Tag Archives: Grand Prize

Several super success stories for photographer Michael Marten

Congratulations to British photographer Michael Marten. His remarkable new photobook Sea Change: A Tidal Journey Around Britain was just published by Kehrer Verlag. The book features diptychs taken from the same point during high tide and during low tide (often just 6 hours and 20 minutes apart).

He met his publisher last year at Lens Culture FotoFest Paris portfolio reviews. And, coincidentally, earlier in 2011, Marten won the Grand Prize in the Portfolio Category of the Lens Culture International Exposure Awards.

He also has a one-man show coming up at [email protected] in London on 26 September. Cheers!

marten-hightide.jpg

marten-lowtide.jpg

© Michael Marten, from his series, and new book, Sea Change.
Salmon fishery, Solway Firth, Galloway. 27 and 28 March 2006.
Low water 5.20 pm, high water 12 noon.

YOU can still enter your photographs and multimedia to win one of Lens Culture International Exposure Awards 2012: lensculture.com/awards. Deadline is September 16, 2012.

AND you can still register for portfolio reviews in Paris (November 12-13-14, 2012): fotofest-paris.com.

Great work deserves to be seen all around the world!

Inside the World of Turkish Oil Wrestling

The sport ofyal gre, or oil wrestling,is at the heart ofKrkpnar, afestival in the Turkish city of Edirne. Thousands of people will come to see these wrestlersslick with olive oilcompete in the 651stannual games on July 2. Itll be a familiar sight for Turkish photographer Pari Dukovic, who attended the event in 2010 and 2011.

I saw that the sport had an Old World charm to itthe festival, the prayers, the music, the instruments, the outfits, says Pari, who used to watch the festivals coverage as a teenager. I am drawn to subject matter that makes you feel as though you are traveling through time andKrkpnarfascinated me with its history and how it has remained an integral part of Turkish culture.

As the festival begins, drum and horn players parade through the city with the sports grand prizethe Krkpnar Golden Belt. The community then meets in the grand 16thcentury Selimiye Mosque, where the imam gives a sermon in honor of competitors past and present.For the young boys participating in the traditional Turkish coming-of-age ceremony known asSunnet Dugunu, its desirable to celebrate it at the same time asKrkpnar, as the festival represents to many the ultimate in male achievement. The boy in the mosque in slide #10 wears the ornate cape associated with the ritual.

After the sermon, wrestlers pray at the graves of legendary sportsmen and proceed through the streets to the competition field, singing the national anthem. The master of ceremony introduces the wrestlers to the audience, reciting their names, titles and skills in verse. Cheap Digital Cable TV . Very few of the wrestlers, who range widely in age, make a living from the sport. Nevertheless, Pari says hegot the clear sense that being a part of this event is a dream come true for them. They train for a whole year and often travel from villages all over Turkey to participate, so becoming aKrkpnarwrestler is an achievement they take great pride in, he says.The wrestlers, wearing nothing but short leather trousers, get rubbed down with olive oil. This makes the goal of the matchto throw ones opponent on his backall the more difficult. The matches last about 30 minutes each, while the final bout can last up to two exhausting hours.

I think the dedication that goes into what they do is amazing, says Pari. I hope that my photographs stand as visual documents of this tradition and that my respect is captured in these images.

Pari Dukovic is a New York City based documentary photographer. See more of his work here.

Barbara Cole

I met Barbara Cole a number of years ago at Review Santa Fe and I became an immediate fan of her work and person.  She was (and is) from Toronto and working as an editorial and fine art photographer, producing the majority of her work underwater. Her projects not only made an impression at the reviews, but have been celebrated all over the world in both arenas. Barbara was awarded  the Grand Prize, the 6ème Festival International de la Photographie de Mode in Cannes, France, her work has been exhibited in numerous solo exhibitions in galleries and museums, and now can be found as a beautiful, hardcover book.  
The monograph, Barbara Cole, is 110 pages of painterly photographs, with essays by Jeanne Beker and Sara Angel. Barbara will be having a book launch and artist signing at BAU-XI Photo this Thusday, June 28th. Please contact Rosie or Julie at BAU-XI Photo via e-mail ([email protected]) if you would like to pre-order a book.
The book represents four different bodies of work – united by one
thing- water. The first series, titled Underworld was fairly instinctual. I’ve been a swimmer all of my
life and it just seemed natural to build a bridge between my career in
photography and my love of water. 
Barbara will also be opening an exhibition, Two People Walking on a Tightrope in an Ordinary Life Full of Extraordinary Moments, tonight a the Galerie Le Royer in Montreal, Canada.
While Underworld was more meditative and calm, the second series, White Noise is about the disturbance of a body moving through water.  Chromatics was inspired by the colour field painters of the fifties, (Rothko and Frankenthaler) and added unusual colours that were not usually identified with underwater work. I flattened the perspective by shooting from above and the figures were instructed to move in front of the camera as if they were paint on a brush. 
The last body is, Two People Walking A Tightrope In An Ordinary Life Full of Extraordinary Moments. My inspiration was dance and in particular the words of George Balanchine. “Don’t express your inner feelings show me what they look like.” 

