Tag Archives: Institute Of Art

Grant Gill interviews Sarah Moore

Introducing editorial assistant Grant Gil as he shares a recent interview he conducted with Sarah Moore….

For the past few months I have been very grateful not only for being able to help out with LENSCRATCH but also getting to know Aline as a colleague and friend.  This spring, I will be finishing my last semester at the Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design with a focus on photography.  This opportunity has been a great educational tool in submersing myself in the variety of different works posted everyday, and also has let me view the art making world from a different perspective.
I was first introduced to Sarah Moore’s work after she had been featured in Fraction Magazine, and since then we have constantly crossed paths without actually formally meeting.  I then begun following her journey across country, from Philadelphia to Santa Fe, able to watch her work change and adapt based on location. I find myself transfixed on her beautiful landscapes that make me yearn for travel, but even more so I am fascinated with her raw interactions with nature that translate emotional isolation and loneliness.  Because of her young age, emerging status, and her stamina to continuously work I am constantly inspired to do more, work harder.  Today I am showing images from two of her series: expanse and Scape.

Sarah Moore was born and raised in South Dakota, where she still finds much of her inspiration for her work. She received her BFA in Photography from the Rhode Island School of Design in 2009 and has since lived and traveled throughout the country. Much of Sarah’s work deals with the ideas of loneliness, escaping, and the ways landscapes inform and shape us. Her work has been shown throughout the country and online. She is currently living and working in Santa Fe, NM, where she is trying to understand the harsh light and delve into the book-making world.

expanse:
Throughout the years I have become increasingly interested in my home of South Dakota and how the people and place shaped me and continue to influence me. Even though I appreciate many aspects of the Midwest and still long for its landscape, it represents the pinnacle of loneliness in my life.

My photography is a depiction of this loneliness. The landscapes of the Midwest are beautiful but empty, simple but overwhelming. My relationship to my home is based on love, but also thwarted by distance. Since moving from South Dakota, I continue to find solace but also conflict in the land around me. I now see many moments in my life as a way to document or construct a personal narrative of isolation, both representative of my past and indicative of my present.

Expanses can be comforting but also stifling. Distances can fuel love but also misunderstanding. The vast space of the land is something I can’t quite embrace, break free from, or understand, but it provides infinite inspiration for me.

