Tag Archives: Human Nature

Tearsheet of The Day | Narciso Contreras from Aleppo in Time

Most of the world’s media attention has been on Gaza for the week or so, but the fighting in Syria hasn’t been any quieter. Just yesterday we saw news reports of airstrikes by Syrian government damaging a hospital in Aleppo which killed 15 people and left as many as 40 missing.

Time magazine (Int’l ed.) ran an article about the Syria’s largest city in their last weekend’s issue. Opens with a striking photo by Narciso Contreras who has been filing photos from Aleppo for the Associated Press and Polaris.

pp. SEO Experts search engine marketing . 26-27. Time (Int’l ed.). November 26, 2012 issue.
Photo Narciso Contreras
Text on the spread: Cat and Mouse. Both regime and rebels have snipers at the ready. Rebel fighters are reflected in a mirror as they watch for enemies

Narciso Contrerasis a photojournalist born in Mexico City, whose work focuses on ‘feature stories, reportage and documentary based on religious communities, human nature and conflicts.’

Guy Tremblay

We are judgemental people. It’s human nature to assume things, to form opinions about the people we don’t know. Canadian photographer, Guy Tremblay, is looking at this phenomenon with his series, Ton visage me dit quelque chose (Your face tells (reveals) me something) . Revisiting an idea he had in 2003, he asked social workers that deal with the homeless and the addicted, to bring one of their “clients” to the shoot. It is up to the viewer to decide which one is the social worker, and which one is the client.

Marie-Michèle

Guy has been involved with photography for almost thirty years, not only in creating work, but he organized the Mois de la Photo à St-Camille for the past seven years. He also teaches photography to teenagers on a volunteer basis in collaboration with different organizations. He has received grants from the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Quebec, in addition to many solo and group exhibitions. His photographs are held in public and private collections in Canada, the United States, Europe and Asia.

In Ton visage me dit quelque chose, all the social workers from Sherbrooke, PQ were photographed. I asked them to bring along one of their clients for the photo shooting. One of the goals of that series was to demystify the reality of the street, to get away from the usual cliché. I wanted to put the subject in a neutral context without the reference to the street. This way, it became pretty hard to categorize them. I usually ask the people not to smile when I make their portrait. But this time I let them loose, I wanted to get true feeling not an artificial image. I wanted them to be themself with dignity and not to show them as miserable or with problems.

Annie

In 2003 I made a similar series « un trentième de seconde » (On third of a second). The former series was all made outside in a disaffected area ( An easy to find meeting point downtown Sherbrooke). For the new series, I decided to use a makeshift studio that was mounted for each meeting in the office of the street workers (Coalition Sherbrookoise pour le travail de rue) right downtown. By using this setup, I also wanted to pay a tribute to Irving Penn who was a major inspiration to me.

Daniel

All the portraits were made with a medium format camera and they are silver gelatine prints, selenium toned to respect Mr. Penn’s spirit. Few years ago, Mr. Penn personally encouraged me to continue in that direction.

Émily, Jessica and Sharlie

Erick

Geneviève

Mathieu and Akiam

Michaël

Michel M.

Michel P.

Milène

Rémi

Roch-Henri

Sophie

Sylvain

Human nature: a flood of last-minute entries for Awards

We’ve been receiving a flurry of anxious, worried messages via email from people who are uploading their photographs and multimedia for the Lens Culture International Exposure Awards 2011. They are worried because the upload system is unusually slow. Seems like our online system is experiencing a bit of overload, and that is creating unnecessary stress for a lot of talented people. Absolutely, the upload system is slower than usual today — especially for you multimedia artists with large files.

Sorry. But please don’t worry. handyman matters .

If you REGISTER and BEGIN you submission before 11:59 PM Pacific time today (September 17), you will be able to complete your submission for an additional 24 hours beyond the deadline, and your work will be included in the competition. BUT, you must register and begin the process before 11:59 PM Pacific time, to be able to continue beyond the deadline for the additional 24 hours.

Hope that helps. Don’t worry. Be happy. Visualize worldwide appreciation for your hard-earned work and art. portland or . 🙂

There are lots and lots of people out there who would LOVE to discover you and your work (including all of us at Lens Culture).

Gabriel Spitzer to Moderate Discussion at the MoCP about the Links Between Humans and Non-Human Primates

cleverapes.jpg
Alison Ruttan, Mullet, 2006; Courtesy of the artist

Gabriel Spitzer, host of WBEZ Chicago’s popular program Clever Apes, will moderate a conversation about evolution and links between humans and their primate ancestors at the MoCP at 6 p.m. on Thursday, August 25.

The conversation is being held in conjunction with the museum’s current show, Our Origins, which uses a combination of scientific analysis and artistic expression to answer questions about human nature and evolution as well as our place within the cosmos.

Spitzer, who covers science, health and the environment for WBEZ Chicago, will moderate the discussion between artist Alison Ruttan, whose work explores the links between humans and primates, and Dr. Laurie Santos, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Yale University.

Santos’ research focuses on the ability of non-human primates to possess precursors to human thought, such as how to use reason to make decisions. Just last summer, Santos presented some of her finding in a TED Talk about how primates mimic human’s common economic decisions.

Admission to the event is free and open to the public. For more details, take a look at the exhibitions page on our website or keep posted via Facebook.

Gabriel Spitzer to Moderate Discussion at the MoCP about the Links Between Humans and Non-Human Primates

cleverapes.jpg
Alison Ruttan, Mullet, 2006; Courtesy of the artist

Gabriel Spitzer, host of WBEZ Chicago’s popular program Clever Apes, will moderate a conversation about evolution and links between humans and their primate ancestors at the MoCP at 6 p.m. on Thursday, August 25.

The conversation is being held in conjunction with the museum’s current show, Our Origins, which uses a combination of scientific analysis and artistic expression to answer questions about human nature and evolution as well as our place within the cosmos.

Spitzer, who covers science, health and the environment for WBEZ Chicago, will moderate the discussion between artist Alison Ruttan, whose work explores the links between humans and primates, and Dr. Laurie Santos, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at Yale University.

Santos’ research focuses on the ability of non-human primates to possess precursors to human thought, such as how to use reason to make decisions. Just last summer, Santos presented some of her finding in a TED Talk about how primates mimic human’s common economic decisions.

Admission to the event is free and open to the public. For more details, take a look at the exhibitions page on our website or keep posted via Facebook.

Photographer #303: Sabine Delcour

Sabine Delcour, 1968, France, is a landscape photographer working and living in Paris. With a large-scale camera she makes very clear and sharp photographs. In her series Thoroughfares she photographs marginal areas where nature has to make compromises, places where the landscape can be seen as a story of “human nature”. In 2006 she realeased the book Autour de Nous (Around Us), a project that came to life while she was in Japan. She photographed unfinished houses and interviewed the local people creating a soundtrack to her work. The stories and destinies of these people combined with the images of houses under construction create a link and a relationship. The following images come from the series Itsas LurrakThoroughfares and Arounds Us.


Website: www.sabinedelcour.com