Tag Archives: James Nachtwey

Agencies and Photographers | November 2012

Agencies and Collectives

It’s not even December yet, but some Best of 2012s are out already….

VII: Best of 2012: Highlights of a Year in Pictures | ‘VII photographers present their best images, shot or released in 2012′

Best Pictures of the Year from Agence France Presse (Whittier Daily News)

European Pressphoto Agency: The Year in Images (EPA)

Reuters’ best pictures of the year is pretty cool as it includes comments by the photographers and even technical info…

Photo © Goran Tomasevic / Reuters

Photo © Goran Tomasevic / Reuters

Reuters: Best Photos of The Year 2012 (Reuters)

VII Newsletter November 2012

TerraProject Newsletter November 2012

Prime Collective: Newsletter November 2012

NOOR: Evelien Kunst becomes NOOR’s new Managing Director | news on BJP

Magnum event at Frontline Club in London : Magnum Revolution: 65 Years of Fighting for Freedom : Thursday December 13, 2012 7:00 PM

Pioneer photo agency Sipa Press files for bankruptcy protection (BJP)

Katie Orlinsky joins Reportage by Getty Images as a Featured Photographer

Tommaso Protti joins Emerging Talent at Reportage by Getty Images

Firecracker November 2012

Photographers

Trailer to the upcoming McCulling documentary…Very much looking forward to seeing the film at some point…In the mean time I’ll be reading his autobiography Unreasonable Behaviour.

Trailer to the documentary ‘McCullin’ (Guardian) ‘Watch the world exclusive trailer for David and Jacqui Morris’s documentary on British photographer Don McCullin, whose acclaimed work for the Observer and the Sunday Times in Vietnam, Biafra, Cyprus and Lebanon produced some of the defining images of war. McCullin describes the ‘moral sense of purpose and duty’ behind his work. McCullin is released in the UK on 1 January 2013′

Somewhere to Disappear with Alec Soth

Looks like Contrasto has pushed the publication of James Nachtwey’s Pietas forward until September 2013… Was supposed to come out late October… Shame. Was on my wish list for Santa…

James Nachtwey: Pietas 

Reckoning at the Frontier by Eros Hoagland (Kickstarter crowdfunding) ‘Reckoning at the Frontier is an upcoming photography book that explores the drug war in northern Mexico.’

Workshop : Photographic storytelling with Sebastian Meyer and Anastasia Taylor-Lind : 7 December, London(Guardian) ‘Two eminent, widely published and very different photojournalists give a Guardian Masterclass in telling stories with images.’

Photo © Maysun

Maysun

Jordi Ruiz Cicera

David Vintiner

Matilde Gattoni

Hiroyuki Ito

Nicola Lo Calzo

Howard Schatz

Andrew Lichtenstein

Matthew Niederhauser

Lindsay Mackenzie

Andrea Frazzetta

Narciso Contreras

Georgina Cranston

Mark Seager

Matt Carr

Michal Solarski

Laura Pannack new website

Duncan Nicol Robertson

Mark Hartman

Mark Hartman on Verve

Paul Taggart on Verve

Pavel Prokopchik on Verve

Philipp Spalek  on Verve

Daniel Hartley-Allen on Verve

Linda Dorigo on Verve

Pascal Maitre

Matteo di Giovanni

Sebastiano Tomada Piccolomini

Greta Pratt

Toufic Beyhum

Emine Ziyatdinova

Artur Conka

Agencies and Photographers | October 2012

Agencies and Collectives

Congratulations to Reportage by Getty Images for their 5-year anniversary.. Their editors have put together a slideshow to mark the occasion, showcasing work by the agency’s represented and featured photographers. …Includes the below classic by one of my favourites, Shaul Schwarz…

Nairobi, Kenya. 2008. © Shaul Schwarz

Reportage by Getty Images: Five Years Old

E-version of the first issue of the agency’s recently launched Reportage magazine….I picked up a print version in Perpignan…Definitely worth checking out…

Photos © Jonathan Torgovnik

Reportage : Reportage by Getty Images magazine

They have a revamped Tumblr too…

Reportage by Getty Images new Tumblr site

VII: Newsletter November 2012 | Newsletter October 2012

VII Photo’s collaboration with Think Outside the Cell (BJP)

Magnum Photo newsletter

Still two months until the end of the year, but NOOR have already done a Year in Review….

