Tag Archives: Grange

The Grange Prize 2011

We are thrilled to announce that the Grange Prize 2011 will feature Indian and Canadian artists. The shortlist will be selected by a Canadian and Indian jury led by AGO curator Michelle Jacques who is joined by Wayne Baerwaldt, Director and Curator of exhibitions at the Alberta College of Art + Design in Calgary, artist and curator Sunil Gupta, and art critic and curator Gayatri Sinha, both based in New Delhi, India. minnesota . The 2011 nominees will be announced on August 30, the same day that the public can begin voting for their favourite artist and see the exhibition at the AGO. recycled drinking glasses . Foundation Repair .

And the winner of the Grange Prize is…

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Kristan Horton, from the Dr. Used Cars Denver . Strangelove series, 2003-2006

If you have not stopped in to the MoCP lately to see Kristan’s and the other three Grange Prize finalists’ work, it’s time to do so! Horton’s large Orbit pieces, Leslie’ Hewitt’s Riffs on Time, Josh Brand’s abstract works, and Moyra Davey’s Copperheads are all on view now, through December 22. Denver roofer . As curator (and Grange Prize judge) Karen Irvine explains, these four artists are “all very interested in creating a tension between photographic space and real space, and by abstracting and layering visual information they make us aware of our own act of looking, as well as our process of perception.” How will you perceive these works?

Read more from Karen’s Grange Prize Q and A and catch a discussion of contemporary photography with finalists on the Grange Prize site.

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Kristan Horton, Broadcast, 2007

Horton stars in three videos on the site too, including one in which he discusses the “Philosophical Itch.” Oooo!

See Kristan and the other three finalists’ work through Dec 22 at MoCP.

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And the winner is…

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On November 3rd at a public announcement in the AGO’s Walker Court, we announced that Canadian Kristan Horton had won the Grange Prize 2010. Used Cars Denver . Check back in the new year when will start announcing the details for the Grange Prize 2011!

And the winner of the Grange Prize is…

Thanks to your votes, Kristan Horton has won the $50,000 Grange Prize!

Congratulations Kristan!

horton_blog1.jpg
Kristan Horton, from the Dr. web application development services . repair foundation cracks . Strangelove series, 2003-2006

If you have not stopped in to the MoCP lately to see Kristan’s and the other three Grange Prize finalists’ work, it’s time to do so! Horton’s large Orbit pieces, Leslie’ Hewitt’s Riffs on Time, Josh Brand’s abstract works, and Moyra Davey’s Copperheads are all on view now, through December 22. Denver Fence Company . As curator (and Grange Prize judge) Karen Irvine explains, these four artists are “all very interested in creating a tension between photographic space and real space, and by abstracting and layering visual information they make us aware of our own act of looking, as well as our process of perception.” How will you perceive these works?

Read more from Karen’s Grange Prize Q and A and catch a discussion of contemporary photography with finalists on the Grange Prize site.

horton_blog2.jpg
Kristan Horton, Broadcast, 2007

Horton stars in three videos on the site too, including one in which he discusses the “Philosophical Itch.” Oooo!

See Kristan and the other three finalists’ work through Dec 22 at MoCP.

Grange Prize 2010 Panel Discussion (Audio)

The nominees for this year’s Grange Prize engage in a lively conversation about the current state of contemporary photography.

Moderated by Dr. Kenneth Montague, Independent Curator and Collector. affordable website design . http://www.outsourcing-cheap.com . Featuring artists Josh Brand, Moyra Davey, Leslie Hewitt and Kristan Horton.

Recorded: September 22, 2010 @ Jackman Hall, Art Gallery of Ontario
Duration: 1:10:29

Click to play:

Download 96 MB MP3

Q&A: Karen Irvine, Curator and Nominating Jury Member

Today, the Museum of Contemporary Photography at Columbia College, Chicago (MoCP) introduces Chicagoans to the work of the artists nominated for The Grange Prize 2010 with an exhibition celebrating this year’s shortlist. To acknowledge the opening, we spoke with MoCP curator Karen Irvine, also a member of this year’s nominating jury for The Grange Prize, about what to expect from the exhibition and the process of selecting the shortlist.

The Grange Prize: What was your criteria when you were thinking about who you wanted to be part of the shortlist?

