Tag Archives: HBO

Witness, a film on HBO tomorrow night

I happened to be in a hotel room in Colorado, watching The Bang Bang Club when I received an e-mail about a 4-part movie presented on HBO tomorrow night. Links backlinks blog comments .  


Witness: Juarez, a four-part documentary series from award-winning filmmaker Michael Mann debuts this Monday, November 5th at 9:00p.m.ET/PT. The film follows combat photographer Eros Hoagland as he explores Juarez, Mexico, the “murder capital of the world” where drug violence has left over 10,000 dead.

Presented in four parts  JuarezLibyaSouth Sudan and Rio  Witness focuses on three determined photojournalists: Eros Hoagland, who explores the gang- and drug-related violence in both Juarez, Mexico and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Michael Christopher Brown, who chronicles escalating ethnic tensions in the wake of Muammar Gaddafis ouster last year in Libya; and Vronique de Viguerie, who follows the Arrow Boys and their struggle against General Kony in South Sudan. Between these three, their photos have appeared in TimeNewsweekThe New York TimesThe AtlanticParis MatchThe Guardian and many other publications.

The Loving Story: Loving v. Virginia and the Photographs of Grey Villet

More of Grey Villet’s LIFE photographs of Richard and Mildred Loving are presented in a special gallery at the new Life.com.

Nancy Buirski and Elisabeth Haviland James, the team behind HBO’s The Loving Story, were secretly hoping to get a little more material when they went to show an early trailer of their documentary to the family of the movie’s subjects in the summer of 2010. The film tells the story of Richard Perry Loving and Mildred Loving, the serendipitously named couple behind the landmark 1967 Supreme Court case Loving v. Virginia, who were exiled from Virginia for violating the state’s anti-miscegenation laws. (The case overturned all such laws, making interracial marriage legal nationwide.) Buirski, the film’s director and writer, and James, her co-producer, already had a treasure trove of video footage of their subjects, but they thought a few more family snapshots would provide a nice touch.

Peggy Loving, the couple’s daughter, was impressed by what she saw. She told Buirski that she did have some family photographs, left the room and returned carrying 70 10-by-13 prints taken by photojournalist Grey Villet in 1965 for LIFE magazine.

Buirski, who has worked both as a photo editor at the New York Times and as the director of the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival, immediately recognized what she saw. “Elisabeth and I just looked at each other,” she says, “and I think we might have even had tears in our eyes.”

It’s not unusual for a documentary film to rely on photographs to illustrate history, but The Loving Story demonstrates a unique way of doing so. Because Buirski had unearthed Villet’s photos, she was able to use the work of a single photographer to tell the story. And, for the most part, the photos used in the film are scans of the actual vintage prints owned by the Loving family. Buirski says that consistency allowed her to escape from the constraints of documentary style: rather than show a picture to go along with a specific point in the narrative, she was able to set a consistent mood and even, in some cases, to let the images speak for themselves without help of a voiceover.

The photographs also allowed the filmmakers to show the human side of the Lovings’ story, something that was not as present in the video footage. Most of the video used in The Loving Story was filmed by Hope Ryden, a cinema-verité filmmaker who had taken an interest in the case. The Lovings were initially reticent to participate. They were living in Virginia illegally and, rather than attempt to cast themselves as Civil Rights heroes, they were, as Mildred Loving puts it in one of Ryden’s interviews, just “trying to get home.” The couple was convinced by their lawyers, Bernard Cohen and Philip Hirschkop, that Ryden was trustworthy; even so, Buirski feels that the Lovings put up walls when confronted with movie cameras and microphones.

Not so with Villet’s still camera. “A photojournalist like [Villet] tends to be able to disappear in a story like that,” says Buirski. As such, the photographs he took are more intimate than the video was. Rather than answer questions about legal matters, the Lovings kiss, hold hands and play with their children.

“[The photographs] opened up a window on their love,” says Buirski.

The Loving Story premieres on HBO on Feb. 14, at 9 p.m. ET.