NOOR: Year in Review

NOOR: Newsletter October 2012

NOOR celebrates fifth anniversary with Blurb book project (Blurb blog)

Photo seen on the newsletter © Abbie Trayler-Smith

Panos Pictures Newsletter

Prime Collective: Newsletter October 2012

Terra Project newsletter

This looks terrific. I need to get myself an iPad.

Reuters – The Wider Image App | Reuters’ The Wider Image app (editorsweblog.org) ‘New storytelling for photojournalism’ | Reuters releases Wider Image iPad app (BJP)

Carlyle Group completes Getty Images acquisition (BJP)

Addretouch, post-production

Photographers

Dedicated website to Stephanie Sinclair’s and Jessica Dimmock’s Too Young To Wed project.

Photo © Stephanie Sinclair

Stephanie Sinclair and Jessica Dimmock : Too Young to Wed

James Nachtwey has a new book out today…

James Nachtwey: Pietas (Contrasto) [link to Amazon]

Group project on Afghanistan by impressive list of contributing photographers

Photo seen on the front page © Jonathan Saruk

Razistan | Land of Secrets

Group project on Scotland…

Document Scotland

Saw a friend mention on Facebook that Stephen Shore just launched his first ever website…If indeed true, certainly worth visiting, no?

Stephen Shore

Manu Brabo

Eric Bouvet

Brian Finke

Mike Berube

Lauren Decicca

Julian Germain

Bharat Sikka

Melissa Cacciola

Vittoria Mentasti

Tarrah Krajnak

Brian Driscoll

Thomas Locke Hobbs

Giulia Marchi

Tadej Znidarcic

Jesse Neider

Zac Baillie

Tim Mitchell

Photo © Misha Friedman

Misha Friedman on Verve

David Chancellor on Verve

Alejandro Kirchuk on Verve

Lexey Swall on Verve

Jeremy Sutton-Hibbert on Verve

Massimiliano Clausi on Verve

Mackenzie Reiss on Verve

Pauline Beugnies on Verve

Alvaro Deprit on Verve

Photo © Andew Burton

Andrew Burton on Verve

Allison Joyce on Verve

Andrew Kelly on Verve

Fara Phoebe Zetzsche on Verve

Nadia Sablin on Verve

Myriam Meloni on Verve

Titus Simoens on Verve

Benedicte Desrus on Verve

Maciej Dakowicz: Cardiff After Dark (book) [link to Amazon]

Toby Smith : showreel

Pete Marovich crowdfunding on Kickstarter for project Shadows of the Gullah

Some website updates…

Antonio Olmos new website | new blog

Cathal McNaughton new website

Kiana Hayeri new website

Conor O’Leary new website

Valentin Bianchi new website

James Arthur Allen new website

Marta Wanatko

Peter van Agtmael Receives the 2012 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography

On Wednesday night, Magnum photographer Peter van Agtmael received the $30,000 W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography at the School of Visual Arts in New York City, joining a legion of photojournalists that includes James Nachtwey, Paolo Pellegrin and Brenda Ann Kenneally. Established in 1978, the W. Eugene Smith Grant is one of the most esteemed in the industry, named after the legendary photographer whose harrowing pictures of World War II gave an unparalleled and poignant view of the human toll of the conflict. In a fitting tribute, the annual grant aims to recognize a photographerwho has demonstrated an exemplary commitment to documenting the human condition in the spirit of Smiths concerned photography and dedicated compassion.

Van Agtmael has done that with his long-term project, Disco Night September 11, which focuses on the recent wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and their consequences within the United States. But it was his existing work along with his proposalto show the side of the ongoing wars through Iraqi and Afghan perspectivesthat earned him this years honor. An additional $5,000 fellowship was awarded to photographer Massimo Berruti for The Dusty Path, a combination of works examining victims of drone strikes, missing persons and the fight against militancy in Pakistani classrooms.