What is you personal statement as
an artist, or how exactly would you describe the work you make?
Most of my work comes from a very personal and emotional
place.  I photograph mostly
landscapes and self-portraits.  I
started doing both in 2007, when I went back home to South Dakota to
shoot.  Focusing on landscapes has
always allowed me to break free from the personal connections I have with
people.  Still though, I love
portraiture and what a person can show in a photograph, so self-portraiture is
a way for me to still use a person in my photography, while still keeping the
work mainly about me.
Is this personal place derived from
a specific event, or just a general emotional state?
It’s a little of both. 
My parents divorced when I was four because my dad is gay.  This is something I’ve more than come
to terms with now, but it was tough to deal with while growing up in the
conservative Midwest.  I think the
divorce and the subsequent silence my family kept about it instilled a sense of
“me versus the world.”  I grew up thinking it was best to keep quiet about big issues,
especially emotional ones.  Then I
eventually thought it was just best to keep quiet in general.  So I spent my years in South Dakota
sort of closing myself off from everyone, not knowing how or if I should share
the important parts of myself.
After leaving South Dakota, I learned that even if I have
some trust issues and some issues with the way my problems were handled, I can
still try to share a part of myself through my photography.  If loneliness was going to be such a
big part of my life then I wanted to at least make it part of my work.
I read so much visual poetry in to
your work, from the breath taking sights to the self-portraits that begin to
blend in with the surroundings.  I
see this action of back and forth between the photographs and the
photographer.  I wonder why you
choose to turn the camera inwards?
Photographing myself started about six years ago, when I
first went back to South Dakota.  I
wanted to put a person in the overwhelming landscape, and I was the most
accessible.  Throughout the years,
I’ve learned that one of the best ways to portray what a landscape and a moment
mean to me is to photograph myself. 
I think my self-portraiture is definitely part
narcissism.  But then again, isn’t
most photography rather narcissistic? 
As photographers, we capture what or whom we want to be seen and how we
want them seen.  It can be a very
selfish medium.  Yet by showing
others what or who we see, maybe we can also affect or help others. 
Another part of turning the camera towards myself deals with
my own issues of insecurity and loneliness.  I don’t like images of myself, and in real life, I’m not often
apt to open up to people.  I have
too many walls built up.  I guess
through photography I allow myself, my body, my face, and my emotions to take
center stage.  I get to act a
bit.  I get to be important.  And I hopefully get to communicate with
others through my images.
Do you have any specific
philosophies when it comes to humans and their interactions with nature?  What books, or even other work, do you look
to when making the images you do?
I’m still trying to figure out what and how I feel about the
human interaction with nature.  I
know my own relationship to nature is pretty complicated.  Though I grew up in a rural place, with
large expanses of land all around me, I still never felt really in tune with
nature.  And after living in cities
for seven years, I felt even more detached from nature.  Yet, I long for the land.  I think many people do.  I think there’s something in us that
wants to be closer to nature, but we’re not sure how to do that in this
increasingly electronic and cement culture.
People go camping or gazing at national parks, feeling for a
moment that they’re immersed in their primitive roots.  That’s about as close to nature as many
live.  People like to be able to
feel close to the land while at the same time in control of it.  I’m the same way, I admit.  I bring my camera to the land with me,
perhaps trying to harness my own little bit of control over the wild vastness.
Years ago, when I was starting my photography project in
South Dakota, I looked a lot at Todd Hido and Larry Sultan’s work.  I read a lot of theories about
photography and families at that time too.  For the past few years, I’ve been reading way too much David
Foster Wallace.  His work doesn’t
deal with nature explicitly, but it does talk about human society and our
alienation from each other, the landscape, and ourselves.  I think I’m more interested in reading
about the human psyche and weird outbursts in society than I am about humans
versus nature. 
Do you ever feel you are having a
visual conversation with other landscape and travel photographers, both
historically and in the contemporary?
It’s hard not to feel that way, honestly.  There are a lot of landscape and travel
photographers out there.  Sometimes
I’m constantly comparing my work to others’, but I try to maintain my own
vision and keep a peace with myself. 
I get overwhelmed really easily and intimidated even more easily.  It’s definitely important to be aware
of your peers, both contemporary and historically, but it’s also important to
forge ahead on your own.  I think
part of the reason I was in a rut while living in Philly was that I was just
too scared to make images.  I
thought everyone saw better places, had better ideas, and executed their ideas
better.  So I just stopped
creating. Obviously that’s not a good answer, so now I try to keep in tune with
other work (especially landscape and self-portraiture), but I also just try to
create for myself.
There is a lot of reference to time
passing and travel within all of your work.  In Scape there is this feeling that nothing is
constant, like you are drifting from place to place.
I’ve never been good at photographing in my own backyard, so
to speak.  For one reason or