An exhibit of Grey Villet’s photographs of the Loving family that were discovered in the course of filming is also currently on view, through May 6, at the International Center of Photography in New York City.

Documentary Film: One Thousand Pictures: RFK’s Last Journey

On June 6, 1968, in the midst of his campaign to be president of the United States, Robert F. Kennedy died from an assassin’s bullet. Two days later, after a funeral mass in New York City, his casket was placed on a special train bound for Arlington National Cemetery. A journey that should have taken hours took all day, as thousands of Americans lined the 225 miles of track in a spontaneous outpouring of grief. Paul Fusco was the only journalist on the train, and he ended up taking more than a thousand pictures from his window. These images can be seen in the Aperture publication Paul Fusco: RFK.

Now on the 43rd anniversary of the event, documentary filmmaker Jennifer Stoddart brings Fusco’s images to life. Atlanta Search engine Optimization . Personal stories are told by Fusco, and RFK’s then-press secretary, as well as by the people who appeared in Fusco’s images, recalling the emotional impact of Kennedy’s assassination on the country. The film also includes video and audio clips of Bobby Kennedy speaking so eloquently and passionately about his hopes and dreams for the country.

Watching the documentary was a moving experience for an American like me, who lived through those sad and rocky moments in America’s history. And once again, I am reminded of the power of photography to capture a mood and feeling, and how a multimedia presentation like this documentary can serve to intensify the meaning of almost each and every image.

The documentary film, ONE THOUSAND PICTURES: RFKS LAST JOURNEY, airs on Wednesday, June 8 at 8 p.m. ET. And tonight, Monday, June 6 at 6:30, Paul Fusco and filmmaker Jennifer Stoddart will host an artist’s talk and book signing at the Aperture Gallery and Bookstore in Chelsea. zoekmachine optimalisatie . 547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor.

The trailer for this film can also be viewed at HBO.

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

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Paul Fusco, RFK Funeral Train, 1968

One Thousand Pictures: R.F.K’s Last Journey, Film and Panel Discussion

On June 6, 1968, in the midst of his campaign for president, Robert F. Kennedy died from an assassin’s bullet. Two days later, on June 8, after a funeral mass in New York City, his casket was placed on a special train bound for Arlington National Cemetery. A journey that should have taken hours took all day, as thousands of Americans lined the 225 miles of track in a spontaneous outpouring of grief. Photographer Paul Fusco was on the train, and ended up taking more than a thousand pictures from his window. These images can be seen in the Aperture publication Paul Fusco: RFK.

Now, on the 43rd anniversary of the event, documentary filmmaker Jennifer Stoddart and HBO brig Fusco’s images to life. Told by those who appeared in Fusco’s images as they stood on the tracks 43 years ago, One Thousand Pictures: R.F.K’s Last Journey chronicles the complex impact of Kennedy’s assassination on the country.

Aperture is honored to host a panel discussion featuring Magnum photographer Paul Fusco, filmmaker Jennifer Stoddart, and gallertist James Danziger to discuss the images and their ongoing impact.

In 2008 Aperture published Paul Fusco: RFK during the fortieth anniversary of Robert F. Kennedy’s assassination in Los Angeles while campaigning for the presidential nomination, is the long-awaited follow-up to Fusco’s acclaimed RFK Funeral Train, a body of work heralded as a contemporary classic. This historical new publication features over seventy never-before-seen images, many selected from the untapped treasure trove of slides that comprise the Library of Congress’s Look Magazine Photograph Collection.

Paul Fusco a member of Magnum Photos since 1974, began his career photographing for the U.S. Signal Core during the Korean War. He studied photojournalism at Ohio University and his work has been widely published and exhibited, including exhibitions at the Photographers’ Gallery, London, and the International Festival of Photojournalism, Perpignan, France.

Monday, June 6, 6:30 pm

FREE

Aperture Gallery and Bookstore
New York

Exclusive film debut on HBO2:
Wednesday, June 8, 8:00 pm.

Click here for more details about the event.

Click here to purchase a limited edition print by Paul Fusco.