Tag Archives: Group Exhibition

The 2012 LENSCRATCH Pets and Favorite Animals Exhibition

Thanksgiving, for those living in the United States, is a day to come together with family and friends and give thanks for all that we have in our lives.  We sit down at a groaning table of traditional foods and see faces that sometimes are only an annual event. What we are celebrating today, are the faces that might just be under the table, waiting for possibility and a little affection: our pets.  They are as much our family members as those who are connected by blood or circumstance, and in many cases, they are the family that we choose.

Some of you may remember my farewell post to the love of my life, Riley.  It’s been a year since her passing and the loss is as profound as that of those loved ones in my life.  So in memory of her, give your furry or feathered loved ones an extra pat, a piece of turkey, and a little extra attention today.  I thank you for sharing in this wonderful celebration of those who live amongst us. Again a huge thank you to Grant Gill and Sarah Stankey for their help with this post.
Aline Smithson, Riley, modeling, Los Angeles, CA


Randy Karg, Shiner, Clarinda, IA


Robin Tryloff, Ben and George, Oakbrook, Illinois

Kylie Torrence, Dusty, Atlanta GA

Charidy Bunsa, Cody, Largo, FL

Shawna Gibbs, Sehan with Inchworm, Claremont, NH
In honor of all the little insects that, despite our most innocent and
gentle intentions, gave their lives to curious minds this summer.

Gina Kelly, Mister entertained, Simon bored, Minneapolis, MN


Laurie McCormick, Raisin-RIP, Brentwood, CA


Phyllis Schwartz, Chow’s Last Portrait, Vancouver, BC

Morganna Magee, Tyler and Percy, Melbourne, Australia
This is Tyler and his cat Percy. Tyler is 10 years
old and completely blind after he had both of his eyes removed when he developed cancer in both of them when he was aged 3. He calls Percy his
best friend, and Percy is gentle and patient with him, only getting
agitated if he is locked out of Tyler’s room and can’t sleep in his bed
with him.

Larry TornoMaggie, St. Louis, MO
Maggie was a constant
companion for 17 years, often following me into my office in the morning
and taking her place until closing time, when she sat at the door,
waiting to be fed. 

Isabella La Rocca, Lulu, Berkely, CA
This image is one of a series I call Dog Park.  The dog in the picture is my 12 year old constant companion, Lulu.  I got her as a puppy from a shelter and we adore each other.

Cleo Schoeplein, Fig and Riley, Los Angeles, CA

Michelle Rogers Pritzl, Berlin Kitty, Tustin, CA

Mike Whiteley, Hailey, Mission: Wolf, Colorado
Hailey is a Grey Wolf living at Mission: Wolf in Southern Colorado, a
wolf sanctuary with about two dozen wolves mostly from captive breed
wolves that cannot be released back into the wild. I have been there a
few times to volunteer and help care for the wolves and I am always
amazed in how their wildness transcends their breeding and cages.

Susan BoecherMara and Cat, Minneapolis, MN

Angela MarklewFreyja, Venice, CA
In
the summer of 2010 I found a puppy on the street in Watts.  She was
emaciated and near death.  It was a long road but she made it through –
the full story of her ordeal is here: 

K.B. Dixon, Frick & Frack, Bandon, OR
This is a pair of guard dogs at an art gallery in Bandon ,Oregon.

Holly Connellan, Guard Dogs, Sydney, Australia

Caroline McLean, Monkey and Windsors, Boulder, Colorado
Monkey and Windsor in Boulder, Colorado on hike!
Monkey is my daughter’s dog and Windsor is my son’s dog.  They are
sister and brother, little and big, one likes to cuddle and the other
plays ball.  They get along only because  and not by choice.  Food is
often a bone of contention.  I love my dogs because they teach me about
tolerance, patience and life.  Dog hair is a fact of life, stubborn
behavior drives me crazy and they live and die. I thank all my pets in
recent years: Brandy, Moose, Pickle, Molly, Belle, Gunther and Tucky.
Happy Thanksgiving blessings!

Mary Anne MitchellPlaytime, Atlanta, GA

Linda Alterwitz, Ruby, Las Vegas, Nevada

Rana Nicole Young, Marli, Portland, OR

Donna Rosser, Sadie on the Sofa, Fayetteville, GA


Sadie
is a rescue from a local kill shelter. The shelter workers believed she was a
good dog — so she was kept there for about a month before we found her. We call
her the ‘monkey dog’ for the way she vocalizes to us and say that she has the
personality of a 5 year old. Sadie likes to hunt for rabbits in the backyard —
but she is also a couch potato. She is one of the best dogs I have ever had and
I don’t think I have ever taken a bad photo of her. 