At 24the same age as many of the soldiers he would go on to documentvan Agtmael began the project during an embed with Americantroops engaged in heavy fighting around Mosul, Iraq.As an American of the generation shouldering these wars, I feel a strong responsibility to document their cost,” says the photographer, whose lens captured everythingfrom violent firefights and days-long foot patrols to the rehabilitation of those maimed by war.”Over the course of my lifetime, I intend to keep returning to [these conflicts] to create a comprehensive document.

To that end, van Agtmael, now 31, plans to use his grant to capture the other side of the conflictto give face to our ‘enemies’ in the fight. “Im ready to shift my focus to the other side of the war,” he says. “The Iraqis and Afghans that have been most affected remain depersonalized and shadowy in our collective consciousness. We live in a self-absorbed cultureone largely unburdened by memory.

Van Agtmael plans to return to Iraq and Afghanistan to follow these stories, but will also travel to the Middle East and Europe in hopes of documenting their diaspora. He’s timed the conclusion of his project to the American withdrawal from Afghanistan in 2014another reminder of the human sacrifice and cost of the war. Heplans to use photographs, video, audio and text to share the entire range of what hes witnessed over the last seven years; still, van Agtmael maintains it’s a small shred of the whole. “Most stories will remain forever anonymous, and I’m very grateful to the W. Eugene Smith Grant for the opportunity to document the stories that would otherwise go unseen,” he says. Ive seen a nasty and primal side of mankind, but its been balanced by enough displays of extraordinary humanity to give me hope.”

The $30,000W. Eugene Smith Grant in Humanistic Photography is given once per year along with an additional$5000fellowship to a second recipient. blog comment . LightBox previously featured the work of 2011 Smith Grant Award winner Krisanne Johnson.

Side by Side | Sniper taking aim from within a home by Nachtwey, Bosnia 1993, and Tomasevic, Syria 2012

Goran Tomasevic of Reuters has been doing amazing work in Aleppo, Syria during the past week. One of his photos from yesterday showing a FSA sniper taking a position inside a living room reminded me of a James Nachtwey frame from Bosnia, which has a sniper inside a bedroom.

Left: 1993. article writing submission . Mostar James Nachtwey
Right: 2012. directory submission . Aleppo Goran Tomasevic / Reuters

Tomasevic also shot the above FSA sniper right up close (see for instance, here) and most websites seemed to go with that, but I actually prefer this wide version published in today’s International Herald Tribune (Europe edition).

The Gold Standard: James Nachtwey Photographs China’s Female Weight Lifters

When Chinese scouts set out to recruit athletes for their national women’s weight-lifting team in the late 1990s, they had specific criteria in mind. Calculated research had given them the perfect profile: stoic, quick, powerful and, of course, strong. By 2000, China had one of the most powerful teams in the world, and today, China’s female weight lifters are expected to dominate their competition in London.

(For daily coverage of the 2012 Games, visit TIME’s Olympics blog.)

In May, TIME sent contract photographer James Nachtwey to Beijing to photograph the national women’s weight-lifting team as it prepared for London. The photographs document the making of elite athletes in a country that has quickly become an Olympic powerhouse, earning the most gold medals of any nation in 2008’s Beijing Games.

Nachtwey’s images put faces to China’s supercharged athletic program. Photographed from behind, the arms, legs and shoulders of one team member look as solid as the massive weights she holds, with seemingly little effort, in her calloused hands. In another, Wang Mingjuan, a tiny woman at just 48 kg (106 lb.), lifts a burden that looks as if it would easily stump amateur weight lifters twice her size.

To explain China’s success in the sport, the national team’s coach Xu Jingfa offers a simple explanation: “We do everything together, and we work harder than everyone else.”

That hard work includes six-day weeks of all-day training. The 30 members of the national team wake together at 6:30 a.m. and begin a marathon schedule of exercise, physical therapy and classes that range from weight-lifting techniques to “ideological education.” Weight lifting has consumed their lives since they began training at age 10 or 11. In London, it will become clear just how much this dedication will pay off for China’s strongest women.