another, escaping has become increasingly important or my photography.  That has meant escaping back to where I
grew up, escaping all over the country, and escaping to large city parks outside
of the city.
My first large travel experience, photographically, was in
the fall of 2011, when I made my work in Scape.  I mostly went on that trip because it had been about two
years since I really photographed. Living in Philadelphia after college put me
in some sort of photographic and emotional rut, so the only way I thought to
get out of it was to travel and see again.  That trip was literally about escaping and reinventing.
I love traveling and seeing new places, especially
landscapes.  That will probably
never go away in me.  Yet, I also
really need to travel to be alone sometimes.  As I’ve mentioned, loneliness (or my illusion of it) is
partially ingrained in me, and I’ve found that traveling to different
landscapes helps me cope with my loneliness. 
I am aware that you just moved out
to Santa Fe, NM.  It seems like you
have lived in some very different places in America’s geography.  Does shifting
home this much affect your work?
Yes, it definitely does.  Each place I’ve lived has a different geography and
different social climate.  Even
though I’m not great at photographing where I live, I’m trying to get better at
that.  When I lived in Ohio, I had
a realization that I was going to be in this strange place for about a year, so
I had to make the most of it with my photography.  That’s when I started photographing the large parks in and
around Columbus.  I tried in some
way to make the Ohio land a part of me.
I’m still trying to grasp the New Mexico landscape and how
this is home for me now.  It seems
that once I get used to a place, especially geographically, I move.  It takes time for me to acclimate to a
landscape, and the New Mexico one is especially difficult.  I’m not used to intense sun or
mountains, not to mention adobe architecture and small pueblos.  It’s more of a “wild” land
than most places I’ve lived, which is hard for me to grasp photographically,
strangely enough.
Overall, shifting my homes helps reopen my eyes to the
constants and changes in my art and myself.  I’m starting to learn which terrains I appreciate and which
light I want to follow.  I also
really enjoy the challenge of trying to make a place my own, especially through
my photography.
Why exactly do you think it is so
hard photographing your direct surroundings?  Does the familiar become too mundane?
I think in some ways, I feel too close to my immediate
surroundings.  It’s not that I find
the familiar mundane–in fact, I’m constantly inspired by what I see.  I actually tend to post photos on Instagram
of every mundane moment I have or see. 
Yet, when it comes to my other photography–the work I think about more
and use my “real” cameras for–I always seem to need to go away to
make that work.
I try to delve into some part of my emotional past and
present when photographing portraits and landscapes.  And I think in order for me to do that, at least right now,
I need to go outside of my comfort zone, outside of my immediate space.  Unfamiliar landscapes–even if they’re
within mere miles of where I work, eat, and sleep–help me disconnect from my
everyday life and find a part of myself that I want to explore more.
Nothing is really mundane to me.  I just find different types of inspiration in different
places.
Because nature is quite vast, and
easily accessible, are there specific images that you strive for, that you go
out to shoot, or is there spontaneity to your photographs?
When photographing in South Dakota, I usually have specific
shots that I strive for.  I know
that landscape pretty well, and I know that it’s largely the same view
everywhere you look.  So I know
that I need to look for a certain type of field or certain color palette when
I’m there.  I try to use the
repetition of that landscape to my advantage, which sometimes takes a lot of
pre-visualization and some sketches.
When I’m traveling to different landscapes in shorter
periods of time, I tend to shoot more and shoot very spontaneously.  Unfamiliar landscapes force me to be
more spontaneous, and spontaneity forces me to try more things and make more
images.
I like both methods of shooting, if they’re methods at
all.  I love the slowness of my
South Dakota photography, and how it allows me to think about that one specific
landscape over the years.  Of
course, I also love seeing a wide variety of terrains within a short period of
time. The diversity of the land allows me to think about how to connect all
those terrains into my life.
You deal with many over arching
themes, so how do you declare a body of work finished?  Does it necessarily finish when you
move, such as when you left Ohio, or is there potential for it to continue?
I think there’s always some potential for most of my
projects to continue, especially my work in South Dakota.  I’d love to continue to photograph in
Ohio as well, and since my dad lives there, that will probably happen in the
future.  On some level, I do
declare a body of work finished once I move, since it’s easy to wrap up
projects at that point.  Yet, since
I go back to both South Dakota and Ohio so often, I’d like to keep both of
those projects open for a while.
My work in Scape is definitely finished though; at least I’m
finished making the images.  That
project, though I didn’t know it at the time, was about a specific journey at a
specific time in my life.  It
chronicles a road trip around the country during a time when I needed it
most.  Though I definitely plan on
going on more road trips in the future, they won’t fit into what Scape became, because
I’m not in the same personal space as I was then.
I also see many of my separate projects as part of a general
whole body of work.  All of my
photography deals with escapism, alienation, self-searching, and the land.  I don’t see an “end” to that whole
project anytime soon.  So for now,
everything is sort of left open.