Fabiano Busdraghi, where should we go?, Bernardo O’Higgins Base, Antarctica

Christine Anderson, Hurricane Sandy, North New Jersey
During the hurricane and following Nor’ Easter. My dog Reggie was not
fearful of the storm and became the way I portrait how I experienced the
storm and days after.  I started to call her STORMTRACKER REGGIE when I
started to to use pictures of Reggie to give online updates on the
storm until I lost power…

Julie Rae Powers, Zaira, Ripley, WV

Kristy CarpenterGus and Judy, Bronson, MI
Gus follows my mother around like a lovestruck teenager. Knowing he’s
there, always watching over her, helps me sleep better at night.

Vicki Hunt, Cami, Birmingham, Alabama
Jeremy Nix, Mister Bojangles, Denver, CO
We lost Mister Bo this year, this was my favorite picture of him that I took. 

Bob Johnson, Frenzy, Ballona Wetlands, Marina del Rey, CA
Lost Sasha and Homer, my dogs, to old age, so I decided to adopt the
wildlife in the Ballona wetlands as my playmates and photo subjects.
 Homer and Sasha were camera shy, but the Ballona residents are
exceptionally cooperative. 

Kevin McCollister, Luna Walks Into The Light, Los Angeles, CA

Heidi Lender, Untitled, from the series Once Upon, Garzon, Uruguay
The Bubba….best friend, muse, my Cindy Crawford, road-tripping
partner, bunny-hunter, bear-fighter and all around best little guy in
the world.

Morgan Hagar, Roxy’s Springtime Snooze, Denver, CO

Sheri Lynn Behr, 19 Year Old Crockett Keeping Warm After Hurricane Sandy, Edgewater, NJ

Robbie Kaye, Nico & Luna on the Trail

Adriana Reyes Newell, Carmelita-Lightning Dog, Nambe, NM
Carmelita was a husky-boxer mix puppy adopted from the shelter when she
was 2 months old. At age 7 she was diagnosed with bone cancer and
underwent surgery to remove her left arm. She also endured chemotherapy
for 4 months after which she came back to her playful and energetic
self. In July 2012 her cancer spread to her lungs and skin. She lost the
fight on September 11th 2012. We miss her terribly and her absence
feels more like a pestering presence that wont let go. The only
consolation is that she is no longer in pain.

Susan Weingartner, The Roar, Los Angeles, CA 

Michael was adopted from a shelter when he was just 6 weeks old.  He’s
one of the funniest cats I’ve ever met, always needing to enroll
everyone in his games, especially “fetch” , “chase the kitties”, and “da
bird”.

Jim Robertson, Lost But Found, Lexington, KY

Sharon Johnson-Tennant, Phoebe


Heather McKay Bowes, Catnap, Epsom, NH

Consuelo Mendez, Beluga my Cat, Caracas, Venezuela

Paul Matzner, Lucca in Lake, Milwaukee, WI

Lucca, our five year old golden-doodle loves the beach, eating raw
meat, and
being affectionate with us. He is a comfort and a joy.
Alaina Dall, Little Thief, San Diego, CA
“I doubt anyone will notice if one goes missing…”
Max Juhasz, Absolute Beginner, Cres Isle, Croatia
Dennis Stewart, Gilligan, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Lucy Carolan, Bonnie, Wolsingham, UK
Mary Defer, Ruby Extends a Paw, Garrettville, OH
Zoe Perry-Wood, Babu in Bat Wings, Lexington, MA
Ivan McClellan, The Lazy Meatball, Lake of the Woods, OR
Kevin Ooi, Stereotypical Indulgence, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia 
Anne Connor, Henry’s Lament, Ridgeway, WI
Patty Lemke, The End of Film, Los Angeles, CA
As shown here, Jewels was inquisitive and quite simply a wonderful cat. 

CONTINUE TO PART TWO
(Click OLDER POSTS)

Palais de Tokyo Young Curators Season 2013 Open Call

Dedicated to the emergence of the newest forms of contemporary art as it is, the Palais de Tokyo sees participating in the renewal of the ecosystem of art as part of its remit. This is why it undertakes to seek out and support new players, and new directions. Thus in the summer of 2013 the Palais de Tokyo is entrusting its entire programme schedule to “young curators”. Selected on the basis of the proposals they submit, the winners will bear witness to the perpetual reinvention of the issues involved in curating an exhibition, their scouting talent, and their ability to dream up new ways of relating to art. This event is likewise intended to demonstrate the dynamism of Paris and the surrounding area as part of a joint initiative involving a great many partners and institutions.

