Tag Archives: International Photo

Guest Blogger 3 – Join Hotshoe Blog’s conversation On the Move: Mobile Photography at World Photo Organisation

TheGreatEscapeJanineGraf

The Great Escape © Janine Graf

Ansel Adams said it best: “There is nothing worse than a sharp image of a fuzzy concept”. Janine Graf from interview

EXCERPT FROM WPO BLOG:

Welcome back to my fourth post leading up until Christmas. Today I turn to the world of mobile photography with the help of Joanne Carter from The App Whisperer to find out more. What’s clear is that mobile photography is here to stay; it’s fun, there’s a growing community of like-minded people getting involved and it allows people to shoot and edit on the go, giving them greater freedom than using a DSLR.

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(L-R) Joanne Carter and Miranda Gavin Hotshoe Blog at the mObilepixatiOn show. Image by Dilshad Corleone (Columnist for theappwhisperer.com)

Before this, there are two things to mention. The Sony World Photography Awards, which is judged in late January, is viewed on screen and it makes no difference what type of equipment is used to produce submitted photographs. However, the competition asks photographers to note the cameras used in their submissions. One of 2011’s finalists, Balazs Gardi followed Afghani troops and edited his work with hipstamatic. I’m trying to get stats as to how many submissions are produced on mobile devices as I would like to monitor this in relation to international photo competitions. Also, I have a suggestion for the Sony World Photography Awards. What about adding a Mobile Photography category to next year’s awards?

Secondly, as it’s the lead up to Christmas, here at Hotshoe magazine we’re offering one person a year’s subscription to the magazine, plus a free copy of the Oct/Nov 2012 edition of the magazine sent to your home. All you have to do is go to the Hotshoe International Facebook page and LIKE the magazine by the end of the week. That’s it. The team at Hotshoe will select a winner at random from those ‘liking’ the page this week and I will announce the lucky winner next week on this blog. Happy Christmas.

To read interviews with some of the key players in the world pof mobile photography and photo art click on this link On the Move – Mobile Photography, to the rest of the post. You won’t be disappointed, there are some very interesting points made by the interviewees.

Filed under: Mobile Photo Art, Mobile Photography, Photographers, Portraiture, street photography, Visual Artists, Women Photographers Tagged: Janine Graf, Joanne Carter, Miranda Gavin, Mobile photo art, Mobile Photography, mobilepixation, The App Whisperer

Europe Week: Salva Lopez

Guest editor, Jacqueline Roberts shares a week of European photographers, starting with Salva Lopez. A huge thank you toJacqueline for her insight and efforts. Her statement for why she selected the photographers follows: 


 I chose these photographs because they move me. They are portraits of people, young or old. They tell a story, maybe theirs, maybe ours. Some speak softly, hushing over us like in Lopez’ muted portraits of old people. Others exude exuberance and vitality, like in Laboile’s family life. Some are languid portraits, others raw pictures of a sore existence. Some stare right back at us, like in Videnin’s photographs; others gently lower their gaze. Yet for me, they all share that essential quality that turns a good photograph into a great one: immediacy. We know a good photograph when we see one. When I look at these images, I relate to them immediately, to the people they portray, to the narrative. They have their own language, a language that speak to me, a language that I understand. There is an intuitive connection that synchronises our own experience with a photograph. A reciprocal flow. An empathic exchange. 


I was at Getxophoto this summer, an international photo festival near Bilbao (Spain), and it struck me when two passers-by paused in front of a photograph and remarked: “Oh that’s very nice, but what does that mean? What was the artist trying to tell us?” searching for answers. Images carry meaning, they do; but in my case, it is the quest for questions that I relish when looking at a photograph. To me, these photographs tell us about loneliness, joy and pain; about dreams, beauty and hopelessness; about search and loss… Vehicles for meanings, emotions and thoughts. Stories of bodies and souls… ultimately, metaphors of life and what lies underneath.–Jacqueline Roberts


image by Salva Lopez


Salva López (Barcelona, 1984) trained as a graphic designer but when he discovered photographers Stephen Shore, Joel Sternfeld and Alec Soth, he realised that photography was what he wanted to do. Since then Salva has gained recognition in Spain as an emerging talent, winning many awards (e.g.Fotoactitud, Photoespaña) and showing his work in exhibitions and photo festivals.

