Tag Archives: Grants

A Photo Student Update

Shsssssshhhhh aphotostudent.com is sleeping.

But you can find me at The New Yorker’s Photo Booth or hanging out at http://jamespomerantz.tumblr.com

 

 

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Re Runs: Sarah Hadley

I’m stepping away from Lenscratch this week to work on a new personal website and prepare for upcoming photo activities…wanted to reintroduce you to some wonderful photographers featured several years ago, today with a post on Sarah Hadley that ran in 2009. Sarah is now the Director of the Filter Photo Festival in Chicago, coming up in October.


Chicago photographer, Sarah Hadley, has packed her suitcases and moved to Los Angeles, and the left coast is lucky to have her. Sarah works both as a fine art and editorial photographer, and manages to have a piled-high plate of awards, grants, and exhibitions. Much of Sarah’s fine art work has a reference to dreams, whether it be imagery of the space where we dream the most in Unconscious Terrain, or dreamy interpretations of places around the world.

I think every photographer talks about the magic of seeing that first image appear in a tray of developer and of being hooked for life. I believe a good photograph asks more questions than it answers, and my photography is a way for me to constantly challenge myself to really look at the world around me.

Images from Unconscious Terrain

There is something intangible about the best photographs, something that reminds us of the moment between wake and sleep, and of the beauty that we see and feel but cannot describe, and of our own mortality. These are the kinds of images I try to make.

Images from Venetian Dreams

Getty Awards $80,000 to Four Photojournalists at Perpignan

On Thursday, Getty Images awarded $80,000 in grants supporting the work of four international photojournalists. Bharat Choudhary, Kosuke Okahara, Paolo Marchetti and Sebastian Liste each received $20,000 prizes and editorial support as winners of the 2012 Getty Grants for Editorial Photography. An additional $20,000 was also pledged to the Chris Hondros Fund in order to further support photojournalism and public awareness initiatives through an award given to Andrea Bruce and Dominic Bracco in June.

Announced at Visa pour l’Image, the annual festival of photojournalism held in Perpignan, France, the grants—first established in 2004—aim to “enable emerging and established photojournalists to pursue projects of personal and editorial merit, focusing attention on significant social and cultural issues.”

This year’s panel of judges, including Whitney Johnson (Director of Photography, The New Yorker), Jean-Francois Leroy (Director, Visa pour l’Image), Barbara Griffin (Turner Broadcasting Systems), Kira Pollack (Director of Photography, TIME) and photographer Stephanie Sinclair, sorted through 328 story proposals from 60 countries, eventually narrowing in on four projects. According to Aidan Sullivan, Vice President of Assignments at Getty, these four winning projects “deal with a range of compelling and multifaceted issues, from the devastation caused by the Japanese natural disasters to modern day slavery in Brazil.”

Bharat Choudhary, an Indian photographer based in London, was recognized for his project, The Silence of Others, which aims to explore the societal and cultural alienation of Muslim youth in France. His project initially began two years ago by examining the ‘Islamophobia’ of aspects of American and British life. The grant will allow Choudhary to continue his project, delving further into specific triggers inherent to French society.

Four years ago, Paolo Marchetti began FEVER – The Awakening of European Fascism after noticing a resurgence of interest in extreme right-wing politics. The Rome-based photographer has documented the exponential growth of citizens fleeing their own country in the wake of the Arab Spring. Marchetti will expand the project to other European countries with the award funds.

Tokyo-based photographer Kosuke Okahara documented the devastation at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant following the earthquake that struck Japan in March 2011. The grant will help Okahara continue Fragments/Fukushima as he investigates the true meaning of the disaster upon the world’s populations through images and audio interviews.

Sebastian Liste‘s project, The Brazilian Far West, explores the inequalities caused by Brazil’s slow and gradual abolition of slavery, particularly affecting the plight of peasants. Liste, a Spaniard, plans to create a multimedia map illustrating the origins of Brazilian inequality and violence, utilizing photography, video and first person interviews to draw attention to the effects caused by 4% of Brazil’s landowners controlling 80% of the country’s arable land.

The Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography are awarded each year. The projects of past recipients may be viewed here.

Justyna Badach, Phil

Justyna Badach, Phil

Justyna Badach

Phil,
Pennsylvania, 2008
From the Bachelor Portraits series
Website – JustynaBadach.com

Justyna Badach’s work has been exhibited internationally and is included in the collections of Museet for Fotokunst Brandts, Odense, Denmark. Cranbrook Museum of Art and The Center for Photography,Woodstock. She is the recipeint of numerous grants and awards including: The Independence Foundation Artist Fellwoship, The Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and The Leeway Foundation. Her work is represented by Gallery 339 in Philadelphia.

