Tag Archives: Hardcover Book

Carlo Van de Roer

I once had my aura read and having my energy analyzed was an insightful experience. The color of those energies is what Carlo Van de Roer looks at when making his unique and engaging aura portraits. Carlo is producing a book of these intriguing portraits and has created a Kickstarter campaign to bring attention and monies to the projectThe portrait of Miranda July, below, is one of my favorites.
Miranda July
Miranda July
Carlo was born in
Wellington, New Zealand. He received a BFA from Victoria University before
working and exhibiting internationally in the United States, New Zealand, the
United Kingdom and France. Carlo has received the ADC Young Guns Award, the APA
Silver to Pixels Award for Fine Art and the PDN Pix Award. He was named a Top
50 Photographer by Photolucida and received the Honorable Mention for the BMW
Paris Photo Prize in 2010. His work has been featured in the New York Times,
The New Yorker, INTERVIEW magazine, Vogue Italia, Wired Magazine and
NPR. Work from The Portrait Machine Project has been exhibited
at M+B Gallery in LA, Suite Gallery in NZ, Festival d’Hyères and Carrousel du
Louvre in France.

His Kickstarter campaign is featured in the video below. Consider helping him reach his goals by contributing here.


The Portrait Machine Project Book is a collection of polaroid
aura portraits of subjects ranging from my grandmother to Miranda July,
Terence Koh and James Frey. The 9.75 x12 inch, 96 page, full color,
hardcover book also includes the camera generated diagrams/descriptions
that accompany each polaroid.

This project started when I was making polaroid portraits here in NY. I was interested in the idea that a camera could offer an insight into the subject’s character or my relationship with them, especially if its a portrait of someone you know. The relationship between the camera, photographer, subject and viewer was something I wanted to explore. 
I started using the polaroid aura camera because of what it promised to do, it was invented in an attempt to record what a psychic might see. This seemed like a familiar idea to me — that a camera could provide an otherwise unseen insight.
The tension, or harmony, between the portraits and the people I was photographing was something I wanted to make accessible to you as the viewer, so I started including people that might be familiar.
The camera is built around an instant land camera, it gets attached directly to the subject by sensors which read biofeedback, that’s converted into information about the them and is depicted as color in the polaroid. The camera also generates a printed diagram and description which includes information about their character and how they are seen by others.

Example of how the camera generate the color seen in the image above.

Barbara Cole

I met Barbara Cole a number of years ago at Review Santa Fe and I became an immediate fan of her work and person.  She was (and is) from Toronto and working as an editorial and fine art photographer, producing the majority of her work underwater. Her projects not only made an impression at the reviews, but have been celebrated all over the world in both arenas. Barbara was awarded  the Grand Prize, the 6ème Festival International de la Photographie de Mode in Cannes, France, her work has been exhibited in numerous solo exhibitions in galleries and museums, and now can be found as a beautiful, hardcover book.  
The monograph, Barbara Cole, is 110 pages of painterly photographs, with essays by Jeanne Beker and Sara Angel. Barbara will be having a book launch and artist signing at BAU-XI Photo this Thusday, June 28th. Please contact Rosie or Julie at BAU-XI Photo via e-mail ([email protected]) if you would like to pre-order a book.
The book represents four different bodies of work – united by one
thing- water. The first series, titled Underworld was fairly instinctual. I’ve been a swimmer all of my
life and it just seemed natural to build a bridge between my career in
photography and my love of water. 
Barbara will also be opening an exhibition, Two People Walking on a Tightrope in an Ordinary Life Full of Extraordinary Moments, tonight a the Galerie Le Royer in Montreal, Canada.
While Underworld was more meditative and calm, the second series, White Noise is about the disturbance of a body moving through water.  Chromatics was inspired by the colour field painters of the fifties, (Rothko and Frankenthaler) and added unusual colours that were not usually identified with underwater work. I flattened the perspective by shooting from above and the figures were instructed to move in front of the camera as if they were paint on a brush. 
The last body is, Two People Walking A Tightrope In An Ordinary Life Full of Extraordinary Moments. My inspiration was dance and in particular the words of George Balanchine. “Don’t express your inner feelings show me what they look like.” 

