Tag Archives: Iphone

Unfiltered: Photographers React to Instagram’s New Terms

It was a holiday surprise that few anticipated, and even fewer appreciated, as Instagram changed its terms/conditions of service on Monday, Dec. 17. Before the announcement, 2012 had been a landmark year for the photo-sharing service: in April, the service was purchased by Facebook for $1 billion, seeing a proliferation of users. Publications like TIME, National Geographic and the New Yorker have integrated Instagram in their editorial work — TIME has twice featured Instagram photographs on our cover this year — once for our Wireless Issue and another to lead our print coverage of Hurricane Sandy.

Instagram’s strength lies in the application’s no-fuss, integrated and intuitive interface — camera software tied to your phone (and now your Facebook account) that allow users to visually document everything from important world events to their breakfast. But as photographers adopted Instagram for creative and even professional purposes, questions arose about ownership, property rights and profitability.

According to the changes, effective January 16, 2013, any photograph posted on Instagram’s service can be repackaged and sold by Instagram for advertising purposes without the user’s knowledge or consent.  In addition, by agreeing to the new terms, users are responsible for any legal claims that may result from the promotion or use of their images.

Long story short: Instagram can use your content to increase their revenue, and if a legal claim is brought against the company regarding how these images have been used, you (the user) might be responsible for the damages.

Adam McCauley

UPDATE (Tues, 5:25pm EST): Instagram has posted a statement responding to user feedback.

LightBox will be updating this post throughout the day as more photographers weigh in. What do you think? Let us know in the comments below.

Photo News – Hotshoe magazine for contemporary photography Dec/Jan out now in print and as app

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Featuring: Leigh Ledare testing the boundaries of relationships, sex and love in Double Bind; Alinka Echeverria’s documentary on the birth of South Sudan; Diana Scherer‘s Nurture Studies; Asger Carlsen‘s Hester; and Fleur van Dodewaard in Crude Metaphors. Plus reviews of Alec Soth‘s Looking for Love, 1996, Klein + Moriyama at Tate Modern, and the Nikon D800. As well as, A.D. Coleman’s Letter from New York, a round up of the latest books, exhibition listings, news and more.

Subscribe for Print or your iPad/iPhone.

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EXCLUSIVE APP CONTENT:
Alan Spearman’s film of the streets of South Memphis ‘As I Am’, Viviane Sassen’s ode to her muse Roxane and a review of this year’s Paris Photo. Plus enriched portfolios, clickable exhibition listings and much, much more.

SPECIAL OFFER:
If you subscribe to Hotshoe International’s print edition during December, we’ll send you a free copy of our Oct-Nov issue as an early Christmas present.

Filed under: HotShoe magazine, iPad app, Photographers Tagged: Alec Soth, Alinka Echeverria, Asger Carlsen, Diana Scherer, Hotshoe App, Hotshoe App Edition, HotShoe magazine, Leigh Ledare

Portfolio Reviews – Photomonth at the Museum of Childhood with Citizen Skwith, Daniel Alexander and Dougie Wallace


Photos above © Citizen Skwith, Petting Zoo

The same day as the Tri-pod show PV took place at the Phoenix Brighton, I did a day of portfolio reviews at the Museum of Childhood in Bethnal Green for Photomonth. It’s the fourth year that I’ve done this and I’m always happy to be invited back.

I never know what to expect from the people I see and there are always some surprises, such as Citizen Skwith‘s clever signs and wonderful sense of humour (see photos above). Plus, reviewers get paid which is not always the case.

I’m posting a few iPhone photos from Photomonth’s recent portfolio reviews of some of the work that I came across, although I didn’t record all of it. If you were there and want to let people know about your work, post a comment with a link to your website/work.

So, in no particular order, here are a few projects that I saw. More from the reviews to come in another post later next week.

DANIEL ALEXANDER
Daniel Alexander says of 1day6cities project. “Today it is exactly a year on from  11.11.11 when the films were all shot. The project is also being exhibited at Oxford House until the end of this month.” This gives you all time to see it before it comes down.

1DAY6CITIES from 1day6cities on Vimeo.

“1DAY6CITIES is a global photography project that took place on the 11th November 2011 – 11.11.11, in London, Dubai, Shanghai, Auckland, San Francisco and São Paulo. Using word of mouth, email and social networks we put together an international team of photographers to create a unique twenty-four hour snapshot of this day across six very different cities around the globe. At exactly 00.00 Coordinated Universal Time (world time/GMT) photographers in each of these cities captured their first image in an event that saw photographs being taken every 30 seconds for the following 24 hours.

“The brief was for the photographers to shoot the most interesting thing happening in their city, at the time they had chosen to shoot. The cities were chosen because they are roughly an equal time difference apart meaning the films show the sun travelling around the earth through the course of the day.” The edited film is shown above and the edited stills can be seen on the 1day6cities website. There is a full list of the contributors on the website.

