Tag Archives: International Awards

David Ellingsen

I have been a fan of David Ellingsen’s work since I picked up a postcard of his images at Photolucida some years back.  He has a new project, Obsolete Delete that  takes a look, in a very creative way, at technological obsolescence.  I am also featuring his project Skylife that follows the visual tread of his wider environmental work, “contributing to awareness and helping fuel the great call to action that, at this late hour, is imperative we clearly hear.” But he is also opening an exhibition, Sea/Life at the Djavid Mowafaghian Atrium, Beaty Biodiversity Museum in Vancouver that will run through February 3rd.

David was raised on Cortes Island, a remote community of 1000 residents in Canada’s Pacific Northwest, on a small family farm surrounded by forest and ocean. As an adult, David became a well-regarded commercial photographer gleaning advertising and editorial assignments from The New York Times Magazine, People, and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, among many others. But David also has been able to create a parallel photo life, with a fine art resume reflecting dozens of exhibitions worldwide with numerous international awards and honors. It is his fine art work that brings him back to his childhood roots, to a focus that is steeped in the natural world.

Obsolete Delete 

This series looks at the ever increasing speed of technological obsolescence, the environment, and the collision of the two. When it comes to the state of the environment, our society’s cognitive dissonance, and more importantly the manifestations of this discomfort, has become a recurring motivator for my work and is certainly crucial to the meaning of this body of photographs. The distinct yet wildly divergent modern ideals that we are bombarded with – to consume and yet to conserve – provide a clear path to a source of our discomfort and again illuminate the seemingly willful ignorance of the urgency of the declining biosphere.

 SkyLife 
As the second part in a series, SkyLife continues the narrative from the SeaLife collection, investigating and documenting the organisms within the declining ecosystems of the planet. SkyLife focuses on creatures of the air – birds and winged insects – their beginnings, endings and the physical forms between the two. Like its predecessor, SkyLife is intended to be a part of the wider environmental discussion, contributing to awareness and helping fuel the great call to action that, at this late hour, is imperative we clearly hear. 

Jacqueline Roberts

It is with great pleasure and excitement that I introduce Jacqueline Roberts as next week’s guest curator and writer.  She will be sharing the work of six contemporary European photographers over the course of the week, exposing us to image makers an ocean away. Today I will be celebrating her wonderful work that beautifully explores children and childhood.

Jacqueline is a Spanish photographer born in Paris and now lives and works in Wincheringen, Germany, with her husband Gareth and their children Madoc, Malen and Emrys–making her a perfect European ambassador of photography. Her work has been shown in France, Spain, Germany and Luxembourg and has won various international awards, including the International Photography Awards in New York and the Prix de la Photographie in Paris. Jacqueline works with different photographic mediums, both digital and analogue, as well as with photographic techniques from the 19th century. She has published two books with editor Galerie Vevais, within the collector’s series Werkdruck and she is currently preparing her third monograph Kindred Spirits, which will be published next year.
 Kindred Spirits is a celebration of childhood and by extension life, tinged with nostalgia; a constructed memory for the future… a family album, simply. At a time in my life where my children are growing up and my parents are ageing… a reminder of the trace of time and fleeting nature of life.
 images from Kindred Spirits

Triptychs is primarily a tribute to my children, all born on the same day, which consists of three triple triptychs. With this series of portraits I wanted to emphasise the connection between them, the fraternal bond, the communion almost, that exists between them. Three distinct individuals yet connected. It was relevant therefore to present the work as triptychs, for the religious connotations it confers to the images but also to embrace the symbolism of the number three in a wider cultural realm. Three represents the triad of family: male, female, and child; the triad of the cycle of life: birth, life, and death; the triad of time: past, present and future; the triad of human nature: mind, body and soul and the Holy Trinity: The Father, The Son and the Holy Spirit… like an allusion to the sacred status of the child in our contemporary western societies.

images from Triptychs

Leo De Bock

“My focus has always been on people: how they survive, how they suffer or fight injustice, how they love, how they care, how they live, how they pursue their ambitions, how they die. I am particularly fascinated by the consequences of population ageing.” -Leo De Bock


Images from Growing Old in Roumania

I think it’s important that we look at ourselves, warts and all, through all aspects of our lives. It’s what keeps us real and allows us to celebrate every part of our aging process. Belgium photographer, Leo De Bock has been engaged in the human condition for a long time. Currently associated with the international photo agency www.reporters.be, Leo started his career as a tv-reporter.

In the 1990’s, Leo became known for his work as a documentary film maker. He was the first and only to do an in-depth documentary about the consequences brought about by the building of the Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze river in Middle China. Eight years after the disaster in Tchernobyl (Ukrain), he reported about the many young families still awaiting evacuation in the 30 kilometer danger zone. His documentaries won several international awards.