“Steve McCurry: Iconic Photographs”

In 2003, Steve McCurry accepted the award for Outstanding Achievement in Photojournalism at the inaugural Lucie Awards held at The Beverly Hilton. Over a 20 year span, he has changed the industry, creating iconic photographs of the September 11 attacks to captivating images of everyday, human life in countries such as India, the war-stricken Middle East, and Asia.

A limited edition hardcover book, “Steve McCurry: The Iconic Photographs,” (2011) Phaidon Press has released 165 of his most famous colorful photographs from throughout his career. tree trimmers . Each one of his books contains an exclusively signed print by Steve McCurry himself.

In his photograph, “Beggar Girl, Bombay, India” (1993) during the monsoon in August, McCurry was approached by a mother and child while waiting at a stoplight in his car begging for money. McCurry gives us more insight on capturing this moment.

 

McCurry continues his efforts to show everyday life around the world. Earthquake Insurance California . With his photograph, “Widow, Vrindavan, India” (1995) the image only shows a woman hunched over, but her misfortune does not tell her story.

 

This dramatic image, “Camels, Gulf War, Kuwait” (1991) of intense clouds of smoke takes over the entire image, but McCurry tells us the real story behind the photograph.

 

Steve McCurry: The Iconic Photographs is available from Phaidon.com

 

Yutaka Takanashi: Photography 1965-74



A month ago marked the start of the 2010 Les Rencontres D’Arles smoking convention which I attended for a few days. I found a small number of books (still trying to show restraint) which I will mention in the upcoming weeks. The main draw for me is the competition which names one “contemporary” book and one “historical” book as “best of the year” – the winners get 8000 euros each. Last year I entered the first Errata Editions books for the historical prize and we didn’t fair very well. The judges that year were extremely critical of the concept of my books and not for the reasons you would think. (See my report from last year for more details).

So this year I entered the new Errata books with no hope of a prize but purely to help introduce them to a new audience. That Saturday, the day I was leaving, they made the final decision on the two awards and I was excited, not to mention surprised, to hear that this year’s judges liked the series so much they were considering them for the historical prize. Their final decision went to Japanese Photobooks of the 60s and 70s from Aperture instead, but I am pleased to say that during the award ceremony that evening, they gave Errata Editions a special runner-up mention.

The winner of the contemporary book went to Only Photography‘s fine book Yutaka Takanashi Photography 1965-74. Only Photography is Roland Angst’s independent publishing house in Berlin. Their books are beautifully produced with a strong care towards design and printing and the Takanashi book is their best so far. Past titles have been Ray K. Metzker’s Automagic and Frauke Eigen’s Shoku.

This hardcover book presents an edit of 41 images from Toshi-e in a large vertical format and the selection corresponded to an exhibition of mostly vintage prints that was on display at Galerie Priska Pasquer in Cologne, Germany. This marked the first solo showing of Takanashi in Germany. One of the gallery directors, Ferdinand Bruggemann is a specialist on Japanese photography and contributes a fine essay on Takanashi and his masterwork, Toshi-e. A second essay by Hitoshi Suzuki, who was an assistant to Kohei Suguira the book’s designer, provides a personal remembrance of discovering the book in Seguira’s design studio while it was being created. A short preface from the gallerist Priska Pasquer opens the book.

Yutaka Takanashi Photography 1965-74 is beautifully realized with three different cover images silk screened onto the cloth of the boards. A yellow translucent dustjacket wraps the book and the color I have been told reflects the tone off an exhibition poster from the first solo exhibit of this work in Japan in the 1980s. The printing of the plates is also exquisite – a modern offset interpretation of the original’s lush gravure which remains rich and clean. The design reflects the twisting and turning of the original (horizontals oriented vertically) but with additional gatefolds for a few of the horizontal pictures. It was printed in an edition of only 500, 30 of which come signed and numbered with a print. An additional 100 were signed and numbered by Takanashi. I strongly recommend this book if you can get one. They are a bit pricey but I assure you it is because these books were expensive to produce.

So this year was a clean sweep of awards nodding towards Japan (it was also our study of Toshi-e that had gotten the main attention from the jury). My congratulations go to Aperture and Roland of Only Photography, I don’t mind coming in second when the competition was that strong.