DOUGIE WALLACE
Dougie Wallace arrives wearing a pale blue/grey and black ensemble and carrying his colour coordinated portfolio. He smells of fish. Well, his breath does, on account of the fish pie he ate for lunch. He shows me his work, see Mumbai Rickshaw drivers shot and the Stags, Hens and Bunnies (working title) project, which is near to completion, and documents the day and night antics of hen nights and stag parties in the north.

There’s more than a hint of the Carry On about the subjects of some of these shots – all of which are well observed and captured with a wry sense of the absurd. Referring to himself as ‘The Martin Parr of the Facebook’ generation, take a look for yourself…

CITIZEN SKWITH
Citizen Skwith uses photography to document the signs that he makes and places in public places. Subverting and playing with the language of warning signs, Citizen Skwith’s works are a clever form of street art made available for everyone to enjoy. His website features all of his work and is well worth a look. I’ve already ordered the time traveller Blue Plaque for my hallway.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Festivals, street art, Visual Artists Tagged: 1day6cities, Citizen Skwith, Daniel Alexander, documentary photography, Dougie Wallace, Hens and Bunnies, london, Museum of Childhood, Petting Zoo, photomonth, portfolio reviews, Stags, stop motion, street art

Vintage Carnival Masks: iPhone portraits by Vee Speers

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Vintage Carnival Masks: iPhone portraits © by Vee Speers

These impromptu portraits feature ordinary and eccentric Parisians wearing vintage hand-painted Carnival masks. Fine-art photographer Vee Speers made this series just for fun — with her iPhone — over the course of a few dinner parties with friends.

The effect of the cartoon-like painted faces on 3D human bodies flattens and expands the images, playing tricks on the eye in a dizzying manner.

See more photos, and read more, in Lens Culture.

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Vintage Carnival Masks: iPhone portraits © by Vee Speers

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Vintage Carnival Masks: iPhone portraits © by Vee Speers

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Vintage Carnival Masks: iPhone portraits © by Vee Speers

Photo Stroll – Press preview Tom Wood Men & Women and Shoot! Existential Photography open at The Photographers’ Gallery London

Today, a whirlwind Photo Stroll tour through the press preview today of two photo shows, Tom Wood’s photo show Men & Women, and the shoot-themed collection of photos Shoot! Existential Photography. Both exhibitions open tomorrow at The Photographers’ Gallery in London and run until 6 January. So there’s plenty of time to take a stroll.

These shows combine a diverse range of visual genres and the tenderness of Wood’s beautifully articulated moments offsets the drama of the shoot imagery, such as Christian Marclay’s Crossfire and the various images of gun-toting women, including Fire at Will documenting Niki de Saint Phalle’s ‘shooting paintings’ created in the early 1960s. For those who fancy themselves as the fastest draw in the West (End), there’s even a shooting alley where, if you hit the bulls eye or the surrounding ring (see my attempt, last photo), the camera is triggered and Bingo, you get a photo of you shooting. For more on Men & Women, see earlier post on Tom Wood.
All iPhone photos © Miranda Gavin, 2012.

Click to view slideshow.

Click link to view the gallery images from the slide show…

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Filed under: Photo Stroll, Photographers, Photography Books, Photography Shows Tagged: Christian Marclay, Crossfire, Erik Kessels, Fire at Will, london, Men & Women, Niki de Saint Phalle, Shoot! Existential Photography, The Photographers’ Gallery, Tom Wood

Live From Mars: Interactive 360 Panorama from the Curiosity Rover

Image Courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech

A note to viewers: LightBox suggests viewing the panorama in full-screen mode. For visitors on a mobile device or tablet, we recommend utilizing our versions optimized for a fully immersive experience: 

iPAD version iPHONE version

Taking pictures on another world has never been just point and click. For decades, unmanned probes from Earth have been venturing to distant planets, moons and other bodies—and for just as many decades, the images they have sent home have been composed and transmitted in a decidedly painstaking way. That is especially so in the case of the 360-degree panorama NASA is now releasing of the Curiosity rover’s landing site in Mars’s Gale Crater.

Even on Earth, you have to be selective when you photograph a landscape. After all, no matter how glorious your picture of one part of the Grand Canyon is, it by definition leaves out countless other, equally glorious parts. The only way to capture the whole sweep of the place is to take many small images and bit by bit, piece them all together. That’s hard enough when the camera is in your hand. Now imagine doing it when all of your hardware is 154 million miles away and the data has to be streamed back you in a comparative trickle that, even moving at light speed, takes 17 minutes to get here.

(See more: Inside Look at the Mars Curiosity Rover)

But NASA did just that to produce its full pirouette picture of the Marscape that surrounds Curiosity. The panorama was built from 30 smaller images shot by the rover’s Navcams—or navigation cameras—on Aug. 18 and Aug. 7. Each picture has a resolution of 1,024 pixels by 1,024 pixels, and all of them have been combined in such a way that the seams connecting them disappear. The lighter colored strip at the top right of the image is the rim of Gale Crater—chosen as the landing site because it was once a deep sea. Also visible is the peak of nearby Mount Sharp, which rises 3.4 mi. (5.5 km) into the rust-red sky. The portions of the picture in the Martian sky that appear gray are parts of the mosaic that have not yet been added, but will be the next time NASA updates the image.

