Contemporary Photography, Our Origins, which opens July 29, 2011.

Featuring works by Aspen Mays, Jason Lazarus and Jenny Akerlund, among others, Our Origins tackles human’s efforts to describe their nature, their shared evolutionary past and their relation to the cosmos through both artistic expression and scientific analysis.

“The show looks at humans’ attempts to trace our origins beyond recorded history and look at the questions that end up really being unanswerable,” says Grant. “I think it asks pretty big questions and it doesn’t even start to answer them. I hope people will leave with a sense of wonder.”

According to Grant, who has worked at the MoCP since 2008, the idea behind the show came to her when artist Alison Ruttan submitted a portfolio to the MoCP for review. This particular portfolio of Ruttan’s work explored the links between humans and primates that ultimately suggested a common ancestor.

“I knew I wanted to do a show about science,” says Grant, “and I knew I wanted her to be in the show. So, that was really the springboard.” From there, Grant says she began looking at other artists whose work deals with humans’ place within the cosmos, beginning with the Big Bang.

“I’m really excited about the SEMICONDUCTOR video,” says Grant. “It’s a spectacular vertical piece of footage taken from a NASA camera orbiting the Earth. It was supposed to videotape the sun, but it swings a bit and instead takes in much more of the galaxy.”

The show also includes work by Rachel Sussman, Julia Büttelmann, Alison Carey, Eric William Carroll, Michelle Ceja, Ken Fandell, Scott McFarland, Patricia Piccinini, Mark Ruwedel, Jennifer Ray and Penelope Umbrico.

In conjunction with the show, which runs through October 16, the MoCP will be hosting the following events:
• Aug. 25 at 6pm – Behavioral Brethren: Links Between Human and Non-human Primates, a conversation moderated by WBEZ’s Gabriel Spitzer between artist Alison Ruttan and Laurie Santos, PhD, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Yale University
• Sept. 8 at 4pm – Opening Reception and Gallery Talk, a discussion with artists Alison Carey, Ken Fandell, Jennifer Ray and Alison Ruttan moderated by curator Allison Grant, followed by a reception and stargazing in Grant Park with astronomer Joe Guzman
• Oct. 4 at 6pm – Beyond Visibility: Photography and Our Connection to the Cosmos, a conversation with artist Aspen Mays and Kathryn Schaffer, PhD from the University of Chicago

For more information about _Our Origins_ or its related events, please check out the MoCP website or follow us on Facebook.