APPLICATION FILE:
The proposed project must clearly demonstrate innovative thinking about exhibition formats. Whether it relates to a solo or a group exhibition, it must envisage occupying a surface area that can be as large as 250 sq. m. It must be capable of evolving in accordance with the technical constraints and the diversity of spaces that apply at the Palais de Tokyo. The selection will be made primarily on the basis of the inventiveness of the project, its curatorial boldness, and its relevance in the current field of creative work. Applicants can indicate a preference as regards the typology of space best suited to their proposal. Applicants can be curators and/or artists.

The application file will consist of:

1. a statement of intent
2. an illustrated list of proposed artists (and/or works)
3. an estimated budget in euros comprising the items: production of works, transport, materials and equipment required
4. a CV
5. an artistic documentation giving a short description of the previous curatorial projects carried out by the applicant
6. anything else likely to shed light on the proposed project

File to be forwarded before 30 September, 2012

– In digital format to: [email protected]
– As a hard copy to: Palais de Tokyo, Young Curators, 13 av du prsident Wilson, F-75116 Paris, France

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:
Applicants must be under 40 years of age.

SELECTION METHODS:
The Palais de Tokyo will bring together a jury consisting of seven curators from its team, its President, Jean de Loisy, and several suitably qualified notabilities. Following an initial selection, the applicants chosen will present their proposal to the jury in person. The traveling expenses of the applicants selected to present their proposals orally will be covered by the Palais de Tokyo. Between ten and fifteen winners will be named following this second phase.

FOLLOW-THROUGH OF THE PROJECT:
Each winner will be assigned a curator as their main contact at the Palais de Tokyo and will be supported by the production service throughout the implementation of the project. squido lense . The total estimate budget for the season is 500,000, excluding caretaking and security, mediation and communication. Each curator selected will receive a sum of 1500 euros as a fee, not to be included in the estimated budget.

TIMETABLE:
Call for applications: beginning of June 2012

Applications to be submitted before 30 September, 2012

Oral interviews of those selected in the first round: 5 November, 2012

Winners announced during the week of 5 November, 2012

Exhibition: June 2013

APPENDIX:
For information, a plan of the Palais de Tokyo etc click here.

FRESH: The Wall / The Page / The Internet

FRESH: The Wall / The Page / The Internet

A collaboration with Klompching Gallery

Editor's Note: Flak Photo is proud to partner with Klompching Gallery to present photography stories from FRESH, a group exhibition featuring five new voices in contemporary image-making. The objective of Klompching's annual summer program is to showcase photography that is fresh in approach and vision. This year's exhibition was curated by photo collector Fred Bidwell and gallerist Darren Ching and is on view through August 18, 2012. For more information, visit Klompching.com

 

Barbara Ciurej and Lindsay Lochman, Fraxinus (Ash) impression with Diann, seed pods, 2011

Barbara Ciurej & Lindsay Lochman: The hybrid process used in Natural History is a combination of cyanotype experimentation and our portraits of older women. Lindsay coated one of the digitally printed portraits with cyanotype solution, placed a frond from a bleeding heart plant on it and exposed it to the sun. The black and white portrait emerged through the Prussian blue “photogram” of the botanicals. What developed was a revelation — the moment when ideas synthesize and photography becomes a medium of magical alignment. The impressions created a layering of narratives that we search for in making our work. The process recalled Anna Atkins, the 19th-century botanist who first used cyanotype to produce her books on British ferns and algae. The unpredictable application of cyanotype solution on paper is the antithesis of the mechanical product of the digital print. In these transformed portraits, surface and interior blur; historical processes blend with contemporary techniques and remind us of the evanescence of light and life – the shadow we live in.

Ciurej & Lochman are based in Chicago, Ill. and Milwaukee, Wis. Learn more about them on their Flak Photo Profile »

 

Tabitha Soren, Running 001314, 2012

Tabitha Soren: For the past two and a half years, my Running series has taken me from my home in California to twelve states, Mexico and Canada in search of willing subjects. The only casting requirement was that the people could run. In this series, I’m attempting to acknowledge the world unseen beyond the frame, while caging my subjects inside. When people are running, their bodies contort and we get to glimpse emotions that are normally hidden. The fight or flight response is something each of us can connect with. Yet, the cause and effect of what is happening in each Running picture remains a mystery. I’m inviting viewers to mine their own secrets to expand on each picture's narrative. I want them to participate. The role of accident, panic and resilience are consistent themes in my work and sometimes all three arise during one shoot. For example, for Running 000516, my next-door neighbor, an opera singer, came out of the water with her body covered in flesh-colored leeches. I had no idea leeches came in any other color than black so naturally, a surge of horror and guilt came over me for what I had just put her through. However, because the singer had grown up on a Bay Area commune, she said, “Oh yeah, this has happened before,” and casually plucked them off one by one with her towel.

