Tag Archives: Independent Curator

Food For Your Eyes DOT Com

Dear readers,

My apologizes, this blog has been in silent mode for a long time…not because nothing happens in Food For Your Eyes Land. Here is a round up page of past projects. Although, it’s true that for a while Twitter (@foodforyoureyes) caught me for its micro blogging attraction and immediate reactivity. This time is fadding a bit on my opinion, maybe because too much people are talking about the same (photographic) things so no one seems to listen to each other.

At a point I thought to transform this blog. But to what? to another tumblr on photography? Finally I took the decision to create www.foodforyoureyes.com, as I own the .com for many years. This is your new destination for everything related to FOOD FOR YOUR EYES .

As an independent curator my focus is on contemporary photography from all corners of the globe with a special interest in photobook makers . Check out the recent project I have been doing for Nofound Photo Fair in Paris November 2012 : Photographers & Book Makers show

However, foodforyoureyes @tumblr  will stay mainly as an archives (it exists since 2007!),  and news blog. Who knows, maybe I would have a delicious idea to feed the tumblr machine and keep blogging again! Stay tuned

Thank you for visiting, following and reading

Greetings from Paris

Nathalie


apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

  • “Imagine a place where a thousand of your best photo friends and heroes have taken over an artsy southern town,” says Andrew Owen, managing director of this weekend’s Look3 Festival in Charlottesville, VA, “and over three days you take in a dozen gallery exhibits, eat at outdoor cafes between talks by legendary photographers, see new work from photographers working all over the world, and return home exhausted and inspired.” That’s where we’ll be for the next few days, in part presenting a special exhibition, the Aperture at Sixty Library, which will showcase highlights from Aperture’s many years of publishing. La Lettre de La Photographie profiles exhibitions at the festival by Hank Willis Thomas, Alex Webb, Bruce Gilden, Stanley Greene, and many more. NYTimes‘ LENS blog takes a closer look at Thomas’ work, LA Times‘ Framework interviews Mitch Dobrowner, whose work is also featured at Look3, and Time‘s LightBox speaks with guest curators Vincent Musi and David Griffin.
  • More in festival coverage, Flak Photo offers four free days of live streaming lectures and panel discussions from the Flash Forward Festival, emerging photographers from Canada, the US and the UK, in Boston, MA at Fairmont Battery Wharf, June 7 – 10, 2012, presented in part by the Magenta Foundation. Download the festival catalogue here, and check out the full calendar of events.
  • Meanwhile in Europe, PhotoEspana has gotten underway. Of particular interest: Image Anxiety, curated by Chinese independent curator Huang Du, and of course, the annual Photobooks of the Year exhibition. In other international festival and fair news, the word is out that Paris Photo will launch a Los Angeles edition in April, 2013 at the Paramount Studios, as reported by the LA Times and the British Journal of Photography.
  • NPR’s Claire O’Neill heads on a trip to the New York Times’ “Lively Morgue,” their basement newspaper archive which contains five-to-six million photographic prints and contact sheets, overseen by Jeff Roth, mined and disseminated on the Times’ brilliant Tumblr site by photo editor Darcy Eveleigh and others.
  • “Sometimes it takes me two hours to get down a street, because there are so many things to photograph and people to meet,” writes Magnum photographer Jacob Aue Sobol in his latest entry from Beijing for Leica Camera Blog’s fascinating Arrivals and Departures series, unfolding live. Follow Sobol’s journey along the Trans Siberian Railway, “from the Russian forests to the Mongolian desert and finally through the mountains to Beijing,” shooting black-and-white every step–quite literally–along the way with the Leica’s new digital monochrome-only camera. Episode five, offers up a stunning gallery of images–dynamic, saturated street photos that remind us of work by Eikoh Hosoe from Barakei.
  • Another historical archive of photographs has emerged in New York at the New York Public Library. A “visual encyclopedia” of 41,000 prints by Walker Evans, Dorothea Lange and others have recently been found, many digitized and now made available to the public on a special NYPL site. Originally compiled and organized  in the 30s and 40s by Roy Stryker, founder of the Farm Securities Administration’s photography project, many of the prints were in a public lending library until the 50s. ”Incredibly,” writes James Estrin for NY Times’ LENS blog, “anyone with a library card could check out an original print of a Dorothea Lange image and put it on their wall for a while. It’s easy to imagine that some were never returned.”
  • Find images of the once-in-a-lifetime Venus in Transit event which happens every 105 years or so, from LA TimesFramework, Boston‘s Big Picture, WSJ‘s Photo Journal, Conscientious, and The Atlantic‘s In Focus. Marvin Heiferman, author of the new book Photography Changes Everything (Aperture 2012), shared this great link on his twitter feed, “a history of photographers who’ve already tracked the Transit of Venus.”