Read more about China’s Olympic athletes at TIME.com.

James Nachtwey is a TIME contract photographer who has covered Sept. 11 and the 2011 Japanese tsunami, among other topics, for the magazine. He was awarded the 2012 Dresden Peace Prize.

Interviews and Talks | 7 June 2012

The Afrikaner Blood ©  Ilvy Njiokiktjien and Elles van Gelder.
World Press Photo 2012 contest Multimedia Prize winner.

World Press Photo 2012 Contest Winners interviewed (World Press Photo)

Jamie, Wellford, Newsweek‘s Senior International photo editor (PhotoShelter)

Stephen Shore (Phaidon)

Ben Lowy (ICP Vimeo)

Ben Lowy (NYT Lens)

Photo ©  Jacob Aue Sobol

Jacob Aue Sobol : Arrivals and Departures pt1,  pt2 , pt3, pt4, pt5 (Leica blog)

VII photographers in conversation at the Frontline (Phaidon)

Stephen Mayes (Phaidon)

Stephen Mayes (Pictureline)

Tom Stoddart, Peter Dench and Aidan Sullivan, Reportage by Getty Images at Frontline Club (Reportage Tumblr)

James Nachtwey (The Darthmouth.com)

Joachim Ladefoged (A Photo Editor)

Charles Ommanney (itele.fr)

Photo  ©  Jason P. Howe / ConflictPics

Jason P. Howe (FotoEvidence)

Yuri Kozyrev (PDN)

Ashley Gilbertson (PDN)

Peter Dench (PDN)

Robin Hammond (allAfrica.com)

Susan Meiselas (burn)

Alex Webb (Vogue)

Rene Burri (Phaidon)

Rene Burri (Phaidon)

David Burnett (ThaloTV)

Annie Leibovitz (Guardian)

Joao Silva (Dcist)

JR (Ted)

Pieter Hugo (Guernica)

Mitch Epstein (BBC)

Photo © Ed Kashi

Ed Kashi (Guardian)

Ed Kashi (Vimeo)

In the Picture: 25 Years of Panos Pictures (Frontline Club YouTube)

Carolyn Drake (Turkiye’de Zaman)

Vanessa Winship (Turkiye’de Zaman)

George Georgiou (Turkiye’de Zaman)

Chris de Bode (Dutch TV)

Pete Muller, Brief Reflections on OPC Awards Ceremony (Photographer’s blog)

Photo © Andrea Gjestvang

Andrea Gjestvang (B&H)

Dana Popa (BBC)

Dana Popa (Foto8)

Nicole Tung (NYT Lens)

Laura El-Tantawy (Dvafoto)

Ciara Leeming (Centrepoint Collective)

Laura Pannack (Ideas Tap)

Lee Karen Stow (BBC)

GMB Akash (123Clicks)

Rafal Milach (rbth.ru)

Photo © Simon Roberts

Photographers Abbie Trayler-Smith, Carol Allen Storey, Liz Hingley, Simon Roberts and Laura Pannack discuss their work in the Our Lives photography series about children living in the UK commissioned by Save the Children. (Save the Children YouTube)

James Nachtwey, 2009 (YouTube)

Frits van Eldik (CPN)

Diver & Aguilar (luxurysociety.com)

John Fulton (featureshoot)

Edward Linsmier (4ormat.com)

Side by Side | ICRC Centre Kabul by Yuri Kozyrev 2012 and James Nachtwey 2009

TIME just posted Yuri Kozyrev’s work from Afghanistan on Lightbox, under the title ‘Afghanistan Now’, some of which is featured in this week’s print issue, dated 11 June 2012 to accompany Aryn Baker’s article  on President Hamid Karzai headlined ‘On His Own’.

Frame 14 in the Kozyrev’s  slideshow from ICRC orthophedic centre in Kabul gave a me flashback to a James Nachtwey frame from the same place taken in 2009 for an ICRC campaign to mark their 150th anniversary.