Salva is currently working on his project “The Green Curtain”, about the mount Montjuïc in Barcelona. He is also co-editor of the blog “Have a Nice Book” about photography books that he edits with his friend and also photographer Yosigo.

Roig 26 is a project that I have carried
out bit by bit through observation, reflection and from my experience of living
with my grand parents, Marina y José, for five years in their modest apartment
on Roig street, in the Barcelona “Raval” district. An apartment that
has been the stage of their relationship for more than 60 years. A whole life
inside these same walls and these same fears.

With Roig 26 my intention was not to draw a true portrait of their own reality, but rather to recreate one, through what I have experienced with them.


What does your cultural heritage bring to your work?

It is difficult to know which type of cultural heritage has influence my work. Obviously I have my own cultural references, my region, my surroundings, Catalonia, Spain, the Mediterranean and Europe. But in a global world, my influences come also from the United States, through their movies, their music, their literature and particularly through their photography. William Eggleston or Stephen Shore have had an impact on me from the start. 

What difference do see between work created in Europe and in the States?

Ummm… I would say that in the United States a formal approach often predominates along with a more intuitive and visual narrative. I believe that in Europe we perhaps make it more intellectual, we try to find a concept for each photographic work. The ideal work, for me, would that which is visually strong and has an intellectual dimension, that is interesting but not necessarily explicit. In my work, there are days when I wake up as a European and others as an American. Here in Europe we too often “split hairs”.

What is the state of photography in your country (how is photography perceived in the art scene, is there support, are galleries selling, etc.)?
As everybody knows, Spain is going through a massive crisis and the first budget cuts have affected cultural activities. Most grants are gone now, and what is left will not last long. I am not too familiar with galleries so I can’t really say, but one thing is sure, sales have fallen dramatically.
Having said that, I think that Spanish photographers are getting better and we are gradually reaching European levels. People are very motivated and there are more and more groups that support young talented photographers. I know quite well the world of photography books and I can see the progression. Publishing houses are publishing very interesting things and photography books are now making the Top 10 list for best books. Last year for instance, Ricardo Cases with ‘Paloma al aire’ and Julian Barón with ‘CENSURA’ were among the top 10. And it is very likely that Cristina de Middel’s book ‘Afronautas’, will make it this year. 
There is still loads more to do, support and funds are scarce, but luckily and thanks to the Internet it is now much easier to access information and promote your work. The intermediaries who were once indispensable are less so today.

Leo De Bock

“My focus has always been on people: how they survive, how they suffer or fight injustice, how they love, how they care, how they live, how they pursue their ambitions, how they die. I am particularly fascinated by the consequences of population ageing.” -Leo De Bock


Images from Growing Old in Roumania

I think it’s important that we look at ourselves, warts and all, through all aspects of our lives. It’s what keeps us real and allows us to celebrate every part of our aging process. Belgium photographer, Leo De Bock has been engaged in the human condition for a long time. Currently associated with the international photo agency www.reporters.be, Leo started his career as a tv-reporter.

In the 1990’s, Leo became known for his work as a documentary film maker. He was the first and only to do an in-depth documentary about the consequences brought about by the building of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Middle China. Eight years after the disaster in Tchernobyl (Ukrain), he reported about the many young families still awaiting evacuation in the 30 kilometer danger zone. His documentaries won several international awards.

I am featuring work from two series, Growing Old in Roumania and Worlds of Forgetfulness, both insightful looks into what comes at the end of life.

Population ageing is
unprecedented, without parallel in the history of humanity. Increases in the
proportions of older persons (60 years or older) are being accompanied by
declines in the proportions of the young (under age 15). By 2050, the number of
older persons in the world will exceed the number of young for the first time
in history. Moreover, by 1998 this historic reversal in relative proportions of
young and old had already taken place in the more developed regions. 

Population ageing is pervasive, a global phenomenon affecting every man, woman and child. The steady increase of older age groups in national populations, both in absolute numbers and in relation to the working-age population, has a direct bearing on the intergenerational and intragenerational equity and solidarity that are the foundations of society. Population ageing is also enduring. During the twentieth century the proportion of older persons continued to rise, and this trend is expected to continue into the twenty-first century. The proportion of older persons is projected to reach 21 per cent in 2050 (scource: UN-report ‘World Population Ageing 1950-2050).