Tabitha Soren is based in Berkely, California. Learn more about her on her Flak Photo Profile »

 

Martin Bogren, Lowlands 08, Skurup, Sweden, 2009

Martin Bogren: From the beginning, I wanted to make a portrait of my childhood village, but along the way this project came to be more about memories, about growing up — and a more personal and subjective story began to take shape. I've always traveled and I frequently make photographs that tell personal stories in foreign places. It’s easy to fascinate one’s self with exotic locales and the Lowlands project was a way for me to photograph something closer, something part of myself. I began to make images of the people and places in my home village four years ago. In the beginning I worked mostly with pocket and rangefinder cameras, and the pictures I was making resembled classic documentary. A few years ago, I started working with a medium format (6×6) camera, which slowed down my process and put me closer to my subjects. I tend to be most productive in late summer in the seasonal shift just before the fall. There is a kind of "after summer” look to these images. It's something with the light, but also in my mood.

Martin Bogren is based in Malmo, Sweden. Learn more about him on his Flak Photo Profile »

 

Monika Merva, Irma's Peaches, Budapest, Hungary, 2010

Monika Merva: After completing a long-term, site-specific project I wanted to do something personal, that got back to my roots. At the time I was a stay-at-home mom, so it made sense to photograph my family, friends and the objects I hold dear. These pictures were made in Budapest and Brooklyn, two cities I call home. The imperfect, perfect peaches were plucked from my cousin’s tree, the wet hair on my daughter’s back I see every evening during her bath, the portrait of a woman with a comb in her hair is of my great aunt, who held my hand while I jumped in puddles as a toddler, and the complex expression of the woman sitting in the gold chair belongs to my friend’s mother. Andrew Wyeth once said, “I think one’s art goes as far and as deep as one’s love goes.” I read that quote more than fifteen years ago while studying for myMFA. As I was scanning my bookcase for inspiration I found my bound thesis, covered in dust, and opened it up to read a few pages. Not much has changed my motivations for making photographs. For me, the camera helps convey my love and appreciation; it’s a way to explore the world.

Monika Merva is based in Brooklyn New York. Learn more about her on her Flak Photo Profile »

 

Shawn Rocco, #3321, Flicker (Series I), 2012

Shawn Rocco: Curiosity. It leads to exploration, discovery, understanding and knowledge. That is my attraction to documentary photography; I'm curious about life in all its aspects. How we live our lives, interconnected on so many levels, to each other and the planet. I'm also fascinated at how reality is processed through the mechanizations of the camera. I often photograph for no other reason than to see the world interpreted through the lens. And sometimes, like in this instance, the reward is witnessing a spectrum of reality that would otherwise go unnoticed. I was in an office taking ambient light exposures when I rocked back in a chair and happened to look up. With no preconception, I raised the camera. Surprisingly, through the LCD screen, I noticed that the flickering wavelengths of the fluorescent lighting above me were more distinctive than my naked eye could see. Attracted to the beauty of not just the image, but the act of discovering something new in the ordinary and familiar, I took a photo. Was the pattern peculiar to only this fixture? Is it just in this room? What was going on? This intriguing phenomenon invited exploration. I was curious and my camera showed me something new.

Shawn Rocco is based in Raleigh, North Carolina. Learn more about him on his Flak Photo Profile »

 

Get your work seen! Submit your projects for consideration of The Collection, Flak Photo's ever-expanding archive of contemporary image-makers. Featuring community contributions daily, Monday through Friday. Submission Info »

FRESH: The Wall / The Page / The Internet

FRESH: The Wall / The Page / The Internet

A collaboration with Klompching Gallery

Editor's Note: Flak Photo is proud to partner with Klompching Gallery to present photography stories from FRESH, a group exhibition featuring five new voices in contemporary image-making. The objective of Klompching's annual summer program is to showcase photography that is fresh in approach and vision. This year's exhibition was curated by photo collector Fred Bidwell and gallerist Darren Ching and is on view through August 18, 2012. For more information, visit Klompching.com

 

Barbara Ciurej and Lindsay Lochman, Fraxinus (Ash) impression with Diann, seed pods, 2011

Barbara Ciurej & Lindsay Lochman: The hybrid process used in Natural History is a combination of cyanotype experimentation and our portraits of older women. Lindsay coated one of the digitally printed portraits with cyanotype solution, placed a frond from a bleeding heart plant on it and exposed it to the sun. The black and white portrait emerged through the Prussian blue “photogram” of the botanicals. What developed was a revelation — the moment when ideas synthesize and photography becomes a medium of magical alignment. The impressions created a layering of narratives that we search for in making our work. The process recalled Anna Atkins, the 19th-century botanist who first used cyanotype to produce her books on British ferns and algae. The unpredictable application of cyanotype solution on paper is the antithesis of the mechanical product of the digital print. In these transformed portraits, surface and interior blur; historical processes blend with contemporary techniques and remind us of the evanescence of light and life – the shadow we live in.