Lost & Found: 3.11 Photographs from Tohoku

Lost & Found: 3.11 exhibition at Hiroshi Watanabe Studio in Los Angeles (c) Lost & Found Project

This month of March brought the passing of the one-year anniversary of the devastating tsunami which hit the coast of Japan in 2011, laying waste much of the region, in some cases washing away entire villages and causing upwards of 20,000 deaths. Since the disaster, relief efforts came in a variety of forms, but one which humanizes the numerical abstraction of the death toll stuck out in particular.

In the current Aperture magazine issue 206, photography critic and independent curator Mariko Takeuchi writes:

In the cities, towns, and village affected by the disaster, a vast number of personal photographs were salvaged, pulled from underneath rubble and mud by all sorts of people. They were discolored by saltwater and covered with dirt; some were misshapen or even emitted foul odors. With very few exceptions, it was impossible to identify the people who had made the photographs, their subjects, or their owners—if indeed they were still alive.

What began as a small community effort has turned into the Memory Salvage Project, a volunteer organization that has to date recovered and begun restoring 750,000 lost family photographs.

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“Restoration is not just a matter of infrastructure,” Professor Kuniomi Shibata, head of the Memory Salvage Project, says in a video for Discovery Channel, “There are other important things.”

Snapshots were cleaned, numbered and digitized one by one with the help of volunteers who came from all over Japan. At least 20,000 photographs, and 13,000 photo albums have been returned to their owners. Several thousand other images abstracted by natural disaster have been assembled into an evocative and visually stunning traveling exhibition which has been on view in Tokyo and Los Angeles, and is now coming to New York.

Photographer Munemasa Takahashi, one of the leaders of the project tells New Yorker’s Photobooth why the images on view are so powerful:

After the disaster occurred, the first thing the people who lost their loved ones and houses came to look for was their photographs… Only humans take moments to look back at their pasts, and I believe photographs play a big part in that. This exhibit makes us think of what we have lost, and what we still have to remember about our past.

Lost & Found: 3.11 Photographs from Tohoku will be on view at Aperture Monday, April 2, 2012 – Friday, April 27, 2012.

Aperture Gallery and Bookstore
547 W. 27th Street, 4th Floor
New York, NY 10001
(212) 505-5555

Photo talk and show – Photography and Death with Andre Penteado and Joachim Froese in conversation with Sue Steward

“After his suicide I felt very guilty and lonely. A sense of failure and a feeling that I could have done something to prevent what happened overtook me. I felt a lot of anger towards him as well. I couldn’t believe what he had done to himself and to all of us who loved him so much.” Andre Penteado speaking about his dad’s suicide.

© Andre Penteado, Dad's Hangers

If you are south London way tonight, then why not head over to Photofusion for a talk Photography & Death starting at 18.30. Independent curator and journalist Sue Steward will be in conversation with Andre Penteado and Joachim Froese The talk tonight costs £5 (£3.50 members and students).

The exhibition brings together two bodies of work, Joachim Froese, Archive and Andre Penteado’s, Dad’s Suicide, (his father took his life in 2007) both of which are concerned with the process following the death of a parent. “Taking different approaches to a very sensitive subject, the making of the projects was a type of therapy for the photographers as they dealt with the sense of loss and grief.” Check out the talk tonight, I’ll be there too, and if you can’t make the talk the exhibition runs until 18 November.