Hyères 2011

I’ve just recently returned from the 2011 edition of the Hyères fashion and photography festival which takes place at the Villa Noailles. For those who are not familiar with Hyères (I was not until a couple of years ago) it’s important to note the use of the word “and” between ‘fashion’ and ‘photography’. This is not a fashion photography festival but a festival with two distinct parts. Given that I know next-to-nothing about fashion photography and possibly even less about fashion itself, I wasn’t sure what to expect, but I came back genuinely energised.

Hyères doesn’t have the same visibility as the Rencontres d’Arles and in fairness the festival takes place on a much more intimate scale than the vast sprawl of it’s cousin from up the road. Whereas a lot of the work being presented in Arles is well-known and critically recognised, Hyères functions more like a photographic incubator, both by focusing the competition on emerging young talent and also by exhibiting work that you are unlikely to see elsewhere. For instance the 2011 festival included a selection of Erwin Blumenfeld’s photographs all of which were used as Vogue covers, something you are unlikely to see in a photography museum. After seeing this show and stepping into a newsagents, I couldn’t help feeling that fashion photography as a genre seems to have regressed hugely from the inventiveness and experimentation of Blumenfeld’s era, particularly for established magazines like Vogue.

Anouk Kruithof, The Daily Exhaustion

Anouk Kruithof, The Daily Exhaustion

The core of the photography component of the festival is a group exhibition of a shortlist of 10 emerging photographers, one or several of whom are selected by a jury for a grand prize. A look back at the shortlisted photographers from previous festivals and you are guaranteed to find not only excellent and exciting work and a lot of genuine discoveries. This year was no different, with work by Andrey Bogush, Kim Boske, Emily Hyperion Dubuisson, Katarina Elvén, Anouk Kruithof, Ina Jang, Mårten Lange, Marie Queau, Awoiska van der Molen and Marc Philip van Kempen. Most of the short-listed photographers  have no experience of fashion photography at all and, in addition to the grand prize, a few of them may find themselves trying their hand at it for the first time following Hyères, an exercise which I think would be fascinating for any emerging photographer.

This year’s grand prize winner was the young Dutch photographer Anouk Kruithof. She was selected unanimously by the jury for her inventiveness and her versatility. The series she presented at Hyères, the Daily Exhaustion, is a wonderfully simple idea in an equally wonderfully simple book/zine form, but I also recommend a trip to her website which is full of interesting material. A special mention was also given to Katarina Elvén, a set designer from Sweden who is working on a an ambitious but very thoughtful project relating to surface and aesthetics… one to look out for in the future. I also made another discovery in Hyères, but this one was on the jury rather than the shortlist. Fellow jury member and a photographer, provocateur and penseur, Jason Evans: the man behind the Daily Nice, the New Scent, the terrific Words Without Pictures and much more.

Jury deliberations

Jury deliberations

One particularly refreshing aspect of the festival is the time that is allocated to see each photographer. Portfolio reviews, which appear to be becoming more and more popular, seldom offer more than 20 minutes per review whereas at Hyères jurors spend between anything between 30 minutes and 1h30 with each of the shortlisted photographers, almost enough time for a conversation. But the thing that really makes Hyères stand out from other photography festivals is that it creates a space to consider photography in a different context. Just by combining fashion and photography, the festival is forcing us to reconsider what we think of as photography and offering a reminder of how insular the ‘fine art photography’ world can be. Whether you like fashion photography (or any other applied photography for that matter) or not, it has to be recognised that it is too often dismissed as inferior or just plain ignored by the art photography world. During my four days in Hyères I found myself having more conversations about photography in its many different forms than I have at all the other photography festivals I have attended put together.

Aside from these issues of substance, combine the fact that this all takes place in an absolutely gorgeous 1930s modernist villa on the Mediterranean and and that being on photo-jury duty also involves a collective swim in the Mediterranean and you will understand why Hyères has immediately become a personal favourite.

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– Announcing the 29th Annual College Photography Contest

Photographer’s Forum Magazine and Nikon will host the 29th Annual College Photography Contest. All contest finalists will be published in the 2009 Best of Photography Annual and the winning photos will be published in the May 2009 issue of Photographer’s Forum and entered into the Nikon Emerging Photographers Hall of Fame.

Breakdown of the prizes are as follows:

FIRST PLACE GRAND PRIZE:

$2,000 grant from Nikon and Photographer’s Forum PLUS Nikon D80 digital SLR camera and lens system (or equivalent)

SECOND PLACE:

$1,000 grant from Nikon and Photographer’s Forum PLUS Nikon D80 digital SLR camera and lens system (or equivalent)

THIRD PLACE:

$500 cash grant

FOURTH PLACE PRIZES:

Five $50 grants

100 Honorable Mentions:

All Honorable Mentions will be listed in the May 2009 issue of Photographer�s Forum magazine and will receive a gold embossed certificate of outstanding merit from Photographer�s Forum.

The contest is open to all high school and college students in the United States, Canada, and around the world. The early entry deadline is October 20, and the final deadline is November 20.