Tag Archives: International Exhibitions

Shane Lavalette, Will with Banjo

Shane Lavalette, Will with Banjo

Shane Lavalette

Will with Banjo,
, 2011
From the Picturing the South series
Website – ShaneLavalette.com

Shane Lavalette is a photographer, the founding Publisher and Editor of Lay Flat as well as the Associate Director of Light Work. Lavalette grew up in Vermont and is currently based in Upstate New York. He holds a BFA from Tufts University in partnership with The School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Lavalette’s photographs have been shown widely, including national and international exhibitions. A new body of work by Lavalette will be on view at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, GA from June 9 – September 2, 2012. Lavalette has launched a Kickstarter campaign to support the funding of a photobook of this new work.

Eric Tabuchi: FAT ( A French American Trip)

Eric Tabuchi has just released a new book, FAT, A French American Road Trip, published by Matmos Press in Montreal. It’s a wonderful collection of images that bring humor to the idea of our globalized world, where the homoginization of cultural landmarks make no sense in their new contexts. But the most amazing element of this series, is that these images are all Google screen captures.

Eric is a modern day typologist, with an amazing range of projects. His website is an incredible reflection of the potential of looking at our world. Eric works and lives in Paris and has a long roster of international exhibitions. Eric states:
“Photography is first and foremost a technique for recording images. That is PRECISELY The Reason Why it is so captivating – literally, it Consists in Capturing stuff. Purpose, to answer your question, I think photography is Above All That projection was of the past into the future, an anticipation of what has-been and Will no longer exist. That is why I wait for Several years Often Before publishing my gold Exhibiting photographs.”

Images from Alphabet Truck

Images from Eldorado

Images from French Countryside Skateparks

FAT – A French American Trip: Pursuing his pop and serial studies of the French landscape, Eric Tabuchi questions the validity of his photographic method in contrast to the considerable power wielded by the likes of Google, which, via his global digitization company, is at last carrying out a project that is genuinely objective. Thus, contrary to his habitual method of scanning the field, Eric Tabuchi has undertaken the exploration of familiar places, but through this parallel world, the carbon copy of reality that is Street View.Consequently, FAT creates a strain between these two levels of perception, which are henceforth known to all as the virtual and the real, the space of projection and the concrete territory.

FAT is America, projected through the realm of the French imagination, digitized by Google and at last, compiled by Eric Tabuchi, as a sort of staggeringly condensed outlook of what globalization could be, in the era of internet. In this respect, FAT is a doubly motionless voyage as it entails visiting America through its emblematic landmarks without leaving France, and what’s more, in front of a computer screen. Residing in Paris during the summer of 2011, Eric Tabuchi, after envisioning this voyage into reality, set out on this virtual “road trip”, making an inventory of businesses – bars for the most part – bearing the name of a city, place or state visible on Street View. In 32 screen captures, two geographies are layered, which, from New York to El Paso, from Villeurbanne to Draguignan, testifies to the gap that divides the “elsewhere” from “here”.

Irina Rozovsky, Untitled

Irina Rozovsky, Untitled

Irina Rozovsky

Untitled,
Prospect Park, Brooklyn, New York, 2011
From the In Plain Air series
Website – IrinaR.com

Irina Rozovsky (b.1981, Moscow) studied French and Spanish literature as an undergraduate at Tufts University and received an MFA in photography from Massachusetts College of Art. Her work has been featured in numerous national and international exhibitions and publications, including 25 under 25: Up and Coming American Photographers; 31 Women in Art Photography; Exposure at the PRC, the Magnum Expression Award, Photo España, and others. Her first monograph One to Nothing was published by Kehrer Verlag, and named on the "Best Books of 2011" lists by Alec soth and photo-eye Magazine. Irina lives in Brooklyn, NY and teaches at the International Center of Photography and the Art Institute of Boston.

Penelope Umbrico & Cay Sophie Rabinowitz In Conversation

Suns from Flickr © Penelope Umbrico

Aperture Foundation and Dear Dave, Magazine present a conversation with artist Penelope Umbrico and Cay Sophie Rabinowitz, cofounder and Editor of Fantom magazine. This event coincides with the recently released Aperture book Penelope Umbrico (photographs), which offers a radical reinterpretation of everyday consumer and vernacular images.

Penleope Umbrico (born in Philadelphia, 1957) graduated from the Ontario College of Art and Design in Toronto, and received her MFA from the School of Visual Arts, New York. She has participated extensively in solo and group exhibitions, including at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and PS1 Contemporary Art Center, New York. Umbrico is core faculty at the School of Visual Arts MFA Photography, Video, and Related Media Program. She lives in New York City.

Cay Sophie Rabinowitz is a contemporary art writer, curator, and educator, based mostly in New York and sometimes in Berlin. She became well-known and respected as the Senior Editor of Parkett and Artistic Director of Art Basel. After almost a decade of service to Parsons The New School for Design’s graduate program of photography, she recently moved on to teach in the MFA program at Columbia University. Among the many international exhibitions and programs of contemporary art, she co-curated the 2nd Athen’s Biennale and a number of projects for Art Production Fund Lab in New York. She is cofounder and Editor of Fantom, a quarterly of photography, and In 2011 Ms. Rabinowitz launched together with designer Sofia Sizzi the brand Giulietta, applying her extensive background in art to a fashion context.

Tuesday, October 4, 7:00 pm

This event is FREE and open to the public.

SVA Theater
333 West 23rd Street
New York, New York
(212) 592-2000

Buy the book Penelope Umbrico (photographs) for 30% off

Click here to read Penelope Umbrico on Artfoum’s 500 Words

Irina Rozovsky





All images ©Irina Rozovsky

While looking through our submissions inbox we found this delicate and understated project by Irina Rozovsky. One to Nothing is a gentle body of work about Israel that abandons any preconceptions or prejudices we may hold towards this typically “troubled” place or depiction thereof.