I am featuring work from two series, Growing Old in Roumania and Worlds of Forgetfulness, both insightful looks into what comes at the end of life.

Population ageing is
unprecedented, without parallel in the history of humanity. Increases in the
proportions of older persons (60 years or older) are being accompanied by
declines in the proportions of the young (under age 15). By 2050, the number of
older persons in the world will exceed the number of young for the first time
in history. Moreover, by 1998 this historic reversal in relative proportions of
young and old had already taken place in the more developed regions. 

Population ageing is pervasive, a global phenomenon affecting every man, woman and child. The steady increase of older age groups in national populations, both in absolute numbers and in relation to the working-age population, has a direct bearing on the intergenerational and intragenerational equity and solidarity that are the foundations of society. Population ageing is also enduring. During the twentieth century the proportion of older persons continued to rise, and this trend is expected to continue into the twenty-first century. The proportion of older persons is projected to reach 21 per cent in 2050 (scource: UN-report ‘World Population Ageing 1950-2050).

“Working for the Flemish Public Health Department, I got particularly interested in the increasing number of people suffering from dementia. Society as it is now, is not prepared for this tsunami. Dealing with dementia requires a serious reorganization of the social and medical system and in particular, an urgent need to revalue home care. I noticed many people are ignorant about what dementia really implies. I try to tell them. My photos try to tell them.”

“Population ageing has a specific meaning in former communist countries like the largely forgotten Roumania. In a communist state citizenswere relevant to progress in that they worked and helped produce. Hence, people who were no longer active, like the elder, were of little importance.  With the number of old people only growing, the issues becomes more acute. A catch-up is urgently needing. Yet, this exactly what does not happen. I visited old people on the countryside, living isolated, depending solely on home care workers to help them survive. They are poor, sometimes lonely, sad, but they do not give up their pride.” 

Images from Worlds of Forgetfullness

Submit and Upcoming Workshops and Events

The next LENSCRATCH exhibition is on your HOME TOWN.  Please send one image of your home town (72dpi, 1000px on the long side, in jpg format) and include:


Name, title, location, link  (Aline Smithson, Lego Hollywood, Los Angeles, CA, http://www.alinesmithson.com)

Send to: [email protected] BEFORE August 20th
Aline Smithson, Lego Hollywood, Los Angeles, CA



2012 FotoWeek DC International Awards Competition

Challenge the Way We Look at the World
FotoWeekDC’s 5th Annual International Awards Competition is looking for extraordinary images – we’re looking for yours! The 2012 competition will honor professional and emerging photographers from our region and from around the world.
  • Cash prizes totaling $20,000
  • Winning images will be exhibited and/or projected during FotoWeekDC, November 9-18 as well as online.
  • Winners will be selected by a distinguished panel of world-renowned judges
  • Winners will be notified on or about October 5, 2012

________________________________________________________________________________

I have a really full fall, teaching in Los Angeles at the Julia Dean Photo Workshops, but also teaching and reviewing at a variety of photo events around the country, so thought I’d share my schedule in case you happen to be in the area! The expansion of photography festivals only reflects our growing community and lucky for us that we can benefit from the exposure, the education, the ability to share work and make new connections.

Fall classes at the Julia Dean Photo Workshops can be found here.


I will also be at the Santa Fe Workshops next spring (I believe the 3rd week of March), again teaching, The Big Picture. Details to follow.

In San Diego, from September 6-8th, the inaugural launch of the Medium Festival Of Photography will kick off with a keynote lecture by Alec Soth, speaking on Sept 6th.  The festival includes workshops, lectures, artist lectures, portfolio reviews, and exhibitions.

I will be reviewing and be teaching the workshop, Preparing for Portfolio Reviews on September 7th.

Filter Photo Festival takes place in Chicago and is a week long festival with lectures, workshops, portfolio reviews, exhibitions, and connections. The keynote speaker will be the compelling, Brian Ulrich, on Thursday, October 18th.

Filter is an organization dedicated
to producing the Midwest’s premier photography event, the annual Filter
Photo Festival.  The Festival’s ongoing mission is to connect em
erging,
mid-level, and professional photographers from across the country with
gallerists, educators, curators, editors, and other elite photo
professionals, focusing
particularly on those of the Midwest.”

I will be reviewing at the event and teaching The Art of Presentation: Showing your work to the fine art market (presented by the Santa Fe workshops) on Wednesday, October 16th, from 9am-1pm.  This workshop will get you ready for reviews and help you contextualize your work in the fine art world.  There are also terrific workshops in addition to mine, lectures, portfolio reviews, and lots of connecting and celebrating of photography.

This year The Center for Fine Art Photography in Fort Collins, CO will be hosting the SPE Southwest regional conference. Running from November 1st-5th, It will be 4-5 days filled with lectures, artist presentations, exhibitions, and networking.  More specific programing to follow.

