Tag Archives: Irving Penn

Philip Heying, 1223 Pennsylvania Street seen from the alley

Philip Heying, 1223 Pennsylvania Street seen from the alley

Philip Heying

1223 Pennsylvania Street seen from the alley,
Lawrence, Kansas, 2012
From the Within a two mile radius for one year series
Website – PhilipHeying.com

Philip Heying is a photographer living in Lawrence, Kansas. In 1980, he met William S. Burroughs and began a friendship that endured until Burroughs’s death in 1997. Burroughs and his circle of friends, from Albert Hoffman and Allen Ginsberg, to Brion Gysin and Timothy Leary provided artistic insight and guidance. Soon after college, curiosity to experience another culture led Heying to France, via coal freighter. Since then his work has been exhibited and published internationally. Heying returned to the U.S. in 1997, settling in Brooklyn, New York, and became an assistant to Irving Penn until the Spring of 2001. In the fall of 2008, he returned from Brooklyn to Kansas to live closer to his family and pursue an idea for a photographic survey that began during a visit in the fall of 2005. He is currently employed as a professor of photography at Johnson County Community College and recently completed a body of photographs of the surprising variety of architecture, cultural and environmental processes to be found within walking distance from his home.
 

Philip Heying, Microburst storm over Burroughs Creek

Philip Heying, Microburst storm over Burroughs Creek

Philip Heying

Microburst storm over Burroughs Creek ,
Lawrence, Kansas, 2009
From the SWEETHEART, IS EVERYTHING O.K.? series
Website – PhilipHeying.com

Philip Heying is a photographer living in Lawrence, Kansas. In 1980, he met William S. Burroughs and began a friendship that endured until Burroughs’s death in 1997. Burroughs and his circle of friends, from Albert Hoffman and Allen Ginsberg, to Brion Gysin and Timothy Leary provided artistic insight and guidance. Soon after college, curiosity to experience another culture led Heying to France, via coal freighter. Since then his work has been exhibited and published internationally. Heying returned to the U.S. in 1997, settling in Brooklyn, New York, and became an assistant to Irving Penn until the Spring of 2001. In the fall of 2008, he returned from Brooklyn to Kansas to live closer to his family and pursue an idea for a photographic survey that began during a visit in the fall of 2005. He is currently employed as a professor of photography at Johnson County Community College and working on a body of photographs of the surprising variety of architecture, cultural and environmental processes to be found within walking distance from his home.
 

Sarah Moon: Film Screenings

540true
dots
under
332true
true
800http://www.aperture.org/exposures/wp-content/plugins/thethe-image-slider/style/skins/frame-white
  • 5000
    fade
    false
    60
    bottom
    30

    Slide1

  • 5000
    fade
    false
    60
    bottom
    30

    Slide2

?

“Moon’s voice, above all, is an intensely personal one, whispering, rather than shouting, about an imagined world where preternaturally lovely, romanesque heroines inhabit isolated and, more often than not, fictional landscapes.” — “Frocks and Fantasy: The Photographs of Sarah Moon

It wasn’t until sometime around 1970 that Sarah Moon, the award-winning artist, photographer and filmmaker, first picked up a camera. Her first photographs were portraits of friends – who also happened to be models. She at the time was working as a model as well, (in London and Paris, 1960-1966) working among some of fashion photography’s most legendary names, Helmut Newton, Irving Penn and Guy Bourdin included. “Somebody lent me a camera,” she says, “and while we waited between shots, I took pictures.”

More than forty years later, her ethereal and enigmatic images are those of a living legend, whose uniquely individual vision informed publications like Nova and the Sunday Times Magazine, later that of the fashion house Maison Cacharel. Her work has appeared everywhere from French Elle to British Vogue, in collaboration with designer names from Chanel to Comme des Garcons. Moon’s body of work, which includes commercial photography, as well as celebrated works in video and film, has exhibited worldwide since 1982. These films—many based upon fairy tales—are a testament to her grande dame status, the years-earned luxury of creative autonomy.

All images © copyright Sara Moon, Little Red Riding Hood

Aperture, in conjunction with Howard Greenberg Gallery, is pleased to present an evening of film and videos by the award-winning artist. Sarah Moon will be present at Aperture Gallery to screen The Red Thread, Black Riding Hood, and Le Montreur D’Images (The Go-Between), a documentary on her husband, the celebrated publisher Robert Delpire, whose own legacy is the subject of the concurrent multi-venue exhibition, Delpire & Co.