“One to Nothing depicts an Israel we do not see on the news. These images go beyond politics: they do not defend a side or critique the conflict. Here, Israel is seen in an unexpected light, as a mythological backdrop to the age long struggle between man and the dusty, sun bleached landscape of his origin. The score to this existential battle is locked at 1– 0, with no finish line in sight. A loose, subtle, and open-ended narrative One to Nothing describes historic tension with striking and unusual observations.”

Irina Rozovsky, was born in Moscow in 1981 and grew up outside of Boston. She received a BA in French and Spanish Literature from Tufts University and an MFA in Photography from Massachusetts College of Art. 

She was a recipient of the Magnum Expression Finalist Award, juried by Martin Parr in 2010 and her work has been shown in national and international exhibitions. Among these are; 31 Women in Art Photography, curated by Charlotte Cotton and Jon Feinstein, Photo España, Madrid, Les Rencontres d’Arles, and, most recently, she was the subject of a solo exhibition at the New England School of Photography, Boston.

Rozovsky currently lives in Brooklyn, New York and One to Nothing is her first monograph, recently published by Kehrer Verlag.

Irina Rozovsky





All images ©Irina Rozovsky

While looking through our submissions inbox we found this delicate and understated project by Irina Rozovsky. One to Nothing is a gentle body of work about Israel that abandons any preconceptions or prejudices we may hold towards this typically “troubled” place or depiction thereof.

“One to Nothing depicts an Israel we do not see on the news. These images go beyond politics: they do not defend a side or critique the conflict. Here, Israel is seen in an unexpected light, as a mythological backdrop to the age long struggle between man and the dusty, sun bleached landscape of his origin. The score to this existential battle is locked at 1– 0, with no finish line in sight. A loose, subtle, and open-ended narrative One to Nothing describes historic tension with striking and unusual observations.”

Irina Rozovsky, was born in Moscow in 1981 and grew up outside of Boston. She received a BA in French and Spanish Literature from Tufts University and an MFA in Photography from Massachusetts College of Art. 

She was a recipient of the Magnum Expression Finalist Award, juried by Martin Parr in 2010 and her work has been shown in national and international exhibitions. Among these are; 31 Women in Art Photography, curated by Charlotte Cotton and Jon Feinstein, Photo España, Madrid, Les Rencontres d’Arles, and, most recently, she was the subject of a solo exhibition at the New England School of Photography, Boston.

Rozovsky currently lives in Brooklyn, New York and One to Nothing is her first monograph, recently published by Kehrer Verlag.

Natasha Egan to become New Director of the MoCP

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The Museum of Contemporary Photography is pleased to announce Natasha Egan as its new Director beginning September 1, 2011.

Egan has been at the MoCP for 15 years and has organized numerous national and international exhibitions, such as Made in China; The Edge of Intent; The Road to Nowhere? for the Fotofest 2010 Biennial; and, most recently, Public Works at the MoCP.

Egan has contributed essays to such publications as Shimon Attie: The History of Another; Beate Gütschow: LS/S; Michael Wolf: The Transparent City and Placing Memory: A Photographic Exploration of Japanese American Internment. Additionally, she frequently juries national and international exhibitions and lectures.

Current Director Rod Slemmons, who is leaving the MoCP to become a Curator-at-Large and Director of Special Projects in Columbia College Chicago’s Office of Academic Research, leaves behind a strong legacy at the MoCP.

“I’m quite proud of all that we’ve been able to accomplish over my past nine years at the MoCP,” says Mr. Slemmons. “When I arrived, the permanent collection began at 1957 and was purely American. We quickly changed that to 1936, allowing us to include major holdings by photographers working during the Great Depression–– plus, we diversified the collection by including more international work.”

“The institution has seen significant progress under Rod Slemmons’ direction,” said Egan, “and I’m thrilled to build upon his efforts.”

For more information on changes at the museum, upcoming shows and exhibitions, or details on the artists that comprise its permanent collection, please take a look at the MoCP’s website, keep updated here on our newly renovated blog or become a fan on Facebook.

Natasha Egan to become New Director of the MoCP

php3sK2CJPM.jpg

The Museum of Contemporary Photography is pleased to announce Natasha Egan as its new Director beginning September 1, 2011.

Egan has been at the MoCP for 15 years and has organized numerous national and international exhibitions, such as Made in China; The Edge of Intent; The Road to Nowhere? for the Fotofest 2010 Biennial; and, most recently, Public Works at the MoCP.

Egan has contributed essays to such publications as Shimon Attie: The History of Another; Beate Gütschow: LS/S; Michael Wolf: The Transparent City and Placing Memory: A Photographic Exploration of Japanese American Internment. Additionally, she frequently juries national and international exhibitions and lectures.

Current Director Rod Slemmons, who is leaving the MoCP to become a Curator-at-Large and Director of Special Projects in Columbia College Chicago’s Office of Academic Research, leaves behind a strong legacy at the MoCP.

“I’m quite proud of all that we’ve been able to accomplish over my past nine years at the MoCP,” says Mr. Slemmons. “When I arrived, the permanent collection began at 1957 and was purely American. We quickly changed that to 1936, allowing us to include major holdings by photographers working during the Great Depression–– plus, we diversified the collection by including more international work.”

“The institution has seen significant progress under Rod Slemmons’ direction,” said Egan, “and I’m thrilled to build upon his efforts.”

For more information on changes at the museum, upcoming shows and exhibitions, or details on the artists that comprise its permanent collection, please take a look at the MoCP’s website, keep updated here on our newly renovated blog or become a fan on Facebook.