I will be giving an artist’s lecture, will have a solo exhibition at the Center for Fine Art Photography, will be giving a workshop, and participating as a reviewer for SPE.  SPE events are open to ALL photographers, and they are incredibly informative and interesting.

The keynote speak of this year’s event is the amazing Phillip Toledano.

Foto DC is a week long event from November 9-18th that is filled with exhibitions, workshops, lectures, and portfolio reviews.


On Sunday, November 11th, I will be teaching a workshop for emerging photographers on how to create a fine art portfolio.




PhotoNOLA is an annual festival of photography in New Orleans, coordinated by the New Orleans Photo Alliance in partnership with galleries, museums and photographers citywide.
The 2012 festival will take place from November 29 – December 2
with broad ranging photography exhibitions on display throughout the
month. The lineup includes portfolio reviews, workshops, lectures,
demonstrations and a kick-off gala at the Musée Conti Historical Wax
Museum. Many events are free and open to the public.
Portfolio Review registration will open on September 5, and the reviewers list will be announced in August.

I will be teaching a workshop and reviewing at PhotoNOLA this year.  Dates and details to follow.




Hope to see you somewhere!




Things to Submit to!

The next LENSCRATCH exhibition is on your HOME TOWN.  Please send one image of your home town (72dpi, 1000px on the long side, in jpg format) and include:


Name, title, location, link  (Aline Smithson, Lego Hollywood, Los Angeles, CA, http://www.alinesmithson.com)


Send to: [email protected]

Aline Smithson, Lego Hollywood, Los Angeles, CA
I have the great pleasure of juroring two upcoming calls…

Announcing Love + Lust

Lust is an intense appetite, craving, or untamed desire. We lust for an array of things—money, power, objects, sex, or just living life. Love is a powerful
affection or personal attachment and comes in a variety of forms, which
can encompass romantic, sexual, platonic, narcissistic, or 
even religious feelings or attitudes. And sometimes love and lust overlap. Show us your interpretations. Who or what do you love or lust for? 
What images capture these emotions for you?


Portraits,
fashion, editorial, landscape, documentary, conceptual, or any other
genre is open for consideration. Color, b&w, iPhone, or 
alternative processes are all eligible.




Book Title: Open to interpretation

Theme: Love + Lust
Judge: Aline Smithson, LENSCRATCH
Submission Fee: $40 for 5 images, $10 additional

Deadline for submission: January 10, 2013
Results Announced: January 23, 2013
Results Posted Online: February 6, 2013
Awards: $1,000 Cover Image + $500 Judge’s Selection Award

2012 FotoWeek DC International Awards Competition

Challenge the Way We Look at the World
FotoWeekDC’s 5th Annual International Awards Competition is looking for extraordinary images – we’re looking for yours! The 2012 competition will honor professional and emerging photographers from our region and from around the world.

  • Cash prizes totaling $20,000
  • Winning images will be exhibited and/or projected during FotoWeekDC, November 9-18 as well as online.
  • Winners will be selected by a distinguished panel of world-renowned judges
  • Winners will be notified on or about October 5, 2012.

Back by popular demand—People’s Choice Award! 
Your entries will be judged by a distinguished panel of industry experts, who will select the top 3 winners in each category. Now, by voting in the People’s Choice category, your friends and fans will have a say too. The top 20 images with the most number of votes across all of the categories will win extra recognition, and will be seen by an even broader audience.
The People’s Choice Award Prizes:
One free FotoPage Annual Subscription for each winning photographer and online exposure through a top 20 feature on FotoDC.org’s People’s Choice Gallery.

Monika Merva

When checking to find the results of the Center of Fine Art Photography’s Portrait Exhibition, jurored by the impeccable gallerist, Anna Walker Skillman, of Jackson Fine Art in Atlanta, I truly moved by Monika Merva’s winning image. Monika’s project, City of Children, was published by Kehrer Verlag Heidelberg—Berlin in 2011 and the work has been well celebrated. Today, however, I am sharing some of Monika’s other work–portraits and a new project that is in the beginning stages and without a statement. I am also sharing some of her wonderful portraits.

Her image, Doki, won first prize at the C4FAP, but also garnered 2nd place Second Place at the 2011 FotoWeek DC International Awards Competition. Monikas’s work is represented in the permanent collections of the Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris; Hungarian Museum of Photography, Kecskemét; Worcester Art Museum, Massachusetts; and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

Work in Progress

Doki

Portraits

David Ellingsen

I truly believe that most of us create work from some thread of our childhood, drawing upon references and influences and events. David Ellingsen was raised on Cortes Island, a remote community of 1000 residents in Canada’s Pacific Northwest, on a small family farm surrounded by forest and ocean. As an adult, David became a well-regarded commercial photographer gleaning advertising and editorial assignments from The New York Times Magazine, People, and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, among many others. But David also has been able to create a parallel photo life, with a fine art resume reflecting dozens of exhibitions worldwide with numerous international awards and honors. It is his fine art work that brings him back to his childhood roots, to a focus that is steeped in the natural world. For the two series featured below, David uses of the now discontinued Polaroid 55PN film to capture images that demonstrate a broad tonal range and are and processed and archivally printed.