———

Sarah Moon: Film Screenings
Friday, May 11, 2012

6:00 pm

FREE

Aperture Gallery and Bookstore
New York, New York

6:00The Red Thread and Black Riding Hood
6:30: Intermission
7:00Le Montreur D’Images (The Go-Between)

›› Le Montreur D’Images will also be continuously screened as part of the exhibition Delpire & Co. at Aperture Gallery and Bookstore, on view May 10–July 19, 2012.

›› Sarah Moon: Now and Then will be on view at Howard Greenberg Gallery,  May 11–June 16, 2012.

Traveling Exhibitions: Pennsylvania, Oregon, Kansas

Aperture has long been recognized as an excellent source for quality traveling exhibitions to museums, university galleries, libraries, and art centers around the world.  The foundation has a prestigious roster of exhibitions available at any given time, currently there are ten different exhibitions moving around the world and another four that are currently in development. These exhibitions reflect the diversity of our book program including monographic exhibitions from masters of the medium such as Bruce Davidson and Alex Webb to exciting group shows including The New York Times Magazine Photographs, a never before seen collection of some of the greatest photography ever published in the Magazine and reGeneration 2 a  introduction to the most promising photographers of the next generation. See below for more details on where our exhibitions are currently on view.

 

Dawoud Bey: Class Pictures

Odalys, 2007 by Dawoud Bey

Dawoud Bey’s Class Pictures are portraits of American adolescence across the social, economic and racial spectrum. Now on display at Silver Eye Center for Photography in Pittsburgh, PA, the 40 x 30 inch color prints are paired with page-long statements written by the subjects–sometimes touching, sometimes funny, sometimes harrowing–that deepen our understanding of the most awkward age.

Tuesday, January 10, 2012–Saturday, March 10, 2012

Silver Eye Center for Photography
1015 East Carson Street
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
(412) 431-1810

 

The Edge of Vision: Abstraction in Contemporary Photography

PushPins, 2002 by Ellen Carey

The Ronna and Eric Hoffman Gallery at Lewis and Clark College in Portland, OR presents The Edge of Vision: Abstraction in Color Photography. Photographs and photo-based installations, many exhibited for the first time, “explore the territory of ‘undisclosed’ or abstract imagery in all its forms.” Single-artist installations examine the photographic process and visual culture in an effort to discover new optical possibilities and meaning-making.

Thursday, January 19, 2012–Sunday, March 18, 2012

Ronna and Eric Hoffman Gallery, Lewis and Clark College
0615 S.W. Palantine Hill Rd.
Portland, Oregon
(503) 768-7687

 

Chuck Close: A Couple of Ways of Doing Something

Self Portrait, 2004 by Chuck Close

In Witchita, KA, the Witchita Art Museum presents A Couple of Ways of Doing Somethingfifteen of Chuck Close’s intimate daguerreotype portraits of influential contemporary artists alongside Bob Holman’s beautifully typeset poems.  In addition, Close a curator has included examples of his other works taken from each daguerreotype in a variety of media, including tapestries and photogravures.

Sunday, January 29, 2012–Sunday, April 15, 2012

Wichita Art Museum
1400 West Museum Boulevard
Wichita, Kansas
(316) 268-4980

 

 

We update all traveling exhibition schedules on a regular basis on our website here and here.  Please feel free to contact Annette Booth, Exhibitions Manager at 212.946.7128 or at [email protected] for further information on hosting an exhibition at your venue!

Photographer #402: Stefan Milev

Stefan Milev, 1981, Bulgaria, is a very productive fashion and fine-art photographer based in Paris, France. He spend seven years assisting major photographers around the globe and worked as a photographer in New York for a period of three years. He wants his images to resemble paintings and includes a sense of mystery and beauty, trying to capture emotion, mystic and soul. He wants the photographs to be simple and unique. He is heavily inspired by the great photographers of the 19th and 20th century as Alvin Langdon Coburn, George Seeley, Peter Lindbergh, Irving Penn and Helmut Newton. His images have appeared in magazines and publications as Tranoï Magazine, DERZEIT Magazine and Qvest. The following images come from various different shoots.


Website: www.stefanmilev.com

The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the W.M. Hunt Collection


Carrie Levy, Untitled from “Domestic Stages,” 2004. Courtesy the artist.

