Tag Archives: Images

David Soffa, Untitled

David Soffa, Untitled

David Soffa

Untitled,
Malvern, Pennsylvania, 2012
From the Centralia series
Website – DavidSoffa.com

David Soffa (b. 1987) was awarded a fellowship to Yale University Summer School of Art in 2009. He received a BA in Photography from Bard College in 2010. Primarily a landscape photographer, his images investigate the uncanny in everyday situations. Soffa’s photographs have been exhibited nationally in venues such as the Garrison Art Center and the Brooklyn Waterfront Artists Coalition. His work can also be found in the 2013 competition issue of The Photo Review and an upcoming installment of Dwell Magazine. He currently lives and works in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

George Holroyd, Untitled

George Holroyd, Untitled

George Holroyd

Untitled,
Milan, Italy, 2012
Website – GeorgeHolroyd.com

George Holroyd was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. When he was a child, George's family relocated often, transporting him to a variety of cities and towns throughout the eastern half of the United States. From an early age, he developed a sense of being a visitor to these new places, rather than a resident. That feeling of transience stayed with him and he has traveled extensively throughout his adult life, including to Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. He now lives in Paris with his wife, Sarah. His current project, And I, presents a diaristic set of images, made in collaboration with the artist's most faithful companion, a progressive neurological disorder known as Essential Tremor.

Chris Dorley-Brown, SunUp 2010

Chris Dorley-Brown, SunUp 2010

Chris Dorley-Brown

SunUp 2010,
London, 2012
From the The Fogs series
Website – Modrex.com

Chris Dorley-Brown grew up on the south coast of England but has lived and worked in the east end of London for the last thirty years. His influences are shaped by personal memory and those of others. The east end and its ever-increasing diaspora — with its tradition of radicalism, experimentation and innovation — are crucial to his work. Immigration, integration, conflict and movement are all studied in his images. In addition to his photographic archive production, since 1993 he has been collaborating with artists, filmmakers, curators, performers and writers producing feature film, short film, radio, publications and exhibitions. He lives and works in London.

Pictures of the Week: December 7 – December 14

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From the elementary school shooting in Connecticutand continued protests in Egypt to Syrian refugees in Turkey and the Pope’s first tweet, TIME presents the best images of the week.

Best photobooks of 2012: Chris McCaw’s "Sunburn" (one of 10)

mccaw-sunburn_12.jpg

From the book, Sunburn, by Chris McCaw.
Sunburned GSP#576 (Annular Eclipse, Nevada), 2012.
Unique gelatin silver paper negative. 20 x 24 inches.

Chris McCaws new (and first) monograph, Sunburn, is perhaps my favorite photobook of 2012. It is generous in size, elegantly designed, beautifully printed and the images are truly awe-inspiring. squido lense .

See and read more.

Romka magazine: a collective photo-album

Romka magazine, Issue #7

I wrote about Romka magazine over on the eyecurious Tumblr some time ago, but I will confess to never having picked up a paper copy before, so the latest issue (#7) is the first I have been able to flick through. The conceit is a simple one, “favorite pictures and the stories that lie behind them” by pros and amateurs alike. No book reviews, no interviews, no ads… no excess fat. The result is a kind of crowd-sourced collective photo-album, which makes it sound terrible when it is really quite good. Romka simply does what it says on the tin: it presents a series of single images by photographers (that might be Roger Ballen or it might be Sachi “the builder who lives in a pink house in New Orleans”), each accompanied by a short text explaining what that image means to them. It is a very simple recipe, and like many simple recipes it is hard to get right, but when it works it is rather delicious. Although it follows a fairly strict formula it doesn’t feel formulaic because of its democratic, all-inclusive approach to images and because it helps to reveal some of the myriad reasons why photographs matter so much to people. This simple formula also makes it refreshingly different to most other photography magazines out there.

I have done a lot of wondering (to myself and sometimes out loud) about whether the photo album has become irrelevant today given the changes in the way that we make and look at photographs… Romka makes me think that there is life in it yet.

Romka magazine, Issue #7

Romka magazine, Issue #7

Romka magazine, Issue #7, November 2012, edition of 1,500.

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Robert Rutoed: Right Time Right Place

The photographs of Robert Rutoed appeared on my visual radar
several years ago when I was introduced to his project, Less is More. The images made an impression that kept his name and photographs
in the forefront of my mental Rolodex – not an easy feat, as I look at a lot of
images on a daily basis. 
Robert is part of that wonderful European street shooter legacy that is so important in a world where technology keeps our heads down, where cell phones remove us from truly being engaged with each other.  And it’s this heads-down mentality that disassociates our connections with a world rich with small dramas. We need Robert’s photographs to make us realize what we are missing, and allow the levity of his work to not only see ourselves with amusement, but to simply, see ourselves.

What Robert brings to the contemporary photographic dialogue
is that intangible ability to see the world with a skewed lens – a lens that is
compassionate and at the same time, unkind. It is a lens that is the stuff of
operas and nightmares, comedies and slapstick. Robert finds that split second
of humor or truth telling and that instant of social documentation or absurdity
that makes us not only laugh at ourselves, but also laugh and feel embarrassed
all at the same time.  Or should I
say, at The Right Time.
Robert has a new book, Right Time Right Place, that releases this week, and I have the privilege of writing the foreword to this publication.
Robert  was born in Vienna and is a photographer and filmmaker. He created numerous
short feature films with screenings worldwide and his photographic work has been exhibited throughout Europe, the United States and Asia. Robert was recently the winner of the
New York Photo Award 2012 in the category Fine Art. His books included: Less Is More
(2009), grayscales, early b&w photographs (2010), Right Time Right
Place
(2012).
Right Time Right Place
Being at the right place at the right time is usually associated with
happiness and success. But what happens when we are at the right place
at the wrong time? Do we even know that this is the right place? And
what if it turns out that it is the wrong place after all? But the right
time!” – Whoever loses his orientation over this thought will get a
feeling for Robert Rutöd’s latest pictures. The Vienna-born photographer
wandered for five years through Europe and has proven to be a keen
observer with an often tragicomic view: The blind man who finds
orientation by putting his stick in a tram track, the helpless swan that
finds itself frozen to the vast stretch of ice, or the amputee operator
of a shooting range set up in a ruined building. It gets macabre with
the portraits of the Pope, Hitler and Mussolini decorating the labels of
wine bottles.