from Sea Life

“I have always felt a conflict between my rural upbringing and my adult urban life, and it is from this tension that I find the inspiration for my photographs. The values and lifestyle of the family farm where I grew up on Cortes Island formed in me a strong relationship with the environment and the cycles of the natural order. As I entered adulthood I left the island and readily embraced life in the city and the modern urban experience, and still do to a great extent, but that kinship with nature began to quietly seep away. This unwelcome disassociation inspires in me a navigation back to a harmonious place between the extremes and the compelling urge to create work about this journey.”

I am featuring two projects, the first, Hibernus, which opens as an exhibition at Akasha Art Projects in Toronto tonight and runs through February 4th, and a second project, Sea Life, that I enjoyed exploring as one of the Critical Mass submissions.

Hibernus: Collected in winter during the final stages of their life, the botanical subjects for this series were chosen for their beauty of form and graphic possibilities. Additionally, and more importantly, they represented a respect and appreciation for the value of the latter part of the life cycle. The Polaroid 55PN film used to capture this collection – an excellent, fine-grained, textured film, rich with organic imperfections—was also at the end of its lifespan. Due to the changing demands in photographic technology 55PN was discontinued in 2008, despite its decades of peerless performance.

In simple terms, the subjects and the medium were chosen in supportive tandem, referencing the beauty and significance in what has aged.

Sea Life: The creatures contained in this collection of photographs are not intended to be a concise record but rather a feeling…a fascination…a darkness. I return often to a shaded beauty in my photographs and this portrayal of these denizens of the deep seems an accurate metaphor for our times. Using part of my last supplies of Polaroid’s beautifully flawed Type 55PN film, now extinct in itself, and drawing on the historical darkroom processes of Man Ray and the botanical studies of Karl Blossfeldt, I was compelled to create a response to the ongoing decline of the planet’s oceans.

I shall leave words on the state of the ocean environment to Mr. Rex Weyler, whose accompanying essay for this series speaks to that subject with great eloquence. For my part, the creation of this body of work was simply a reaction to the overwhelming, paralyzing flood of environmental reports coupled with a sensitivity that grew from an upbringing on a remote island surrounded by the sea in a community where harmony with the environment is not only revered, but very often essential to immediate quality of life.

At its core I intend this work to be a part of the wider environmental discussion, contributing to awareness and helping to fuel the great call to action that, at this late hour, is imperative we clearly hear.

G. M. B. Akash

Today, I count myself blessed, having become a photographer. To be able to articulate the experiences of the voiceless, to bring their identity to the forefront, gives meaning and purpose to my own life, aptly stated by GMB Akash, a photographer who uses his passion to change the lives of those who can’t tell their own stories. He has received more than 40 international awards from all around the world and his work has been featured in over 50 major international publications including: National Geographic, Vogue, Time, Sunday Times, Newsweek, Geo, Stern,Der Spiegel, The Fader,Brand Ein, The Guardian, Marie Claire, Colors, The Economist, The New Internationalist, Kontinente, Amnesty Journal, Courier International, PDN, Die Zeit, Days Japan, Hello, and Sunday Telegraph of London. In 2009, GMB won the international ‘Travel photographer of the year ‘title from the international travel photographer of the year competition ( TPOY 2009 ), the most prestigious award in travel photography, UK.

I wrote about Mr. Akash on Lenscratch two years ago, sharing his riveting work from Nothing to Hold Onto, about train travel in Bangladesh and Life at the Dump Yard, about trash pickers. You can read more about GMB in this Tiffin Box interview.

GMB recently wrote me about his opportunity to lecture at TEDxO’Porto 2011 in Portugal, featured in the You Tube below. This also sent me back to his website and I am featuring work from his heartbreaking series, Born to Work, about child labor in Bangladesh. I had a hard time editing this project, so I am sharing more images than usual.

 

Born to work: Child labour is not a new issue in Bangladesh. as children remain here one of the most vulnerable groups living under threats of hunger, illiteracy, displacement, exploitation, trafficking, physical and mental abuse. Although the issue of child labor has always been discussed, there is hardly any remarkable progress even in terms of mitigation.

17.5 percent of total children of the 5-15 age group are engaged in economic activities. many of this children are engage in various hazardous occupations in manufacturing factories. factory owners prefer to employ children as they could pay them less and also able to keep their factories free from trade unionism. a child labour gets taka 400 to 700 ( 1 USD = 70 taka) per month, while an adult worker earns up to taka 5000 per month.