Tag Archives: High Museum Of Art

Christopher Churchill, Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.

Christopher Churchill, Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.

Christopher Churchill

Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.,
Ponca City, Oklahoma, 2009
Website – ChristopherChurchill.com

Christopher Churchill (b. 1977) works as a fine art and commissioned photographer based in New England. His photographs are held in various permanent collections that include The Corcoran Gallery of Art, The Center for Creative Photography, The High Museum of Art, The J. Paul Getty Museum, MFA Boston, MFA Houston, The Museum of Contemporary Photography and The Smithsonian. His first monograph American Faith, was published in 2012 by Nazraeli Press and the Joy of Giving Something. In 2010 he was named to the Critical Mass top 50. He had had the good fortune of working with a variety of clients that include Budweiser, Businessweek, Esquire, Fast Co., Inc., GQ, Liberty Mutual, Newsweek, NYTimes Magazine, Stern, Time, Travel & Leisure, Salvation Army and PBS. He lives outside of Boston with his wife and two daughters.  

Christopher Churchill, Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.

Christopher Churchill, Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.

Christopher Churchill

Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.,
Ponca City, Oklahoma, 2009
Website – ChristopherChurchill.com

Christopher Churchill (b. 1977) works as a fine art and commissioned photographer based in New England. His photographs are held in various permanent collections that include The Corcoran Gallery of Art, The Center for Creative Photography, The High Museum of Art, The J. Paul Getty Museum, MFA Boston, MFA Houston, The Museum of Contemporary Photography and The Smithsonian. His first monograph American Faith, was published in 2012 by Nazraeli Press and the Joy of Giving Something. In 2010 he was named to the Critical Mass top 50. He had had the good fortune of working with a variety of clients that include Budweiser, Businessweek, Esquire, Fast Co., Inc., GQ, Liberty Mutual, Newsweek, NYTimes Magazine, Stern, Time, Travel & Leisure, Salvation Army and PBS. He lives outside of Boston with his wife and two daughters.  

Martin Parr: Picturing the American South

The High Museum of Art commissioned Martin Parr to document Atlanta as part of its Picturing the South project—a series of artist commissions that engage with the American South. Channeling his unparalleled ability to collate humor, wit, and curiosity into his heavily socio-cultural photographs, Parr captured the oddities and eccentricities of contemporary Americana.

British-born Parr, whose photography career spans over 30 years, is known for his provocative documentary style by using cultural criticism through an exaggerated and humorous light. His analysis of how we live is not simply satire, as Parr offers his audience an approach to seeing which acts not to denounce, but to highlight (both aesthetically and thematically) patterns between people, the things we consume and the milieus in which we live.

The outcome of the museum’s commission offers a vivid, comedic and touching perspective on the diversity that lies in Atlanta. Parr covers a large body of subject matter in his findings, which ranges from the high and low—juxtaposing images from a gallery opening to an oddly lengthy corn dog on a stick. Parr’s images offer insight which would only be found through the lens of a meticulous and curious outsider.

Beyond the exhibition at the High Museum of Art, Italian publisher Contrasto released a book, Up and Down Peachtree: Photographs of Atlantaand a documetary, Hot Spots: Martin Parr in the American South. The book, a meticulously edited and impeccably designed object in its own right, is printed without text beyond the book’s title and colophon—which, undeniably, is a testament to Parr’s talent for storytelling. The documentary is a 60-minute lens behind the lens where documentarian Neal Broffman followed Parr photographing around Atlanta. The documentary includes interviews with noted curators, writers, critics and photographers, and offers a look into at Parr’s real-life affable personality and interactions with his subjects. Below, Contrasto has given LightBox an exclusive clip on the documentary:

Martin Parr’s photographs are on view now through September 9, 2012, as part of Picturing the South: New Commissions from the High Museum of Art. Up and Down Peachtree and Hot Spots: Martin Parr in the American South are both available for purchase online.

Shane Lavalette: Musical Heritage in the New South

During his short but noteworthy career, Shane Lavalette has examined distinct regions of the world, illuminating their respective character without succumbing to powerful clichés. At the age of only 25, Lavalette has photographed the west coast of Ireland, a small town in northern India and his native New England. You won’t find any pubs, elephants or lush shots of fall foliage in these collections. Instead, Lavalette combines portraits of ordinary people with pointed images of each area’s commerce, culture and the immediate countryside to create a portrait of a place as it might be seen by a local, but through the eyes of a wandering explorer.