Jessica Auer, Skogafoss

Jessica Auer, Skogafoss

Jessica Auer

Skogafoss,
Iceland, 2011
From the Re-creational Spaces series
Website – JessicaAuer.com

Jessica Auer is a documentary-style landscape photographer from Montréal. Drawing inspiration from history and archeology, her work is largely concerned the study of cultural sites. From the beaten track to the frontier, Jessica explores places where history and mythology are woven into the landscape, and where contemporary landscape issues emerge. She received her MFA in Studio Arts from Concordia University in 2007 and is the recipient of several grants and awards. Her work has been exhibited in Canada and the United States and is held in various private and public collections, including the Musée des Beaux Arts du Québec and the Canada Council Art Bank. Jessica is a co-founder and co-director of Galerie Les Territoires in Montréal and teaches photography at Concordia University. She is represented by Patrick Mikhail Gallery in Ottawa.

Jessica Auer, Sublime Settlement

Jessica Auer, Sublime Settlement

Jessica Auer

Sublime Settlement,
Faroe Islands, 2011
Website – JessicaAuer.com

Jessica Auer is a documentary-style landscape photographer from Montréal. Drawing inspiration from history and archeology, her work is largely concerned the study of cultural sites. From the beaten track to the frontier, Jessica explores places where history and mythology are woven into the landscape, and where contemporary landscape issues emerge. She received her MFA in Studio Arts from Concordia University in 2007 and is the recipient of several grants and awards. Her work has been exhibited in Canada and the United States and is held in various private and public collections, including the Musée des Beaux Arts du Québec and the Canada Council Art Bank. Jessica is a co-founder and co-director of Galerie Les Territoires in Montréal and teaches photography at Concordia University. She is represented by Patrick Mikhail Gallery in Ottawa.

Exclusive: Magnum Emergency Fund Announces 2012 Grantees

The Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund has made an exclusive announcement to LightBox disclosing the winners of its 2012 grants. The fund, which began in 2009, awards the annual prize to photographers from around the world who use their cameras to shed light on underserved issues and communities.

This year’s winners are:

Evgenia Arbugaeva for
Tiksi, the Far North
Rena Effendi for
Capturing Coptic Life: Egypt’s Sectarian Struggle
Eric Gottesman for
Baalu Girma
Sebastian Liste for
The Brazilian Far West
Benjamin Lowy for
iLibya: Libya’s Growing Pains
Justin Maxon for
Murder That Goes Unsolved and Unheard
Donald Weber for
War is Good*
Paolo Woods for
Poor Rich

The eight grantees were selected from a field of nearly 100 photographers nominated by ten professionals (including, in the past, TIME’s own director of photography, Kira Pollack). The winners will receive, along with funding, editorial guidance and research support to continue their work, which explores such diverse topics as peasant works in China and violence in the Pennsylvania projects.

The Emergency Fund, which was founded to counteract the shrinking of opportunities for long-form, socially-conscious photographic storytellers, is now in its third year of granting prizes. The program continues to grow, says Emma Raynes, the Emergency Fund’s program director. “We’ve been able to put more energy into helping photographers put depth into their work,” she says. Increased integration of social media has also made a difference; the Emergency Fund had already used Kickstarter to add to its power to help photographers, but the organization has expanded its presence on Twitter, Facebook and Tumblr.

Raynes says that this year’s winners tended to step away from traditional documentary and photojournalism styles and put a new emphasis on creative visual language. Benjamin Lowy, for example, made use of the Hipstamatic iPhone app in his photographs of Libya. “We wanted to invest in projects that were incredibly ambitious,” says Raynes.

In addition to funding the work of established photojournalists, the Magnum Emergency Fund awards scholarships to emerging photographers from nonwestern countries, for them to attend a 5-week summer program about documenting human-rights issues.

The 2012 Human Rights Fellows are:

Poulomi Basu, 29, of India
Arthur Bondar, 28, of Ukraine
Liu Jie, 30, of China
Pooyan Tabatabaei, 28, of Iran

And for all its support of photographers, the Emergency Fund aims to do more than help them do their work. The Foundation wants “to reach beyond the photography community into communities that are concerned about the issues,” says Raynes. “The main goal of our program is to get the work seen.”

Read more about the Emergency Fund on LightBox here.

Submissions for Aphotostudent are Always Welcome

If you’re a photographer with a new body of work to show or if you’re a photography fan who has a new photo crush, you’re always welcome to submit it for posting on Aphotostudent. The majority of the posts on here for the past two years have showcased the work of world-renowned photographers. I’d like to devote more time to showcasing new work from emerging artists, but I need your help to do it.

Photo For The Week: Yamaguchi-san Peeling Chestnuts, 2008. James Luckett

Ways to reach me:

1: Feel free to email me at [email protected] but please write “aphotostudent submission” or something similar in the subject line so I don’t confuse it with the many requests for help I receive from Nigerian Royalty with millions of dollars stuck in limbo.

Please include a little bit about yourself and the body of work in the email. A bit of context always helps.

or

2: Head over to my Facebook page and post a comment on the most recent call for work.

Pretty simple!

Thank you in advance for any submissions you send. And, my apologies if I don’t reply to your submission right away. Sometimes emails stack up. It’s nothing personal.

I look forward to seeing lots of amazing work! – James Pomerantz

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