Ciurej & Lochman are based in Chicago, Ill. and Milwaukee, Wis. Learn more about them on their Flak Photo Profile »

 

Tabitha Soren, Running 001314, 2012

Tabitha Soren: For the past two and a half years, my Running series has taken me from my home in California to twelve states, Mexico and Canada in search of willing subjects. The only casting requirement was that the people could run. In this series, I’m attempting to acknowledge the world unseen beyond the frame, while caging my subjects inside. When people are running, their bodies contort and we get to glimpse emotions that are normally hidden. The fight or flight response is something each of us can connect with. Yet, the cause and effect of what is happening in each Running picture remains a mystery. I’m inviting viewers to mine their own secrets to expand on each picture's narrative. I want them to participate. The role of accident, panic and resilience are consistent themes in my work and sometimes all three arise during one shoot. For example, for Running 000516, my next-door neighbor, an opera singer, came out of the water with her body covered in flesh-colored leeches. I had no idea leeches came in any other color than black so naturally, a surge of horror and guilt came over me for what I had just put her through. However, because the singer had grown up on a Bay Area commune, she said, “Oh yeah, this has happened before,” and casually plucked them off one by one with her towel.

Tabitha Soren is based in Berkely, California. Learn more about her on her Flak Photo Profile »

 

Martin Bogren, Lowlands 08, Skurup, Sweden, 2009

Martin Bogren: From the beginning, I wanted to make a portrait of my childhood village, but along the way this project came to be more about memories, about growing up — and a more personal and subjective story began to take shape. I've always traveled and I frequently make photographs that tell personal stories in foreign places. It’s easy to fascinate one’s self with exotic locales and the Lowlands project was a way for me to photograph something closer, something part of myself. I began to make images of the people and places in my home village four years ago. In the beginning I worked mostly with pocket and rangefinder cameras, and the pictures I was making resembled classic documentary. A few years ago, I started working with a medium format (6×6) camera, which slowed down my process and put me closer to my subjects. I tend to be most productive in late summer in the seasonal shift just before the fall. There is a kind of "after summer” look to these images. It's something with the light, but also in my mood.

Martin Bogren is based in Malmo, Sweden. Learn more about him on his Flak Photo Profile »

 

Monika Merva, Irma's Peaches, Budapest, Hungary, 2010

Monika Merva: After completing a long-term, site-specific project I wanted to do something personal, that got back to my roots. At the time I was a stay-at-home mom, so it made sense to photograph my family, friends and the objects I hold dear. These pictures were made in Budapest and Brooklyn, two cities I call home. The imperfect, perfect peaches were plucked from my cousin’s tree, the wet hair on my daughter’s back I see every evening during her bath, the portrait of a woman with a comb in her hair is of my great aunt, who held my hand while I jumped in puddles as a toddler, and the complex expression of the woman sitting in the gold chair belongs to my friend’s mother. Andrew Wyeth once said, “I think one’s art goes as far and as deep as one’s love goes.” I read that quote more than fifteen years ago while studying for myMFA. As I was scanning my bookcase for inspiration I found my bound thesis, covered in dust, and opened it up to read a few pages. Not much has changed my motivations for making photographs. For me, the camera helps convey my love and appreciation; it’s a way to explore the world.

Monika Merva is based in Brooklyn New York. Learn more about her on her Flak Photo Profile »

 

Shawn Rocco, #3321, Flicker (Series I), 2012

Shawn Rocco: Curiosity. It leads to exploration, discovery, understanding and knowledge. That is my attraction to documentary photography; I'm curious about life in all its aspects. How we live our lives, interconnected on so many levels, to each other and the planet. I'm also fascinated at how reality is processed through the mechanizations of the camera. I often photograph for no other reason than to see the world interpreted through the lens. And sometimes, like in this instance, the reward is witnessing a spectrum of reality that would otherwise go unnoticed. I was in an office taking ambient light exposures when I rocked back in a chair and happened to look up. With no preconception, I raised the camera. Surprisingly, through the LCD screen, I noticed that the flickering wavelengths of the fluorescent lighting above me were more distinctive than my naked eye could see. Attracted to the beauty of not just the image, but the act of discovering something new in the ordinary and familiar, I took a photo. Was the pattern peculiar to only this fixture? Is it just in this room? What was going on? This intriguing phenomenon invited exploration. I was curious and my camera showed me something new.