Filed under: Artist Talks, Photographers, Photography & Philosophy, Photography Shows, Visual Artists Tagged: Andre Penteado, Archive, Dad’s Suicide, Joachim Froese, london, Photofusion, Photography & Death, Sue Steward

The Role of Women in Photography at SVA


Mermaid swimming away, Weeki Wachee, 2003. © Lisa Kereszi

The Role of Women in Photography: Are We There Yet?
Thursday, September 22, 2011
6:30 pm

School of Visual Arts
209 East 23 Street
3rd floor amphitheater
New York, NY

Free with a valid college ID, $10 for general public

Elisabeth Biondi, former visuals editor at The New Yorker and currently an independent curator, will be moderating a discussion panel on the current role of women in photography at SVA. The panel includes photography critic and Aperture magazine contributing editor Vince Aletti, Aperture contributing writer Lyle Rexer (whose book The Edge of Vision was published by Aperture), as well as photographers Martine Fougeron, Lisa Kereszi, and Sarah Silver. The event is being presented by SVA’s MFA Photography, Video, and Related Media Department, in partnership with Professional Women Photographers.

Go here! Do This!


1. Foam Magazine’s annual Talent Call is now open. “We are looking for the world’s next photography talent. We invite new talents to submit their work and a selection will be published in Foam Magazine’s 2011 Talent issue.” (via Foam)

2. Get BACK into the holiday spirit and help our talented friends over at Reference Gallery.

3. Don’t miss FINISHED: The LAST Show @ the Showpaper Gallery this Thursday, January 6th from 6-10pm. featuring work by Chad Muthard, Dena Yago, David Horvitz, Grant Willing, Jamisen Ogg, Jesse Hlebo, Kate Steciw, Lucas Blalock, Lucky Dragons, Pierre Le Hors, Ryan Foerster and Tuomas Korpijaakko.

4. If you are out and about in Brooklyn, stop by F.L.O.A.T Gallery and pick up some great photography books!

5. Silver Eye Center for Photography in Pittsburgh has announced its first Member’s Exhibition, titled “Future Forward,” to be juried by Darren Ching of Klomp Ching Gallery in Brooklyn, New York. Deadline January, 17th.

6. The Magenta Foundation has extended its submission deadline for it’s annual Flash Forward Competition to January 10th!

7. Waterfall Magazine is now accepting submissions to their next issue.

8. Next week, Mixed Greens is pleased to present Tuesday, our first exhibition organized by independent curator Amani Olu. The show features work by Conor Backman, Joy Drury Cox, Jon Feinstein, Van Hanos, Heather Rasmussen, Peter Segerstrom, Breanne Trammell, and Jennifer Marman & Daniel Borins and opens next Thursday  January, 13th.

9. Artists Wanted is kicking off the new year with Artists Wanted : A Year in Review, an international open call looking for dynamic, innovative and compelling artwork to present during Armory Week in New York City, scheduled to take place March 2011. One selected artist will receive a feature spot at SCOPE Art Show in New York City during Armory Week 2011, where the world’s artists, collectors, buyers, gallerists, critics, curators and art-enthusiasts will gather.  The selected artist will also receive a $10,000 prize, which includes a $5,000 cash grant to produce new work to showcase at the SCOPE show. Deadline is Friday January 28.

10. Invest some time in personal/artistic growth and learn how to make one of THESE.

Grange Prize 2010 Panel Discussion (Audio)

The nominees for this year’s Grange Prize engage in a lively conversation about the current state of contemporary photography.

Moderated by Dr. Kenneth Montague, Independent Curator and Collector. affordable website design . http://www.outsourcing-cheap.com . Featuring artists Josh Brand, Moyra Davey, Leslie Hewitt and Kristan Horton.

Recorded: September 22, 2010 @ Jackman Hall, Art Gallery of Ontario
Duration: 1:10:29

Click to play:

Download 96 MB MP3