Scape
These photographs document a journey through America. They are images of wonder and excitement,pain and loneliness, and my personal ideas of self. Additionally, they are portraits of America’s land.

I often can’t relate to America as it’s depicted through the media’s eyes. I find it difficult live up to cultural standards and societal expectations. I have trouble getting close to those closest to me. Yet, when I see America—the America of such diverse, beautiful, and nuanced terrain—I find that even if I can’t understand what America has become, what people around me have become, or what I’ve become, I can feel comfort in the landscapes.

This collection is vast. Not every photo is perfect. Immense meaning won’t be found at every turn. Rather, the photos are a way for me to both explore and escape where I live and who I am.
































Jon Horvath, Untitled (from Wide Eyed)

Jon Horvath, Untitled (from Wide Eyed)

Jon Horvath

Untitled (from Wide Eyed),
Winslow, Arizona, 2012
From the Wide Eyed series
Website – JonHorvath.net

Jon Horvath is an artist and educator residing in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He received his MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2008. His work has been exhibited nationally in galleries including: The Print Center (Philadelphia), Macy Gallery at Columbia University (New York), Philadelphia Photo Arts Center, and The Detroit Center for Contemporary Photography. His work is currently held in the permanent collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, The Haggerty Museum of Art, and is included in the Midwest Photographers Project at The Museum of Contemporary Photography. Horvath was a finalist for the The Greater Milwaukee Foundation's 2009 and 2010 Mary L. Nohl Emerging Artist Fellowship. In 2011, he was named a US Flash Forward winner by The Magenta Foundation. Horvath currently teaches at The University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and The Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design.

Greer Muldowney, Cheung Sha Wan #3

Greer Muldowney, Cheung Sha Wan #3

Greer Muldowney

Cheung Sha Wan #3,
Kowloon, Hong Kong, 2010
From the 6,426 per km2 series
Website – GreerMuldowney.com

Greer Muldowney is an artist and photography professor based in Boston, Massachusetts. She received an undergraduate degree in Political Science and Studio Art from Clark University, and MFA from the Savannah College of Art and Design. She has worked for photographers Stephen DiRado and Henry Horenstein, and has acted as the curator for the Desotorow Gallery in Savannah, GA and as an assistant curator at the Panopticon Gallery and Panopticon Imaging in Boston, MA. She currently teaches at the New Hampshire Institute of Art and the New England Institute of Art.

Greer Muldowney

I was delighted to meet Boston photographer, Greer Muldowney, at the recent Flash Forward Festival in Boston.  Greer has been navigating the photographic waters for some time, studying with Stephen DiRado and Frank Armstrong while pursuing a degree in Political Science and Studio Art at Clark University, assisting Henry Horenstein, working at the Panopticon Gallery, and ultimately settling down into the MFA program at the Savannah College of Art and Design. While at SCAD, Greer was selected by the faculty to work on a documentary project in the Sham Shui Po district of Hong Kong. The result was her thesis exhibition, 6,426 per km2, that I am featuring below. Having now graduated, Greer begins her second year teaching at the New Hampshire Institute of Art and the New England Institute of Art, has exhibited worldwide and curated exhibits in China and in the U.S. She recently curated Alter-Ego II at the Nave Gallery, and will be exhibiting her own work in a solo exhibition through the Griffin Museum this fall.

Having recently visited China this past fall,  I am struck by Greer’s ability to bring elegance and a sense calm to a landscape of densely packed vertical living, an environment seemingly stripped of the sounds and smells of millions of human beings pressing against each other in their quest for a better life.

Images from 6,426 per km2

While there I realized that my previous understanding of urban policy, or at least my education in the American system, clearly did not apply to the Hong Kong system of public housing, infrastructure, or any ramifications of sustainability (not that the states have truly awakened to sustainability, either). I decided that while I was not working on the documentary, I would build my thesis around making imagery that was an allegory for western perception on this urban landscape; making imagery as beautiful as possible, mostly in response to the media fatigue I felt in regards to Chinese-American international policy.

Statement for 6,426 per km2At 6,426 people per km2, Hong Kong boasts the most densely populated urban center in the world. The reality of sustainable practices, depletion of resources and a shifting global power paradigm pervade media involving China, and its Western syndicate territory, Hong Kong.

By making imagery in this unique region(both socially and politically), I ask viewers to contemplate these issues, but to also see these places as homes; not statistics. As the living cities and infrastructure that address cultural standards and progressive technologies.

These photographs do not propose a reality so different from the spin of contemporary media, but asks an audience on the other side of the world, the Western world, to reflect on whether these images provide a surrogate for wonderment or trepidation for a changing global climate and future.