Shawn Rocco is based in Raleigh, North Carolina. Learn more about him on his Flak Photo Profile »

 

Get your work seen! Submit your projects for consideration of The Collection, Flak Photo's ever-expanding archive of contemporary image-makers. Featuring community contributions daily, Monday through Friday. Submission Info »

Baang + Burne Contemporary

Last year I wrote about two emerging gallerists, Charlie Grosso and Kesha Bruce from Baang + Burne Contemporary, that were shaking up the traditional system by creating six weekly exhibitions over the course of last fall. All exhibitions were held in pop-up spaces and these innovative entrepreneurs tapped into alternative outlets to garner attention and marry new communities to art.

Kesha Bruce and Charlie Grosso

Kesha and Charlie now have a call for artists that would like to be represented in an untraditional way. Consider taking a chance on possibility.

“After all the excitement following Baang + Burne Contemporary’s 2011
exhibition season, we’ve decided, once again, to do something a bit
unconventional.  In June we will be launching an international open call
to artists. 
Just to be clear, we aren’t doing an open call for a juried group
exhibition; we’re looking to sign new artists to our gallery for
inclusion in exhibitions, projects, and events for the 2012-2014
seasons. We’re offering the chance to be represented by the gallery. 
We want to find artists whose work we admire, and help to promote and
sell their work for the next two years.  The fact that their art will
be featured in an exhibition in New York City is really just the icing
on a very sweet cake.




Why Are We Doing This?
Let me tell you a little story.
Once upon a time a team of gallery directors went about the task of
finding new artists for their gallery. They asked their friends for
suggestions; they searched the internet; they did studio visits; they
went to MFA thesis exhibitions. After months of searching, they realized
something: They were doing this the hard way.

Why not put out the word you’re looking for new artists to work with,
tell the artists what type of partnership you have to offer them, and
then let interested artists come to you?  So that’s exactly what we’re
doing.

Why the Fee?
You learn a lot when you decide to open an art gallery.  First
lesson—everything costs much more money than you thought it would.  In
the pre-internet dark ages, sending submissions to a gallery was a real
chore.  Luckily, nowadays, submissions can be completed on-line.  Quick,
easy, and free, right?

Wrong.
Whether it means buying more storage for your e-mail server and
spending hours downloading thousands of individual images, or paying a
service to store and organize the images, accepting submissions on-line
costs money. A lot of money. In our case, we decided to license
software to handle the submissions. That meant an initial investment of
around $1000 before we’d even announced we were taking submissions.

Bottom line:  We need to charge a fee to cover our costs or we’d have
to forget about doing the open call all together. In the end we decided
we didn’t love the idea of charging artists money, but absolutely hated the
idea of not getting to see the exciting work you are making. .  The
lesser of two evils: We’re charging a $45 fee.  A relatively small pill
to swallow considering the opportunity we’re offering.



What’s In It For Artists?
From the very beginning our goal has been to create projects and
opportunities for artists that challenge the very idea of what an art
gallery can be. In the first 16 months of our existence, we produced 8
exhibitions and organized nearly 20 events bringing about unexpected
alliances and partnerships between creative fields outside the art world
and non-profit arts organizations.

We’re interested in engaging the world at large and presenting work
that generates cultural dialogue about what art can really do. We wanted
to educate our fellow artists and provide them with the tools,
information, and resources they need to advance their career.  If all of
the above makes your heart sing, you might be a perfect match for us.

So here you have it: This is what we do.  This is why we do it.  If
that trips your trigger, send us your work.  Let’s make something
exceptional happen.

Click Here to Apply. 

We are only accepting online submissions through the Call for Entry system.  Thank you!

The 1000 Words Award

The 1000 Words Award for European photographers is a major initiative in collaboration with The Other European Travellers, a project co-ordinated by Cobertura Photo and co-organised by Atelier de Visu, 1000 Words and Festival Voci di Foto in partnership with Magnum Photos. It is part-funded by The Education Audiovisual and Culture Exchange Agency (EACEA) under the auspices of the EU Culture Programme.

Photographers are invited to apply for an opportunity to realise a new body of work with the supervision of several high-profile photographers and industry experts.

Applications can be submitted online only. The closing date is 23 July 2012 (5pm GMT). There are 4 places available.

Fee: £25.00 (GBP)

The 1000 Words Award includes:

• £1,000 cash prize
• 18 month mentorship programme
• 3 workshops with Jeffrey Silverthorne, Antoine d’Agata and Patrick Zachmann in London, Marseille and Seville respectively, including financial assistance with accommodation and travel
• Travelling group exhibition through the UK, France, Spain and Italy
• Catalogue and DVD
• Feature in 1000 Words Photography Magazine.