Karen Irvine: I was really trying to find artists who are working in interesting conceptual ways and could use the sort of support that the prize can provide, and who would also potentially challenge the general public’s perception of what photography is, to push people out of their comfort zones, in a way, and ask them to consider what contemporary photography can be.

How important was it to you that all of the artists’ work play off each other’s in some way? Was the shortlist chosen as a group?

It was. The shortlist is a very deliberately curated group. Because we really needed to make sure that the artists could compete fairly. idahofoudation repair . There’s so much diversity in photography, and a documentary photographer is so radically different from somebody who’s working in an abstract or conceptual way, like our photographers are. We really felt that we wanted people to be compelled to learn about each photographer. Its important that all of the artists work similarly enough that people can’t simply vote for the type of photography they prefer, rather they have to become familiar with and then vote for the artist they prefer based on the content and ideas behind the artwork.

Do you think that people’s expectations, when they seek out a photography show or consider viewing a photography gallery in a museum, are typically for work that engages artful documentation?

I think, to a large extent, yes. We confront that a lot at the MoCP because our collection spans back to the 1930s, and people come in and really do want to come see a Walker Evans or a Garry Winogrand image, for example. Photography is so ubiquitous, and we see it every day, and that is primarily what it is used for, to report on the world. But it also does more than that, and for some artists, and for all of the artists on the shortlist, photography is used as a tool after or in tandem with experimentation with different mediums, approaches and strategies.

Can you talk a bit about what you’re planning for the exhibition at the MoCP? What it’ll look like, and what you’re planning for the space?

We have all four artists in the same gallery space, and each artist is represented by one body of work. They’ll be a couple of Kristan Horton’s large Orbit pieces, and three of Leslie Hewitt’s Riffs on Real Time, a small cluster of Josh Brand’s abstract works, and then a selection of Moyra Davey’s Copperheads.

What do you think is in store for the viewer?

Well, in some ways the artists’ practices are really diverse and it’s hard to draw parallels, but I would say that generally what each artist is up to isn’t totally obvious at first glance. florida web design . For the average viewer, their work will likely raise more questions than provide answers. If you look at Moyra Davey’s Copperheads you might be surprised by her choice of subject matter †why would somebody shoot pennies in this style, and what does this mean? I think that all of the artists are very interested in the photograph-as-object, and are raising questions that complicate our reading of their work. Even though each artist is working with two-dimensional imagery, I think that they’re all very interested in creating a tension between photographic space and real space, and by abstracting and layering visual information, they make us aware of our own act of looking, as well as our process of perception.

So are you going to vote?

Yes, of course!

Have you decided who you’re going to vote for?

No!

The MoCP’s exhibition of works by the four photographic artists nominated for The Grange Prize 2010 will be on view through December 22. For more information, visit http://www.mocp.org/exhibitions/2010/10/the_grange_priz.php.

Voting is Open for The Grange Prize 2010!

Starting today, you can cast your vote to decide who wins The Grange Prize 2010, honouring the best in international contemporary photography? Who will you choose? Josh Brand, Moyra Davey, Leslie Hewitt, or Kristan Horton? Visit thegrangeprize.com to view galleries of their work, watch artist videos, and vote for your favourite. The winner takes home $50,000 on November 3!


From left to right: (1) Moyra Davey (Canadian), Copperhead #77, 1990, chromogenic print, 51 x 61cm. Courtesy of the artist and Murray Guy, New York. © 2010 Moyra Davey (2) Kristan Horton, Canadian, Orbit: Dark Center, 2009, chromogenic print, 134.6 x 101.6 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Jessica Bradley Art + Projects, Toronto. ©2010 Kristan Horton (3) Josh Brand, American, Untitled, 2009, chromogenicprint, 24.4 x 20.3 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Herald St. London, UK. © 2010 Josh Brand (4) Leslie Hewitt, American, Riffs on Real Time (10 of 10), 2008, chromogenic print, 101.6 x 76.2 cm. golden root complex . Courtesy of the artist and D’Amelio Terras, New York. © 2010 Leslie Hewitt

The Grange Prize – Moyra Davey on Documentation and the Transition from Analog to Digital

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In the final video in The Grange Prize artist series, Moyra Davey reflects upon her artistic lineage and influences, and discusses the tension between digital and analog technologies. Take a look at the video, then visit thegrangeprize.com to view more and vote!