Mike Rebholz, Hardin Road (Montana 87)

Mike Rebholz, Hardin Road (Montana 87)

Mike Rebholz

Hardin Road (Montana 87),
Billings, Montana, 2006
From the American Beauty series
Website – MikeRebholz.com

Mike Rebholz (b.1954, Milwaukee Wisconsin). Is an architectural photographer living and working in Madison, Wisconsin. He studied at the Milwaukee Center for Photography and has taught at the Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design. His photographic interests are vernacular architecture, the built landscape and portraiture that explores the confluence of shelter and American culture . His projects range from documentation of ice fishing in Wisconsin. the changing Midwest landscape and vernacular architecture as a reflection of idiosyncratic individuality. His solo exhibitions Speaking in the Vernacular and 10 Weeks: Ice Fishing in Wisconsin have exhibited at the Michael H. Lord Gallery in Palm Springs California and the work from 10 Weeks is represented in the Chicago Project at Catherine Edelman Gallery, Chicago Illinois. His current project American Beauty is a examination of the intersection of industrial scale agribusiness, energy production and existing American land culture and the resulting changes in the American way of life.

Joshua Ballew

When I first saw Joshua Ballew’s work, I knew we had something in common. For years, I would collect shopping lists I’d find in grocery carts and keep them to reread the scrawled rosters of much needed items.  They were poignant and insightful and ultimately odd and ordinary.  The handwriting, the miss spellings, and that one quirky item that gives you a window into the person adds to the experience.

Joshua also collects grocery lists for his project, Archive of the Ordinary.

Image from Archives of the Ordinary

The series featured today is a wonderful exploration of items he has come across in various books.  Between the Sheets are little messages or totems that connect us to another human and offer a sense of history and what has come before.  

Joshua is working towards his BFA in Photography at The Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design (MIAD) and living in his hometown of Milwaukee, WI.   His work questions “What do the
objects we use reflect about our character”? By utilizing mundane, yet
personal items he investigates what can be revealed by creating typologies of similar objects. The collected work exposes something about the person the items are connected to, but also reflect items that are banal and wonderfully unique at the same time. 
Between The
Sheets
– This series
examines the peculiar relationship between used “romance” novels and the small
items I find within each book. I am motivated by the simple question,
“What do the objects we use reveal about our character?” My process of searching
through the shelves of bookstores and thrift shops is deliberate, while the
discovery and variety of items left behind is unexpected. 

Each diptych exists as a faceless portrait of the previous owner offering more questions than definitive answers. Pairing the items with an image of the pages on which they were found, allows for the banality of each item to contrast the sensational lines of text and titles of each book. This disparity between the real and the ideal becomes the focus of the work, speaking directly to the desire of escapism fulfilled within the pages of each book. 

Tony Luong, Mom Applying Make-Up

Tony Luong, Mom Applying Make-Up

Tony Luong

Mom Applying Make-Up,
Clinton, Connecticut, 2011
From the Two Roofs series
Website – TonyLuong.com

Tony Luong was born in Connecticut in 1987. His family moved to the United States two years before he was born to escape the Vietnam war. He graduated with a BFA in photography from the New England Institute of Art in 2010. His work mainly revolves around his family's background and what it means to be a first generation citizen. His work has been exhibited throughout Boston and through several online publications. His editorial work has appeared in publications such as Hemispheres Magazine, Financial Times, London and Vibe Magazine, among others. He recently published a small book of photographs from his ongoing project Two Roofs. Tony lives in Cambridge, MA where he is a freelance editorial and fine art photographer.

Tony Luong, Mom Applying Make-Up

Tony Luong, Mom Applying Make-Up

Tony Luong

Mom Applying Make-Up,
Clinton, Connecticut, 2011
From the Two Roofs series
Website – TonyLuong.com

Tony Luong was born in Connecticut in 1987. His family moved to the United States two years before he was born to escape the Vietnam war. He graduated with a BFA in photography from the New England Institute of Art in 2010. His work mainly revolves around his family's background and what it means to be a first generation citizen. His work has been exhibited throughout Boston and through several online publications. His editorial work has appeared in publications such as Hemispheres Magazine, Financial Times, London and Vibe Magazine, among others. He recently published a small book of photographs from his ongoing project Two Roofs. Tony lives in Cambridge, MA where he is a freelance editorial and fine art photographer.