The 1000 Words Award is open to photographers born or based in the EU.

An internationally renown jury will review each entry submitted. Their final 4 will join 8 other European photographers selected by Cobertura Photo and Atelier de Visu.

The 1000 Words Award selection panel is:

• Simon Baker, Curator of Photography at Tate
• Brett Rogers, Director of The Photographers’ Gallery, London
• Dewi Lewis, Director at Dewi Lewis Publishing
• Tim Clark and Michael Grieve, Editors at 1000 Words Photography Magazine.

All participants will be selected according to criteria of excellence of their artistic approach, gender parity, mix of backgrounds, diversity of concepts and the multiplicity of approaches.

How to apply

1. Please email a portfolio of 10-15 images from any previous project (JPEG format, 72 dpi, each image no larger than 1MB). Links to work online will not be considered
2. An artist statement of up to 150 words or a CV (You do not need to send a proposal for the new body of work at this stage)
3. Submission fee: £25 (Through Paypal please enter your name and use the “Buy Now” button below, or send a cheque made payable to 1000 Words Photography Ltd: to 1000 Words Photography, 29 The Arthaus, 205 Richmond Road, London, E8 3FF, UK)

Deadline: 23 July 2012 (5pm GMT)
Email submissions to: [email protected]




Eligibility

The 1000 Words Award is open to photographers of any age, born or based within the EU. Students in full-time or part-time education, including PhD students, are also eligible for the award. Applicants do not need to have completed a degree in photography or an art-based subject. Photographers working collaboratively can also apply.

Selection procedure

Application closing date: 23 July 2012
Receipt of applications acknowledged: 24 July 2012
Successful candidates announced: 6 August 2012
First local meeting: 26 September 2012
Workshop in Seville: 29 October – 3 November 2012
Second local meeting: 12 December 2012
Third local meeting: 20 February 2013
Workshop in London: March 2013
Fourth local meeting: 15 May 2013
Workshop in Marseille: July 2013
Catalogue launch: December 2013
Travelling exhibition: January 2014-

Workshops


© Jeffrey Silverthorne


Through his photography Jeffrey Silverthorne explores the question of sex and death, as well as the notions of boundary and transgression. Active since the end of the 60’s, he has been accumulating series on extreme subjects: a slaughter house, a morgue, brothels or a community of transvestites and transsexuals. Silverthorne abandons any notion of objective documentation, and instead further exposes himself and explores his own psychology in a series of intense and subjectively structured images. Born in Hawaii in 1946, Silverthorne studied at the Rhode Island School of Design and has gone on to publish his work in the books Directions For Leaving, Boystown, The Perfume of Desire and most recently Travel Plans in 2011. He has had numerous international exhibitions including Rencontres d’Arles and Musée de l’ Elysée. Jeffrey Silverthorne is represented by Agence Vu’ and Gallery Vu’ .

© Antoine d’Agata

Antoine d’Agata is without doubt one of the most unique and important photographers of our age. His imagery is characterised by an intense and highly subjective experience that pushes the limits of social documentary photography. Born in Marseille, 1961, he left France in 1990 to study at The International Centre for Photography (ICP) in New York alongside Nan Goldin and Larry Clark. His work has been published in the books Insomnia, Vortex, Stigma and Agonie amongst others, and he has been exhibited internationally at galleries and festivals including Rencontres d’Arles, Noorderlicht, FotoFreo and The Photographers Gallery, London. His latest exhibition, Anticorps, a world premiere of a grand touring overview, opened on the 26 May at The Hague Museum of Photography, and runs until the 3 September. He has been a member of Magnum Photos since 2004 and is represented by Galerie Les Filles du Calvaire in Paris.

Their workshops are designed to allow photographers to experiment with new approaches to the creative process. You will be encouraged to build intimate rapport with your subjects, incorporating personal vision and voice into your photography.

The topic of “The Other European Travellers” specifically relates to transformations in the lives of people who have travelled or migrated across Europe. It is also broad to allow you the freedom to produce more personal and self-experienced responses as well as conceptual interpretations of the brief.

A unique element of these workshops is marked by the involvement of several guest experts comprising photographers as well as curators, collectors and critics who will provide the following:

-Talks and seminars 
-Guided tours of exhibitions
-Visits to photo archives and family albums
-Access to private collections.

Each workshop lasts 5 days, and will be conducted in English. They will form the basis of your project.