The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the W. M. Hunt Collection is now on view at the George Eastman House, International Museum of Photography and Film. This is the largest exhibition in the museum’s history with more than 500 “magical images of people in which the eyes cannot be seen” and is the first major U.S. showing of The Unseen Eye. The featured works range from daguerreotype to digital by photographers such as Berenice Abbot, Richard Avedon, Robert Frank, Lee Friedlander, Annie Leibovitz, Robert Mapplethorpe, Irving Penn, among many more. This exhibition coincides with the release of the stunning Aperture publication The Unseen Eye.

Unseen in “The Unseen Eye,” An Evening with Susan Bright and W. M. Hunt
Wednesday, October 12, 2011, 7 pm
SVA Theatre, 333 West 23rd St, New York, New York
Free and open to the public

The Unseen Eye: A Life in Photographs and other digressions …
a multi-media performance piece with W.M. Hunt
Friday, October 28, 2011, 7 pm
Aperture Gallery, 547 West 27th Street, New York, New York
Free and open to the public but please RSVP at [email protected]

W.M. Hunt is a champion of photography— a collector, curator, consultant, writer, teacher, and fundraiser who lives and works in New York City. He was a founding partner of the prominent photography gallery Hasted Hunt in Chelsea, Manhattan and served as director of photography at Ricco/Maresca gallery. His new book The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the Unconscious (Aperture) focuses on Collection Dancing Bear, currently his largest collection of photographs.

Exhibition on view: Saturday, October 1, 2011–Sunday, February 19, 2012

Museum admission: $12 adults, $10 seniors, and $5 students

George Eastman House
900 East Avenue
Rochester, New York
(585) 271-3361

Click here to find W.M Hunt’s book, The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the Unconscious (Aperture), now on sale!

Read Elizabeth Avedon’s interview with W.M. Hunt about his collection in La Lettre de la Photographie. Find out more about her visit on her blog.

 

Review: Sunday by Paul Kooiker

PaulKooiker_Sunday.jpg

Paul Kooiker is on a mission. I don’t know what kind of mission it is, but if you look at the books he has produced you realize he’s on a mission alright. After Crush or Room Service, there now is Sunday, a book of nudes, or maybe more accurately photographs of a nude woman, balancing precariously on a wooden table in a rather unattractive backyard of sorts. (more)

I’m not the biggest fan of dragging out obligatory and thus tiresome references, but there is a big echo of Hans Bellmer and his photographs of self-assembled and rather strange looking dolls. Much has been written about Bellmer (here is an example if you really want to subject yourself to that). Maybe me not knowing enough causes me to be a bit weary of some of the explanations and/or theories. But many just seem to embellish what actually might just have been a somewhat unhealthy idea of sexuality, quite independent of the Surrealist background and of whether or not the Nazis approved of the work (of course, they didn’t).

That’s the problem with references, they don’t necessarily always teach you quite as much as you think. Which is why I’m going to throw in yet another, very different one: Irving Penn’s Nudes. Initially, I looked at Sunday back to front, and the Bellmer reference seemed to make a lot of sense. But looking in the actual direction, and looking at how the sequence mirrors the model’s movements, Bellmer seems like a red herring, to throw us off.

Well, whatever it is, the book of course needs to be seen against the background of photography over the past, let’s say 100 years, with elements of the photographic nude, images of the human body, imaging the human body (in photography almost inevitably men taking photographs of naked women), sexuality, voyeurism thrown into the mix. It’s not obvious where Sunday fits in there. If it was obvious, the book would merely be illustrating a concept (maybe it is, and I am now embellishing?). So I’m not entirely sure what to make of the book, which is good: I’ll have to come back to it.

Sunday, photographs by Paul Kooiker, 84 pages, Van Zoetendaal Gallery, 2011

Still life: Philip-Lorca diCorcia’s breathtaking and outlandish fashion photography for ‘W’ magazine

Here he talks psychology, surrealism and serendipity with Edward Helmore
Original Post by independent.co.uk
Dancers from the Tropicana club pose in a dilapidated house. The image was published in the March 2000 issue of W

COURTESY OF PHILIP-LORCA DICORCIA AND DAVID ZWIRNER, NEW YORK
Dancers from the Tropicana club pose in a dilapidated house. The image was published in the March 2000 issue of W

In 1997, the celebrated New York artist Philip-Lorca diCorcia received an invitation to shoot for the fashion magazine W. Well known in art circles for a brand of surrealistic imagery both acutely controlled and dependent on improvisation, the artist collaborated with W’s creative director Dennis Freedman for the next 13 years, pulling off 11 shoots in locations from Cuba to Los Angeles, Bangkok to Cairo.

