Tag Archives: Houston Center

Aaron Schuman, Untitled

Aaron Schuman, Untitled

Aaron Schuman

Untitled,
Somerset, England, 2012
From the Summer Set series
Website – AaronSchuman.com

Aaron Schuman is an American photographer, editor, writer and curator based in the United Kingdom. His photographic work is exhibited internationally, and he regularly contributes photography, articles, essays and interviews to a wide-range of publications, including Aperture, Foam Magazine, Photoworks, ArtReview, Modern Painters, Hotshoe International, British Journal of Photography, and more; he has also published writings in a number of recently released books, including Pieter Hugo: This Must Be the Place (Prestel, 2012), Photographs Not Taken (Daylight, 2012), and Hijacked 3 (Big City Press, 2012). In 2010, Schuman curated Whatever Was Splendid: New American Photographs, a principal exhibitions at the 2010 Fotofest Biennial (Houston, USA); in 2011 he curated Other I: Alec Soth, Wassink Lundgren, Viviane Sassen at Hotshoe Gallery (London, UK); and he is in the midst of curating In Appropriation for the Houston Center of Photography, opening in September 2012. Schuman is a Senior Lecturer in Photography at the University of Brighton and the Arts University College at Bournemouth. He is also the founder, director and editor of the online photography journal, SeeSaw Magazine.
 

Pelle Cass

I am a long time fan of Pelle Cass’ work.  His photographs are inventive, conceptual, and manage to reinterpret what is right in front of us by using multiple images to create new realities.  Pelle just opened a show at Gallery Kayafas of his new project, Strangers.  These portraits are made up of numerous close-up photographs, when combined, reveal minutely observed facts add up to something new and strange. The exhibition runs through November 24th, 2012.

Pelle has had solo shows in the Boston area at Gallery Kayafas, Stux Gallery, the Griffin Museum of Photography, the Photographic Resource Center at Boston University, and Harvard’s Fogg Museum print room. He has also had solo shows at the Frank Marino Gallery, NYC and the Houston Center for Photography in Texas. His work is owned by the Fogg Art Museum, the Addison Gallery of American Art, the Polaroid Collection, the DeCordova Museum, Lehigh University Art Galleries, the Peabody Essex Museum, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. He was Winner: Top 50, Critical Mass, Photolucida, Portland, OR, in 2008 and 2009, and was awarded Yaddo Fellowships (Saratoga Springs, NY) in 2010 and 2012. He was born in Brooklyn, NY, and lives in Brookline, Massachusetts.

Two of my favorite series are Selected People and Pins.  In Selected People, Pelle “orders the world and exaggerates its chaos.” Taking dozens of photographs of the same location, he selects what color palette or point of view he wishes to present. With Pins, Pelle rephotographs images from Architectural Digest and covers them with pins to create a new way of looking at space.


image from Selected People 

image from Pins

Strangers:
I think of these pictures as non-portraits. They say nothing of the personality or psychology of the people who sat for them, even though they are very detailed and closely observed. So why bother? At first, I was simply curious about what a portrait is. I thought it might be revealing to remove the variables of personality and identity from the portrait. 

 The sitter is basically unrecognizable, even though each picture is nothing but a set of photographic facts about that person. This emptying of identity happens when, after taking dozens of extreme close-ups of a particular person’s face, I blend the fragments into a new face. The shiny noses, wrinkled foreheads, and swirls of hair, take on a strange intensity when reassembled. 

 My aim is to use extreme photographic precision in a spontaneous, almost messily expressionistic way, to discover, perhaps, a whole new set of human emotions housed in a new anatomy, but also to discover something about the nature of the photographic portrait.


Andrew Spear

With gun control a heated topic in the upcoming election and horrific events in Colorado recently, the idea that someone would want to own a machine gun still is beyond my comprehension. Photographer, Andrew Spear is exploring that phenomenon in his on-going project, Knob Creek.

Based in Columbus, Ohio, Andrew works a freelance photographer, in addition to creating documentary and fine art work. Often choosing to pursue personal projects near home, much of his work reflects his surroundings as he attempts to understand both the communities he lives in and the relationships he builds with others.  His work has been exhibited at the Houston Center for Photography in Houston, Texas, the Annenberg Space for Photography in New York City, and was presented at LOOKBetween in Charlottesville, VA. His clients include Esquire, TIME, Mother Jones, The Washington Post Magazine, Le Monde’s M Magazine, The New York Times, Smithsonian, US News and World Report and The Wall Street Journal amongst many others.

Knob Creek: Twice a year, thousands of gun enthusiasts descend upon the former Naval munitions testing ground outside of West Point, Kentucky to exercise their 2nd Amendment rights at the largest machine gun shoot in America. Used in the early 20th century, the property tested many of the large scale weapons used in World War I and II before being sold in 1963. Now, the Knob Creek Range is one of the last places in the country where privately-owned class III automatic weapons can legally be fired. This is an ongoing body of work.