Mentorship

Monthly group and one-to-one meetings with the 1000 Words editors will be held in London or by Skype/Internet to report on the progress of the participants’ projects. Sessions will be frank and informal with the view to providing photographers with the following:

-Discussion and critique of creative output
-The practical and conceptual vision needed to help attain your goals and develop the photographic project
-Assistance with self-representation, portfolio presentation and approaches to potential outlets in the editorial, publishing and gallery markets
-Resources to help enhance your work and realise the potential of your ideas.

Exhibitions

The workshop leaders (Jeffrey Silverthorne, Antoine d’Agata and Patrick Zachmann) and the participating photographers in The Other European Travellers project will show their work as a group exhibition in London, Seville and Marseille. The exhibition will then travel to other cultural venues, galleries and photography festivals across Europe. 

An innovative and engaging exhibition design will mix images, text and sound.

Catalogue and DVD

The publication will consist of the participants’ work alonside archive images and includes texts on the subject. The publication will be translated into 3 languages and have a print run of 1,500 copies. The accompanying DVD and sound files contribute to the project, and are based on material from different sources: interviews with the photographic subjects, sound files and musical scores. 

Feature on 1000 Words Photography Magazine

1000 Words will commission a highly-esteemed writer or photography critic to contribute an in-depth review of your final body of work which will be published in its distinctive and highly regarded online magazine alongside a carefully curated selection of your images.

Now on its fourteenth “issue” 1000 Words attracts approximately 140,000 unique visitors from more 120 countries every month. Its sister-site, the 1000 Words Blog, ranked at number 3 in The Top 25 UK Arts & Culture Blogs in a survey carried out by Creative Tourist in May 2010 and was also named as the winner of Arts Media Contacts’ Photography Blog of The Year Award 2010.

Sylvia Plachy: Lecture, Workshop, and Exhibition

© Sylvia Plachy

The Center for Photography at Woodstock
59 Tinker Street
Woodstock, NY
(845) 679-9957

Lecture: Saturday, June 2, 8:00 pm
Admission: $7 / $5 for members, seniors, and students.

Photographer Sylvia Plachy, a contributor to the Village Voice and The New Yorker for many years, will be discussing her career as a master storyteller.

Workshop: Saturday, June 2–Sunday, June 3
Click here for tuition costs.

In conjunction with this lecture is the workshop, Editing the Photo Essay. Participants will be able to edit and sequence their photographs alongside Plachy, in order to begin to build a photo essay, book, or exhibition.

 

This Side of Paradise

Exhibition on view through June 5, 2012
Thursday – Sunday, 1:00 – 7:00 pm
FREE

The Andrew Freedman Home
1125 Grand Concourse
Bronx, NY
(718) 293-8100

No Longer Empty, a not-for-profit arts organization, presents a group exhibition in the newly reopened Andrew Freedman Home. The Home was once built to be a haven for the rich elderly who had lost their fortunes. Bequeathed by millionaire Andrew Freedman, the Home provided not only food and shelter but all the accoutrements of a rich and civilized life style – white glove dinner service, a grand ballroom, a wood-paneled library, a billiard room, and a social committee who organized concerts, opera performances, and the like.

Referencing this quixotic history, This Side of Paradise references the past and reconnect the vision of Andrew Freedman to today’s Bronx and its realities. Sylvia Plachy is one of the featured artists and she is showing photographs that were published in 1980 for an article written by Vivian Gornick for The Village Voice. The images capture the lives of the residents at this time, showing them at their social hour, reading, or in silent contemplation.

Sylvia Plachy has appeared in Aperture issues 207 and 206. She also has two Aperture-published books, Self Portrait with Cows Going Home and Goings On About Town: Photographs for the New Yorker.

Filmmaker Daria Menozzi joins Survival Techniques

The Museum of Contemporary Photography recently added Italian filmmaker Daria Menozzi to the long list of international artists participating in its upcoming group exhibition, Survival Techniques.

Featuring more than a dozen artists from across the globe, Survival Techniques explores displacement, exile and the struggle to exist in a nation of constant turmoil. The exhibition, which runs April 12 through July 1, showcases people’s experiences living through political uncertainty and social unrest, while commenting on the one thing shared by them all: survival.

On Wednesday, April 11 – the day before Survival Techniques opens – the MoCP will host a screening of Menozzi’s film, Before Ai Weiwei. This film provides an intimate look into the life of Chinese artist, Ai Weiwei, as he estranges himself from the country where he lives and positions himself as a global force within the art world. It will be shown at 6 p.m. at 623 S. Wabash Ave.

For more information about this screening, visit the events page on the MoCP’s website. To learn more about the other artists exhibiting in Survival Techniques, visit the exhibitions page.