Many similarities in the photographs, but looking at them side-by-side and seeing two amputees from different generations also provides a pretty sad reflexion of not just an issue continuing to face the people of Afghanistan but perhaps the state of the country in wider sense.

Orthophedic center of the International Committee of the Red Cross in Kabul.
Left: © Yuri Kozyrev, 2012.
Right: ©  James Nachtwey, 2009.

Articles | Saturday 19 May 2012

Olivier writing here. This is my first post for Photojournalism Links. I’ve been a long-time follower of Mikko’s work, which has, over the years, proved to be an amazing resources for photojournalists and photo editors. It’s my pleasure to help Mikko update and develop the site further, and we’re already planning new things for the site. Stay tuned.

Let’s get started.

First things first, if you happen to be in London this coming week, head for the Frontline Club, which is holding a series of photography events, including VII Photo’s seminar (Hint: if you’re looking to buy the agency’s latest book Questions Without Answers, you’ll get the opportunity to get it signed by a lot of the their photographers!) Reportage by Getty Images will also be there with a couple of events, including a discussion with Peter Dench, Tom Stoddart and Aidan Sullivan. Finally, on 24 May, there’s the Panos Pictures Networking Party.

Washington Post: Vogue’s flattering article on Syria’s first lady is scrubbed from Web. The images used by Vogue were shot by James Nachtwey. A copy of the article is hosted by a website called President Assad here. In the Washington Post’s article, it’s mentioned that Assad’s children aren’t actually his but decoys planted for security reasons.

Examiner: The picture of dishonesty: social media slaps down a wedding photo faker.

Walk Your Camera: Perpetuating the Visual Myth of Appalachia – or how a photographer reacts to a very bad edit, done by CNN, of her work.

Martin Parr: Too Much Photography.

Photobooth at The New Yorker: Will Steacy’s Photographs Not Taken continues to make the rounds, this time with The New Yorker publishing Nina Berman’s story of Cathy, who she met in London in the 1990s.

Cover of “Photographs Not Taken”

PBS: Photojournalists Scramble to Video. Is it worth it? 

“Video storytelling is different in execution than still photography, without a doubt. But it has been well-established that very talented still photographers can make the transition back and forth between the media and enhance their visual reporting,” says Sean D. Elliot, president of the National Press Photographers Association.

A Photo Editor: Is it Time to Eliminate Stills From Your Shoot?

BJP: Lange-Taylor Prize Gets a Facelift, relaunches in 2013.

A lot of talk about Hipstamatic, Instagram, and all-things Lomography in recent weeks, especially since Facebook paid $1.2bn for Instagram, so here we go:

NYT Lens: Benjamin Lowy: Virtually Unfiltered. The article that brought back the whole Hipstamatic debate on the table.

Conscientious: On the Hipstamatic Journalist. Joerg Colberg wonders how The New York Times can publish Hipstamatic images without it violating its strict rules about photo manipulation.

NYT: Everyone’s Lives, in Instagram Pictures. Karen Rosenberg tries to answer the question: “Why do we want to tweak our pictures so conspicuously?”

NYT: Lomography, an Analog Company Surviving in a Digital World.

Time Lightbox: Lomography and the “Analogue Future”.

San Francisco Chronicle: Hipstamatic Founders Lucas Buick, Ryan Dorshorst. An interview with the founders of the controversial app, and their plans for the future, including the release of an iPad magazine with interviews of star photographers using Hipstamatic.

Slate: In Defense of Instagram: Why News Photography Goes Well With Vintage-Filtered Cat Pic. An older article (March 2012), but felt it was needed in this context.

PetaPixel: IKEA Cardboard Camera Called KNAPPA To Land on Store Shelves Soon. Even Ikea is going into the cheap digital camera market.

BJP: New app bring lossless “developed raw” images to the iPhone.

Even about Instagram and Hipstamatic. Last week, there was an auction to help the family of Anton Hammerl, who was killed in Libya a year ago.

BBC: War photographer Anton Hammerl remembered at auction. A video of the auction and interviews with family, friends and colleagues.