“Working for the Flemish Public Health Department, I got particularly interested in the increasing number of people suffering from dementia. Society as it is now, is not prepared for this tsunami. Dealing with dementia requires a serious reorganization of the social and medical system and in particular, an urgent need to revalue home care. I noticed many people are ignorant about what dementia really implies. I try to tell them. My photos try to tell them.”

“Population ageing has a specific meaning in former communist countries like the largely forgotten Roumania. In a communist state citizenswere relevant to progress in that they worked and helped produce. Hence, people who were no longer active, like the elder, were of little importance.  With the number of old people only growing, the issues becomes more acute. A catch-up is urgently needing. Yet, this exactly what does not happen. I visited old people on the countryside, living isolated, depending solely on home care workers to help them survive. They are poor, sometimes lonely, sad, but they do not give up their pride.” 

Images from Worlds of Forgetfullness

International Photo Portfolio Reviews: Paris, Nov 12-14, 2012

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3 days of international photography portfolio reviews in Paris, hosted at Spéos,
with support from Paris Photo, FotoFest International (Houston), Lens Culture, and
Amis de la Photographie Internationale.

Register today for the largest and most effective photography portfolio reviews in Europe: Lens Culture FotoFest Paris 2012. November 12-13-14, 2012.

“Lens Culture portfolio reviews are among the best —
because they get results!”

Photographers from 27 countries have registered already for this truly international photography event (many are returning for the 2nd or 3rd time):

• Belgium
• Brazil
• Canada
• Colombia
• Croatia
• Denmark
• Ethiopia
• France
• Germany
• Iceland
• Ireland
• Israel
• Italy
• Japan
• Latvia
• Netherlands
• Norway
• Poland
• Russia
• South Africa
• South Korea
• Spain
• Sweden
• Taiwan
• United States
• United Kingdom
• Wales •

Register today. Registrations are filling fast. Deadline to be included in the catalog is September 21, 2012.

Please tell all of your friends and colleagues who are serious about careers in photography. See fotofest-paris.com for full details.

Jason Reblando, Looking Over Fence

Jason Reblando, Looking Over Fence

Jason Reblando

Looking Over Fence,
Chicago, 2008
From the Lathrop Homes series
Website – JasonReblando.com

Jason Reblando is a photographer and artist based in Chicago. He received his MFA in Photography from Columbia College Chicago and a BA in Sociology from Boston College. His photographs have been published in the New York Times, Bloomberg Businessweek, Camera Austria, Nueva Luz, Bauwelt, and PDNedu. His work has been exhibited in the Singapore International Photo Festival, the Photographic Resource Center at Boston University, the Houston Center for Photography, the Light Factory in Charlotte, the Hyde Park Art Center in Chicago, and the Minnesota Center for Photography. His work is collected in the Museum of Contemporary Photography's Midwest Photographers Project, the Milwaukee Art Museum, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Analog Interactivity and the Photography of Anouk Kruithof

While most photographers aim to depict the world in a fresh way through the lens of their cameras, Dutch artist Anouk Kruithof aims to revolutionize the way we actually experience looking at photographs. She delights viewers by making unexpected photo, video and spatial installations as well as social, in-situation works or “take-away art.” Last year she won the Jury Prize at the Hyères International Photo festival in France and, as part of that prize, produced an exhibition at this year’s festival—one that literally takes the unexpectedness of her installations to a new height.

The proliferation of digital photography has led to a glut of images in the world, and Kruithof’s holistic approach to making photographic artwork feels fresh within a new generation of artists who question that surplus. Like many young people, she is a compulsive photographer and calls her habit “automagic.” She saw the exhibition at Hyères as an opportunity to do something with ten years worth of images languishing on her hard drives, and that led to the search for an editor who would see the images in a new way.

For the project, called “Untitled: I’ve Taken too Many Photos/I’ve Never Taken a Photo,” she set out to find someone to help her edit her work—someone who had never taken a photograph in his or her life. She began by posting signs in her Bedford Stuyvesant neighborhood in Brooklyn, New York, that read, “Did you Never Made a Photo in Your Life.” Even with the grammatical error, she decided to put them up. The responses led her to a young man named Harrison, who was 19 years old and the only one of the 15 respondents who had never taken a photograph.

“I saw him at his house and asked a lot,” she says. “So I am sure he never took a photo before, which was super special. He is a bit of a ‘pearl’. Also his name is excellent: ‘Harrison Medina.’”