As their name implies, the Navcams are used mostly for reconnaissance purposes—scouting out where the rover will drive and mapping the best route to get there. They were thus not designed with beauty in mind—and that means they shoot only in black and white. The cameras mounted atop Curiosity’s mast capture the full range of desert-like colors that define the brutally beautiful Gale Crater environment. The entire suite of on-board cameras will have a lot of work to do in the two years ahead—and every picture they take will be one worth saving. Once the rover starts rolling, after all, it will never be staying in any one place for long.

(Related: Window on Infinity: Pictures from Space)

An iPhone in the DRC: Photos by Michael Christopher Brown

Like many photojournalists,Ive beenshooting with myiPhone for a while.Using a mobile phone allowsme to be somewhat invisible asa professional photographer;people see me as just anotherperson in the crowd.Invisibility is particularly usefulin the eastern part of the DemocraticRepublic of Congo, wherea potpourri of armed groups andgovernments have used conflictminerals as the latest way to helpfund the warfare, atrocities andrepression that have afflicted thearea for more than a century.

The electronics industry isone of the main destinations forthese minerals, which include tourmaline,cassiterite and coltan.They are used to make criticalcomponents of mobile phones,laptops and other gadgets. So it isfittingif ironicthat I shot thisentire essay with my iPhone.I arrived in Congo in earlyAugust to document some of themines in an attempt to highlighthow the minerals travel out of thecountryand the trades effecton the lives of the workers whohandle them along the way. At acamp for internally displacedpeople in Kibati, the phonehelped me shoot scenes unobtrusively.Taking photographswith a phone also raises myawareness as a photographer. Insteadof concentrating on camerasettings and a large piece ofequipment, I am better able tofocus on the situation beforeme. It becomes more about howI feel and what I see.

In Congo, the effects of themineral trade on every personslifeeven the lives ofpeople who arent working atthe minesare palpable. At aHeal Africa clinic in Goma, Imet an emaciated teenage girlwho had been gang-raped bythree Hutu militiamen allegedly funded by profits fromthe mines.Im not advocating givingup our gadgets. The causes ofproblems in Congo are far morecomplex. There are industry sponsored programslike Solutions for Hope, whichtries to monitor coltan. Butauditing the origins of theseminerals is complicated by inaccessibilityand danger. Id likepeople to pause when they lookat these photographs, takingtime to think about where thematerial for modern technology comes fromand what lives are affected before they get into thephones in our hands.

Michael Christopher Brown is a photographer based in New York City. Directory Submission . His photographs appear in this week’s issue of TIME. See more of his work here.

Things to Submit to!

The next LENSCRATCH exhibition is on your HOME TOWN.  Please send one image of your home town (72dpi, 1000px on the long side, in jpg format) and include:


Name, title, location, link  (Aline Smithson, Lego Hollywood, Los Angeles, CA, http://www.alinesmithson.com)


Send to: [email protected]

Aline Smithson, Lego Hollywood, Los Angeles, CA
I have the great pleasure of juroring two upcoming calls…

Announcing Love + Lust

Lust is an intense appetite, craving, or untamed desire. We lust for an array of things—money, power, objects, sex, or just living life. Love is a powerful
affection or personal attachment and comes in a variety of forms, which
can encompass romantic, sexual, platonic, narcissistic, or 
even religious feelings or attitudes. And sometimes love and lust overlap. Show us your interpretations. Who or what do you love or lust for? 
What images capture these emotions for you?


Portraits,
fashion, editorial, landscape, documentary, conceptual, or any other
genre is open for consideration. Color, b&w, iPhone, or 
alternative processes are all eligible.




Book Title: Open to interpretation

Theme: Love + Lust
Judge: Aline Smithson, LENSCRATCH
Submission Fee: $40 for 5 images, $10 additional

Deadline for submission: January 10, 2013
Results Announced: January 23, 2013
Results Posted Online: February 6, 2013
Awards: $1,000 Cover Image + $500 Judge’s Selection Award

2012 FotoWeek DC International Awards Competition

Challenge the Way We Look at the World
FotoWeekDC’s 5th Annual International Awards Competition is looking for extraordinary images – we’re looking for yours! The 2012 competition will honor professional and emerging photographers from our region and from around the world.

  • Cash prizes totaling $20,000
  • Winning images will be exhibited and/or projected during FotoWeekDC, November 9-18 as well as online.
  • Winners will be selected by a distinguished panel of world-renowned judges
  • Winners will be notified on or about October 5, 2012.

Back by popular demand—People’s Choice Award! 
Your entries will be judged by a distinguished panel of industry experts, who will select the top 3 winners in each category. Now, by voting in the People’s Choice category, your friends and fans will have a say too. The top 20 images with the most number of votes across all of the categories will win extra recognition, and will be seen by an even broader audience.
The People’s Choice Award Prizes:
One free FotoPage Annual Subscription for each winning photographer and online exposure through a top 20 feature on FotoDC.org’s People’s Choice Gallery.