NYT Lens: At Christie’s, an Auction for Anton.

Time Lightbox: Robert Capa, Friend of Anton.

Talking about Robert Capa…

The Guardian: Robert Capa and Gerda Taro: love in a time of war.

In Spain, Capa soon developed a reputation for taking photographs whatever the risk, setting the tone for war reportage as we now know it. Taro, too, was often seen running across the battle lines with her camera, her bravery matched by her recklessness. She travelled back and forth to the frontlines, shooting what she saw, often driven by a mixture of humanity, political commitment and a shrewd understanding of the power of the photograph to shape public opinion.

Fred Stein Archive/Getty Images

Time Lightbox: Overseas Press Club Award Winners Announced. Including the Robert Capa Gold Medal Award, which went to André Liohn.

Channel 4 News: Death in a time of life. Jon Snow remembers Marie Colvin, who was killed in Syria earlier this year.

NYT Lens: Parting Glance: Horst Faas.

Photo by Horst Faas / AP Photo.

PDN: Horst Faas, AP Combat Photographer, Dies age 79.

Panos Pictures: Robin Hammond Released From Prison in Zimbabwe. After being held for two weeks in Zimbabwe, Robin Hammond has been released and is back in Paris, safe and sound. I’m looking forward to seeing the images he came back with after spending two years documenting this country.

NYT Lens: A Ride Cloaked in Secrecy. I love this kind of articles, giving us a behind-the-scenes look at the news, especially when it has a West Wing kind of vibe. Here, we get the background on how a photographer reported on President Obama’s secretive trip to Afghanistan.

The Guardian: What happens when a photojournalist travels to revisit his subjects?

NYT Lens: The Eddie Adams Workshop’s 25th Year.

NYT Lens: Touring the Nanny-Photographer’s Past. Yet another article about Vivian Maier.

Chicago Tribune: The Great John H. White.

Firecracker: Olivia Arthur. Chosen for her excellent Jeddah Diary, the photographer’s first book.

Photo by Olivia Arthur.

The Guardian: Richard Mosse’s best shot.

Photo by Richard Mosse / Institute.

The Guardian: Saatchi captures the confusion of contemporary photography.

“The title, Out of Focus, may have been meant ironically, but it takes on a more pointed meaning if you approach the show as a mirror of the fractured world of contemporary practice.”

Wall Street Journal: The Surreal Selling of Man Ray.

PhotoShelter: Photography Through the Eyes of Art Directors.

PhotoShelter: The 40+ Items Every Photography Assistants Needs Now.

A few articles about photographers’ rights and copyrights:

Time Lightbox: Fight for Your Right: Resources for Photographers Covering Protests (note: it’s mainly for US-based photographers).

Nancy L. Ford Blog: Why NOT to give away your copyrights.

BJP: More than $120,000,000 at stake in AFP v. Morel case.

The Russian Photos Blog: Agence France Presse vs Morel: “AFP Got Caught With A Hand In The Cookie Jar And Will Have To Pay” Out of 200 pages of legal documents filed by both Daniel Morel and Agence France-Presse / Getty Images, this sentence, written by an AFP employee is by far the one that caught the attention of the industry. I’ve used it in my standfirst as well, and A Photo Editor picked up as well.

BJP: Leica introduces a black-and-white digital M9 camera.

And to finish, a 100-minute documentary about Helmut Newton from Frames From The Edge. Of course, it’s best watched in full-screen.

And a 60-minute interview with Michele Hadlow, Forbes’ Senior Photo Editor on How to Shoot Powerful Portraits of Powerful People.

Finally, congratulations to photographers Karim Ben Khelifa and Finbarr O’Reilly. Both have been selected as International Nieman Fellows for the Class of 2013 at Harvard. Ben Khelifa will “conduct research on journalist-audience engagement, analyze the behavioral economics linked to crowdfunding and study new business models promoting the diversification of visual storytelling.” While O’Reilly will “study psychology to better understand how the human mind and behavior is affected by personal experience, with a focus on trauma and conflict zones.”