In 2010, the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, which for decades has been the leading art museum in the South, commissioned Lavalette to produce a new collection of photographs for their Picturing the South series. “Having grown up in the Northeast, it was primarily through traditional music–old time Blues, gospel, etc.–that I formed a relationship with the South,” Lavalette says of his project. “The region’s rich musical history became the natural entry point for my work.”

As in his previous projects, Lavalette steered clear of standard images of the American South: willows and oak trees wilting in the humid heat; cotton fields and mountain trails. Nor was Lavalette interested in shooting a documentary about Southern music today. Instead he turned to “the relationship between traditional music and the contemporary landscape through a more poetic lens.”

There are scenes of nature, but not the sweeping landscapes often seen in the South. Lavalette shot ripples on a pond, where the towering pines are only visible in the reflection on the water. There’s the graffiti-strewn interior of an old café, with a poster so covered in marker scribbles that it’s nearly unrecognizable. Lavalette shows the collision of modern life and nature in the form of an empty parking lot beside the rusted wall of a warehouse, where kudzu has begun to encroach upon the asphalt.

Music has always permeated the consciousness of the South. The home of blues, gospel, bluegrass and countless combinations of those styles, the South is a region rich with musical heritage, a perfect gateway into understanding the region’s history and its culture today. “Moved by the themes and stories past down in songs,” Lavalette says, “I let the music itself carry the pictures.”

Shane Lavalette is a New-York-based photographer. More of his work can be seen here. The exhibition Picturing the South is on view at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta from June 9 through Sept. 2, 2012.

Revisiting the South: Richard Misrach’s Cancer Alley

The Mississippi is, according to song, a river of black water and mud. But, over a 100-mile stretch between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, something else flows. The nearly 150 petrochemical plants along those banks mean that the region has one of the highest concentrations of industry in the United States. That cluster of facilities, and the resulting pollution and increased cancer rates, have earned the area the nickname “Cancer Alley.”

Richard Misrach first traveled to Cancer Alley in 1998, producing a series of images that were exhibited as part of a “Picturing the South” series at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta. “I’d never heard of this area,” Misrach recalls. “And when I finally saw the landscape, I was shocked. It was really extreme—the amount of industry along the river and the poor communities living there—I couldn’t believe it actually existed.”

In February, May and November of 2010, Misrach returned to the region, only to discover that little had changed. “It was impossible to tell if it’d gotten worse or better,” the photographer says. “It looks the same. It feels the same. The roads are still below par, and the schools are as well.” Misrach’s photographs from his latest trip—along with some of his 1998 originals—are again on display at the High Museum of Art, in an exhibition aptly titled “Revisiting the South: Richard Misrach’s Cancer Alley.” The photographs show a bleak, desolate region, and one in which factories and plants are almost always present in the background.

But Misrach says some of the most poignant aspects of the region couldn’t be captured by camera. “What’s not shown is the constant stirring sound; I’m amazed people can work,” he says. “And the smells, from the gasoline stench to the chemicals in the air. That’s what you can’t see.”

The exhibit Revisiting the South: Richard Misrach’s Cancer Alley is on view at the High Museum from June 2 through Oct. 7, 2012.

You can see Richard Misrach’s project on the 1991 Oakland-Berkeley fire here.

Ron Jude, Untitled

Ron Jude, Untitled

Ron Jude

Untitled,
, 1998/2012
From the Lick Creek Line series

Ron Jude was born in Los Angeles in 1965, grew up in the Pacific Northwest, and currently lives in upstate New York. His photographs have been exhibited at venues such as Gallery Luisotti (Santa Monica), the Photographers’ Gallery (London), the High Museum of Art (Atlanta), Proekt_Fabrika (Moscow) and Roth/Horowitz Gallery (New York), among others. His work is in numerous collections, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, George Eastman House, the New Orleans Museum of Art, and the Georgia Museum of Contemporary Art in Atlanta. Jude is the co-founder of A-Jump Books and the author of Alpine Star, Postcards, Other Nature and Emmett. His new book, Lick Creek Line, was recently published by MACK. He is represented by Gallery Luisotti in Santa Monica.