The editing process began with 300 images, which Medina narrowed down to 80 and sized. Kruithof recorded the process as part of the work. “He was just reacting naturally, very much from the heart—just reflecting on them in a very pure and personal way,” she says. Medina looked for two types of images: “He saw either things which reminded him of the ‘bad’ situation in society—a situation he is also in—and, on the other hand, he just used his imagination to see things in the photos.”

       

At the exhibition, the images are all installed on the ceiling and viewers are given hand-held mirrors to view them. “The space, which is an old medieval tower, made me think I wanted to respect it because of the beauty of the building and the atmosphere inside of the building. You cannot hang photos on these walls; it wouldn’t make any sense to me,” Kruithof explains. “When you enter this serene space the first natural thing to do is to look up.” She also believes that the installation format allows viewers to see all 75 photos together or to “frame” their own pictures, rather than looking at one at a time. The framing of the image, in a way that is literally in the hands of the visitor, encourages active participation in the exhibit. Those who see the exhibit become editors, like Harrison was. Kruithof calls the process “analog interactivity.”

The dynamic nature of the installation is something the artist sees throughout her work. “It is like a never-ending chain; one project, book, series or single work ties onto the other one with a certain flow,” she says. “With every new thing I do I want to be surprised  and make something I didn’t see before. Otherwise it would not make sense for me.” And in this case the surprise was a happy one: ”It gave me a good feeling seeing all these people busy framing their pictures and looking at the mirrors of others. It had a lot of depth, in content as well as in form,” she says. ”I am not often happy when a show is up, but in this case I really was.”

Anouk Kruithof is a Dutch photographer. Her most recent book is A Head With Wings, made in collaboration with Alec Soth and Little Brown Mushroom. She was recently awarded the Infinity Award for art by the International Center for Photography. “Untitled (I’ve Taken too Many Photos/ I’ve Never Taken a Photo)” is on view at Hyères 2012 at the Tour des Templiers, historic center through May 26 and she hopes it will come to the States this year. More of her work and books can be seen here.

Video: 34 Award-winning photographers & multimedia makers

A 22-minute presentation of the winners of the Lens Culture International Exposure Awards 2011 — some of the best in global photography and multimedia today.

The nine top winners and 25 honorable mention winners represent work from 14 countries – submitted by artists from 48 countries.

In 2011, the international jury of experts awarded prizes in three categories:

Photography Portfolio
Single Image
Multimedia

The winning entries cover a broad and diverse range of subject matter, stylistic approaches, and technical processes. Enjoy!

These award winners are currently being screened at film festivals and international arts venues around the world, including the SPE National Conference Film Festival in San Francisco; the Houston Center for Photography during FotoFest 2012; The Bilder Nordic series in Olso, Norway; the Voies Off Festival in Arles, France; the international photo festival in Tuscany, Italy: Cortona On The Move — and venues in Paris, London, New York, Brisbane and others to be announced.

Enter YOUR photographs and multimedia for the Lens Culture International Exposure Awards Awards 2012:
lensculture.com/awards. The competition is now open for new submissions!

Latitidue 34 South

I was sad when my good friend, Martin Herrera Soler, moved to Uruguay, but I was excited to learn that he has helped create Latitude 34 South. Latitude 34 South is “a world-class endeavor specialized in travel workshops in the South of South America. We don’t city-tour: we create truly cultural experiences. Because we are local, we know the culture and its people, and, our international travel and business experience gives us a global ‘touch’. We will only take you to places we really know, and in general, these are little known and lost in time places, with a rich story behind them.

Additionally, we follow a unique approach to tutoring: by working with an overarching theme for the workshop and offering multi-level tutoring we enable every participant to improve his|her skills and leave the workshop with a finished product, usually a digital story or a photographic book.”

Who are we?

We are a team of multi-discipline visual artists professionals eager to share our region and connect with the international photographic community. We do this because we love what is here to photograph and we want to share it with you. We do this in a sustainable and responsible way. We take care of the environment, we are responsible with the people and the communities in which we photograph, and we always look for ways to give back (financially and otherwise) to make sure we can preserve this wonderful place where we live in.

This endeavor is a collaborative effort of Martin Herrera Soler, Diego Vidart and Clara Hori. Since one of our goals is to engage the international photo community, we love to bring aboard guest instructors from all places and walks of life.

Candombe from Latitude34South on Vimeo.