Two dozen of the images are currently on display at David Zwirner in New York, and the entire collection of 150 images will be published in ELEVEN: W Stories 1997-2008, out next month. Collectively, they form a survey of a moment in fashion photography that unleashed it from its primary purpose †to create a show-and-tell for clothes †and allowed it to tell almost entirely random stories, often with dark psychological undertones. If every magazine has a photographic template †Guy Bourdin and Helmut Newton for French Vogue, for instance, Irving Penn and Richard Avedon for the US edition †diCorcia established W’s art-fashion credentials. longboard complete . The series came to an end in 2008, a year before W was set back on a more conventionally commercial path.

Thai transvestites in a surreal after-dark street scene shot in Bangkok, for the September 2001 issue of W

The model Nadja Auermann is found in a Bangkok sweatshop; a male model who later turns out to be a hustler showers in front of prim Park Avenue women; the designer Marc Jacobs sits on a bed as a man sleeps; a woman in a wedding dress climbs a stepladder in Sao Paulo; three Thai drag queens pose in sailor suits behind plate glass; a woman (the supermodel Kristen McMenamy) stands in a glass house in LosAngeles.

Fantasy scenarios are nothing new to fashion, but these are distant cousins to the model-with-happy-tribesmen template. In many, fashion seems to have been forgotten altogether. The psychological story, however, is always apparent †“being a little obvious is not a bad thing in this particular realm,” the artist remarks, surveying an image of a woman with a blank expression standing in a suburban house and garden †the quintessential spiritual void. “The environment is meant to reflect a psychology †in this case she’s a prisoner in a sterile world. She didn’t need much motivation †I think she was that.”

He continues: “I think of these people as characters and every character has a psychology. I don’t photograph models in the usual way, with all that prancing and jumping, so inevitably they ask me what to do. I don’t want them standing there looking glum; I want them to understand the narrative arc of what we’re trying to get at even if we don’t understand it ourselves.”

There are echoes of Caravaggio and Goya, painters who used light for symbolic meaning, in diCorcia’s central (and much-immitated) innovation; mixing ambient and artificial light in still photographs. After receiving an MBA in fine art from Yale in 1979, he began to establish a reputation as a photographer.

Initially diCorcia placed his friends within fictional tableaux. Then, using lights secreted in the pavement, he began illuminating anonymous strangers against populous street scenes. The sense of detachment which is key to his work was sustained through each of his early series †Hustlers, Streetwork, Heads, A Storybook Life, and Lucky Thirteen. “I did the first series and missed it when I wasn’t doing it. Most people don’t pay attention, but I found it fascinating standing there on the street.”

Despite the technical control of the photographs, it is surprising how much of diCorcia and Freedman’s decade of adventure fashion was left to chance. As the artist explains, “We were always supposed to have some kind of concrete programme, but the concrete programme is only good til the first day you get there.”

Some of the strongest shots in the book, such as the society ladies lunching with the hustler in the Windows on the World restaurant atop the Twin Towers, came about through luck. “We’d built a set in a studio and after a couple of days I was getting claustrophobic and wanted to break out. Someone knew the manager of Windows on the World so we went there.”

There’s a certain decadence to the images. W is now a different animal and its personnel have dispersed. Commercial magazines, now highly focused on the bottom-line, no longer have the freedom from advertisers or the budgets to indulge these exercises. The introduction of digital photography has replaced paper and chemicals, but perhaps something has been lost in the process. Hyper-reality has in a sense become the norm, and not necessarily for the better in diCorcia’s view.

“One of the things about [traditional] photography is that it happens in a fraction of a second. I cannot predict and don’t really know what I’ve done.” With the image instantly under review on a computer screen, there’s been a shift in the emphasis and perhaps romanticisim, irrespective of the tricks employed in digital post-production.

It’s is perhaps remarkable that diCorcia and Freedman were permitted to roam so widely and free for so long.

“I held them to ransom. This is the way it has to be or I’m not doing it,” the artist recalls of their initial understanding. “And Dennis knew that †what’s the point of doing something that just looks like somebody else?”

Philip-Lorca diCorcia: Eleven W Stories 1997-2008, edited by Dennis Freedman, is published by Freedman Damiani in April 2011

Original Post by independent.co.uk