Shane Lavalette

The name Shane Lavalette first entered my consciousness when he created the innovative and stellar magazine, Lay Flat.  While still a student, Shane excited the photo world with his new approach to publishing. His mastery of all things visual continues to be evident with his new body of work, Picturing the South.  Born in Vermont, Shane received his BFA from Tufts University in partnership with the School of the Museum of Art, Boston. He has exhibited and published widely, and is the Associate Director of Light Work.

Shane was commissioned by the High Museum of Art in Atlanta to create new photographs about the South, along with Martin Parr and Kael Alford, for an exhibition that opens at the museum on June 9th and runs through September 2, 2012. The exhibition features a companion exhibition, Picturing New York, with 150 historical works by Lewis Hine, Berenice Abbott, Walker Evans, Harry Callahan, and Diane Arbus.
In order to generate funds to publish a book of this work, Shane has created a Kickstarter campaign with some wonderful bonus items including prints, books, and music.


In 2010 I was commissioned by the High Museum of Art in Atlanta to create a new body of photographs for their “Picturing the South” series, which includes past artists Sally Mann, Emmet Gowin, Richard Misrach, Dawoud Bey, Alex Webb and Alec Soth. I’m honored to be amongst these artists, and look forward to exhibiting new work with photographers Martin Parr and Kael Alford in June of 2012.
Images from Picturing the South
Having grown up in the Northeast, it was primarily through traditional music—old time, blues, gospel, etc.—that I had formed a relationship with the South. With that in mind, the region’s rich musical history became the natural entry point for my work. I was not interested in making a documentary about Southern music today, but desired to explore the relationship between traditional music and the contemporary landscape through a more poetic lens. Moved by the themes and stories past down in songs, I let the music itself carry the pictures. 
Two years later, with the project now complete, I have begun working on a mock-up of a book which I believe is the ideal venue for this body of work. From the beginning I imagined this project in book form. With your help, I hope to make this book physical in the coming months.

If you are interested in helping bring Shane’s book to fruition, check out his Kickstarter campaign!

Shane Lavelette

The name Shane Lavalette first entered my consciousness when he created the innovative and stellar magazine, Lay Flat.  While still a student, Shane excited the photo world with his new approach to publishing. His mastery of all things visual continues to be evident with his new body of work, Picturing the South.  Born in Vermont, Shane received his BFA from Tufts University in partnership with the School of the Museum of Art, Boston. He has exhibited and published widely, and is the Associate Director of Light Work.

Shane was commissioned by the High Museum of Art in Atlanta to create new photographs about the South, along with Martin Parr and Kael Alford, for an exhibition that opens at the museum on June 9th and runs through September 2, 2012. The exhibition features a companion exhibition, Picturing New York, with 150 historical works by Lewis Hine, Berenice Abbott, Walker Evans, Harry Callahan, and Diane Arbus.
In order to generate funds to publish a book of this work, Shane has created a Kickstarter campaign with some wonderful bonus items including prints, books, and music.



In
2010 I was commissioned by the High Museum of Art in Atlanta to create a
new body of photographs for their “Picturing the South” series, which
includes past artists Sally Mann, Emmet Gowin, Richard Misrach, Dawoud
Bey, Alex Webb and Alec Soth. I’m honored to be amongst these artists,
and look forward to exhibiting new work with photographers Martin Parr
and Kael Alford in June of 2012.

Images from Picturing the South
Having grown up in the Northeast, it was primarily through traditional
music—old time, blues, gospel, etc.—that I had formed a relationship
with the South. With that in mind, the region’s rich musical history
became the natural entry point for my work. I was not interested in
making a documentary about Southern music today, but desired to explore
the relationship between traditional music and the contemporary
landscape through a more poetic lens. Moved by the themes and stories
past down in songs, I let the music itself carry the pictures. 

Two years later, with the project now complete, I have begun working on a
mock-up of a book which I believe is the ideal venue for this body of
work. From the beginning I imagined this project in book form. With your
help, I hope to make this book physical in the coming months.