Tag Archives: Human Interaction

Altered Landscapes at the Nevada Museum of Art


from Site Specific_New York City O7. © Olivo Barbieri

The Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment

Exhibition on view:
September 24, 2011-January 15, 2012

Nevada Museum of Art:
160 West Liberty Street
Reno, NV
(775) 329-3333

The Altered Landscape: Photographs of a Changing Environment is the current photography exhibition at the Nevada Museum of Art. The exhibit features the museum’s signature photography collection which examines human interaction with the environment. The exhibit, and its accompanying deluxe volume book, showcase the museum’s immense and diverse collection of landscape photography. Altered Landscape features the work of many Aperture-published photographers including founding member Ansel Adams, Robert Adams, featured in Aperture issues 197, 180 and the books Summer Nights and The New West; Olivo Barbieri, featured in Photo Art: Photography in the 21st Century; Marilyn Bridges, whose print Journey, Monument Valley, Arizona/Utah is available from Aperture; William Christenberry, featured in issue 183 and whose Aperture books includes Kodachromes; William Eggleston, featured in issue 196; Lee Friedlander, featured in The New York Times Magazine Photographs and issue 188; Richard Misrach, featured in issues 193 and 174 and whose Aperture titles includes Destroy This Memory; Edward Weston, whose books include Nudes and The Flame of Recognition; and many more.

Dominic Bell



All images © Dominic Bell

I recently received these intriguing and ethereal images from Dominic Bell as part of his ongoing Broken Waves project. A recent photography graduate of the University of the Arts Bournemouth, Bell’s work explores the state of our relationship with nature.

Broken Wave, seeks to represent the objectification of nature through the investigation of current notions surrounding the contemporary seascape. The work of Broken Wave strives to exemplify the possibilities of the relationship between the sculptural object and the photographic image through an investigation into the nature of time and photography. The photographs within Broken Wave are depicted with the aim of superseding the original objects and making the temporality of the sculptural work be replaced by aspects of timelessness. This work is part of an ongoing investigation in to human interaction with landscape and our incessant desire for ‘objects’. By collecting samples of wave water and freezing them, the work plays on the themes of human intervention and destruction.”

It’s still under construction, but if you’re itching for more you can take a look at Bell’s work on his website.

Seth Price

A few issues ago, Blindspot featured Seth Price‘s series of laser-cut silhouettes. Gleaned from generic google image searches, these pieces recall Sherrie Levine’s series of silhouette collages of American presidents (example here). The text below was taken from a press release for Price’s recent exhibition at Friedrich Petzel:

1. A computer search for the most basic terms: ‘eating’, ‘drinking’, ‘writing’, ‘touching’, ‘mother,’ etc. The result might be a digital image, a “jpeg”, for example. The image depicts human interaction: people kissing, someone being fed, a person laying a hand on another’s shoulder. The situation is familiar, but not necessarily clear. At one point this was a photograph, now shrunken, squeezed through the eye of the needle, its information digitally compressed for easy circulation and distribution. It appears as a tiny, lapidary screen image, though we know that if enlarged it will slip away, its edges decaying as the effects of compression become evident.

2. This image is not used, in favor of the area around the image, the negative space, excess, that which lies between the figures.

3. Then, an industrial process: massive enlargement, computer-controlled cutting, woods, plastics, metal. A design process, the fabrication of a “look and feel” that had not previously existed.


© Seth Price


© Seth Price


© Seth Price


© Seth Price


© Seth Price

Seth Price

A few issues ago, Blindspot featured Seth Price‘s series of laser-cut silhouettes. Gleaned from generic google image searches, these pieces recall Sherrie Levine’s series of silhouette collages of American presidents (example here). The text below was taken from a press release for Price’s recent exhibition at Friedrich Petzel:

1. A computer search for the most basic terms: ‘eating’, ‘drinking’, ‘writing’, ‘touching’, ‘mother,’ etc. The result might be a digital image, a “jpeg”, for example. The image depicts human interaction: people kissing, someone being fed, a person laying a hand on another’s shoulder. The situation is familiar, but not necessarily clear. At one point this was a photograph, now shrunken, squeezed through the eye of the needle, its information digitally compressed for easy circulation and distribution. It appears as a tiny, lapidary screen image, though we know that if enlarged it will slip away, its edges decaying as the effects of compression become evident.

2. This image is not used, in favor of the area around the image, the negative space, excess, that which lies between the figures.

3. Then, an industrial process: massive enlargement, computer-controlled cutting, woods, plastics, metal. A design process, the fabrication of a “look and feel” that had not previously existed.


© Seth Price


© Seth Price


© Seth Price


© Seth Price


© Seth Price