Jason Reblando, Looking Over Fence

Jason Reblando, Looking Over Fence

Jason Reblando

Looking Over Fence,
Chicago, 2008
From the Lathrop Homes series
Website – JasonReblando.com

Jason Reblando is a photographer and artist based in Chicago. He received his MFA in Photography from Columbia College Chicago and a BA in Sociology from Boston College. His photographs have been published in the New York Times, Bloomberg Businessweek, Camera Austria, Nueva Luz, Bauwelt, and PDNedu. His work has been exhibited in the Singapore International Photo Festival, the Photographic Resource Center at Boston University, the Houston Center for Photography, the Light Factory in Charlotte, the Hyde Park Art Center in Chicago, and the Minnesota Center for Photography. His work is collected in the Museum of Contemporary Photography's Midwest Photographers Project, the Milwaukee Art Museum, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Aaron Schuman, Redwoods (4)

Aaron Schuman, Redwoods (4)

Aaron Schuman

Redwoods (4),
, 2011-12
From the Redwoods series
Website – AaronSchuman.com

Aaron Schuman is an American photographer, editor, writer and curator based in the United Kingdom. His photographic work is exhibited internationally, and he regularly contributes photography, articles, essays and interviews to a wide-range of publications, including Aperture, Foam Magazine, Photoworks, ArtReview, Modern Painters, Hotshoe International, British Journal of Photography, and more; he has also published writings in a number of recently released books, including Pieter Hugo: This Must Be the Place (Prestel, 2012), Photographs Not Taken (Daylight, 2012), and Hijacked 3 (Big City Press, 2012). In 2010, Schuman curated Whatever Was Splendid: New American Photographs, a principal exhibitions at the 2010 Fotofest Biennial (Houston, USA); in 2011 he curated Other I: Alec Soth, Wassink Lundgren, Viviane Sassen at Hotshoe Gallery (London, UK); and he is in the midst of curating In Appropriation for the Houston Center of Photography, opening in September 2012. Schuman is a Senior Lecturer in Photography at the University of Brighton and the Arts University College at Bournemouth. He is also the founder, director and editor of the online photography journal, SeeSaw Magazine.
 

Video: 34 Award-winning photographers & multimedia makers

A 22-minute presentation of the winners of the Lens Culture International Exposure Awards 2011 — some of the best in global photography and multimedia today.

The nine top winners and 25 honorable mention winners represent work from 14 countries – submitted by artists from 48 countries.

In 2011, the international jury of experts awarded prizes in three categories:

Photography Portfolio
Single Image
Multimedia

The winning entries cover a broad and diverse range of subject matter, stylistic approaches, and technical processes. Enjoy!

These award winners are currently being screened at film festivals and international arts venues around the world, including the SPE National Conference Film Festival in San Francisco; the Houston Center for Photography during FotoFest 2012; The Bilder Nordic series in Olso, Norway; the Voies Off Festival in Arles, France; the international photo festival in Tuscany, Italy: Cortona On The Move — and venues in Paris, London, New York, Brisbane and others to be announced.

Enter YOUR photographs and multimedia for the Lens Culture International Exposure Awards Awards 2012:
lensculture.com/awards. The competition is now open for new submissions!

Re runs: Edmund Clark

This post first ran in 2009…

The Houston Center for Photography recently opened an exhibition titled Prime Years. I was intrigued by this often under-exposed subject, as much of the work showcased in the fine art world spotlights a more youthful population. Curator Fernando Castor R. selected 13 photographers who are/were exploring the many aspects of aging. From the editorial to the personal, the work in Prime Years depicts centenarians, artists, relatives, and other individuals enjoying, enduring, and living their lives beyond the age of 60.

Edmund Clark is a well regarded British photographer with a reputation for “combining strong ideas with an ability to work in sensitive situations and with people on the margins of society.” He works as an editorial and a fine art photographer; his book, Still Killing Time, about long term incarceration, was a finalist at the NY Photo Awards and received an honorable mention at the IPA Awards. Edmund’s project, Centenarians, is featured at HCP.

Statement for Centenarians: These people were born before television was invented, before cars were mass marketed, before the Titanic was built, before the Russian Revolution or the First World War. They are all over 100 years old and the last of the pre-technological age. For some, Queen Victoria was still on the throne when they were born. A hundred years later the telegram marking their centenary came from her great, great granddaughter.






Another project, titled No Place to Go, takes a look at asylum seekers in Britain that flee persecution in one country only to experience discrimination in another.

Images from No Place to Go





Gay Block

I was introduced to the work of Houston photographer, Gay Block, by Frazier King from the Houston Center of Photography. Gay has been a portrait photographer for a good long while, and her site has many wonderful series worth exploring. I’m going to feature several in order to peak your interest. As a portrait photographer, Gay began in 1973 with portraits of her own affluent Jewish community in Houston and later expanded this study to include South Miami Beach and girls at summer camp. Her landmark work with writer Malka Drucker, RESCUERS: Portraits of Moral Courage in the Holocaust, both a book and traveling exhibit, has been seen in over fifty venues in the US and abroad, including the Museum of Modern Art, NY, in 1992.

A few of her terrific portraits:
In these first pictures, I became interested in the way families looked together. I had never noticed that family members sometimes assumed identical gestures. When this happened, I stopped the interview and asked them to stay that way so that I could photograph it. I almost never gave a direction about the way someone should look or sit, except that I usually asked them not to smile, explaining that a smile put on expressly for the camera would create a facade which might give a superficial quality to the picture.

“And I’ll say that I got a knot in my stomach when I realized that, well by golly, it has happened. A son of mine is engaged to a non-Jewish girl, and I didn’t like it. That was my immediate reaction. I didn’t like it, and I was a little surprised at my own reaction.”

I came to understand that children are simply short people….The first time I asked a child to go into his own bedroom for the picture, I realized later that I had done it because his room was his domain and the place he was most comfortable. He relaxed, he became himself, and began to collaborate with me. Children do not need to be coached not to smile; they do not yet have the adult’s involuntary response of smiling the minute they are in front of a camera.

Gay has focused some of her work on her mother. She created a book, Mother exPosed, in 2003 of images that were created over a 20 year period.

How do you like my new necklace?, 1997/2003

In 1981, Gay decided to photograph the girls at Camp Pinecliffe, and re-photographed them as women almost 25 years later.

 

Images from The Women the Girls are Now 1981-2006

Images from Underwear