Tag Archives: In The News

A Photo Student Update

Shsssssshhhhh aphotostudent.com is sleeping.

But you can find me at The New Yorker’s Photo Booth or hanging out at http://jamespomerantz.tumblr.com

 

 

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Marcus Bleasdale at Anastasia Gallery in NY Sept 7 to Oct 21 2011. Reception Sept 27th

Anastasia Gallery
166 Orchard Street
New York, NY 10002
Hours: Tues – Sun 11am – 7pm

Artist Reception is on September 27th.

Proceeds are being donated to St Kizito Orphanage in DR Congo.


However painful it may be for us delicate souls, and however intractable the Congo’s ills may appear, and however drained of compassion we may feel in the face of Darfur and other hells, we must never turn away our gaze. Indeed, we have a moral duty to look, which is what these images are telling us. To observe pain only through the prisms of the boardroom and the computer screen is to sever the vital artery between compassion and action.

The continuing human tragedy of Congo is not a statistic. It is a continuing human tragedy. It is fourteen hundred and fifty tragedies every day. It is countless more than that if you include the orphaned, the bereaved, the widowed, and all the ripples of truncated lives that spread from a single death. It is you and me and our children and our parents, if we had had the bad luck to be born into the world this work portrays.

But Congo has one secret that is hard to pass on if you haven’t learned it at first hand. Look carefully and you will find it in these images: a gaiety of spirit and a love of life that, even in the worst of times, leave the pampered Westerner moved and humbled beyond words.

John le Carré

 

 

Marcus Bleasdale is one of the world’s leading documentary photographers. He increasingly uses his work to influence decision makers and policy makers around the world.

His work on human rights and conflict have been shown at the U.S. Senate, The United Nations and the Houses of Parliament in the UK. Bleasdale’s work also appears in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The Sunday Times Magazine, The Telegraph Magazine, Stern, Le Monde, TIME Magazine, Newsweek and National Geographic.

 

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Rawiya Photo Collective

 

Rawiya is a photography collective founded by five female photographers from across the Middle East.

Rawiya presents an insider’s view of a region in flux balancing its contradictions while reflecting on social and political issues and stereotypes.

As a collective, Rawiya’s photographers respect the human dignity of the stories they tell, pooling resources and vision to produce in-depth photo-essays and long-term projects.

Rawiya, meaning “she who tells a story”, brings together the experiences and photographic styles of Tamara Abdul Hadi, Laura Boushnak, Tanya Habjouwa, Dalia Khamissy and Newsha Tavakolian.

 

Visit Rawiya Photo Collective

Rawiya on Facebook

Or click on a photo below to see that photographer’s website:

Tamara Abdul Hadi
Laura Bousnak
Tanya Habjouqa
Dalia Khamissy
Newsha Tavakolian

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Photographs of Agony – John Berger

The possible contradictions of the war photograph now become apparent. It is generally assumed that its purpose is to awaken concern. The most extreme examples – as in McCullin’s work – show moments of agony in order to extort maximum concern. Such moments, whether photographed or not, are discontinuous with all other moments. They exist by themselves. But the reader who has been arrested by the photograph may tend to feel this discontinuity as his own personal moral inadequacy…

The US Marine Counteroffensive, Day Nine. Don McCullin

Read the rest of Berger’s “Photographs of Agony” here, along with a few other chapters from About Looking which you should buy if you don’t already own.

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“Aesthetics have no place in photographing famine” – A David Campbell and Jon Levy Webinar

From David Campbell and Jon Levy

“Aesthetics have no place in photographing famine” webinar with David Campbell and Jon Levy from OPEN-i (Open Photojournalism Edu.

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Submissions for Aphotostudent are Always Welcome

If you’re a photographer with a new body of work to show or if you’re a photography fan who has a new photo crush, you’re always welcome to submit it for posting on Aphotostudent. The majority of the posts on here for the past two years have showcased the work of world-renowned photographers. I’d like to devote more time to showcasing new work from emerging artists, but I need your help to do it.

Photo For The Week: Yamaguchi-san Peeling Chestnuts, 2008. James Luckett

Ways to reach me:

1: Feel free to email me at [email protected] but please write “aphotostudent submission” or something similar in the subject line so I don’t confuse it with the many requests for help I receive from Nigerian Royalty with millions of dollars stuck in limbo.

Please include a little bit about yourself and the body of work in the email. A bit of context always helps.

or

2: Head over to my Facebook page and post a comment on the most recent call for work.

Pretty simple!

Thank you in advance for any submissions you send. And, my apologies if I don’t reply to your submission right away. Sometimes emails stack up. It’s nothing personal.

I look forward to seeing lots of amazing work! – James Pomerantz

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War Images Not Included in World War II: The American Home Front in Color (The Atlantic)

The Atlantic has a great selection of color photos of the United States during World War II. The photos were shot by Alfred Palmer and Howard Hollem for the Office of War Information – an agency created by Franklin Roosevelt. The Office of War Information which existed from June 1942 to September 1945 “coordinated the release of war news for domestic use, and, using posters and radio broadcasts, worked to promote patriotism, warned about foreign spies and attempted to recruit women into war work. The office also established an overseas branch which launched a large scale information and propaganda campaign abroad.”(Office of War Information at Wikipedia)

Here are some photos I thoroughly enjoyed  from The Library of Congress Collection not in The Atlantic edit:

J.D. Estes at the Naval Air Base, Corpus Christi, Texas. August 1942. Howard Hollem/OWI/LOC
Electric phosphate smelting furnace used to make elemental phosphorus in a TVA chemical plant in the vicinity of Muscle Shoals, Alabama. June 1942. Alfred Palmer/OWI/LOC
Manufacture of self-sealing gas tanks, Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co., Akron, Ohio. December 1941. Alfred Palmer/OWI/LOC
M-3 tank and crew using small arms, Ft. Knox, Ky. June 1942. Alfred Palmer/OWI/LOC
Women workers employed as wipers in the roundhouse having lunch in their rest room, C. & N.W. R.R., Clinton, Iowa. April 1943. Jack Delano/OWI/LOC
A carpenter at the TVA's new Douglas dam on the French Broad River, Tenn. This dam will be 161 feet high and 1,682 feet ong, with a 31,600-acre reservoir area extending 43 miles upstream. With a useful storage capacity of approximately 1,330,000 acre-feet, this reservoir will make possible the addition of nearly 100,000 kw. of continuous power to the TVA system in dry years and almost 170,000 kw. in the average year. June 1942. Alfred T. Palmer/OWI/LOC
Students at Washington High School at class, training for specific contributions to the war effort, Los Angeles, Calif. September 1942. Alfred T. Palmer/OWI/LOC
Operating a hand drill at Vultee-Nashville, woman is working on a "Vengeance" dive bomber, Tennessee. February 1943. Alfred T Palmer/OWI/LOC
Lucile Mazurek, age 29, ex-housewife, husband going into the service. Working on black-out lamps to be used on the gasoline trailers in the Air Force, Heil and Co., Milwaukee, Wisconsin. February 1943. Howard Hollem/OWI/LOC
Camouflage class in New York University, where men and women are preparing for jobs in the Army or in industry, New York, N.Y. They make models from aerial photographs, re-photograph them, then work out a camouflage scheme and make a final photograph. March 1943. Marjory Collins/OWI/LOC

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