Tag Archives: Good Fortune

Christopher Churchill, Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.

Christopher Churchill, Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.

Christopher Churchill

Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.,
Ponca City, Oklahoma, 2009
Website – ChristopherChurchill.com

Christopher Churchill (b. 1977) works as a fine art and commissioned photographer based in New England. His photographs are held in various permanent collections that include The Corcoran Gallery of Art, The Center for Creative Photography, The High Museum of Art, The J. Paul Getty Museum, MFA Boston, MFA Houston, The Museum of Contemporary Photography and The Smithsonian. His first monograph American Faith, was published in 2012 by Nazraeli Press and the Joy of Giving Something. In 2010 he was named to the Critical Mass top 50. He had had the good fortune of working with a variety of clients that include Budweiser, Businessweek, Esquire, Fast Co., Inc., GQ, Liberty Mutual, Newsweek, NYTimes Magazine, Stern, Time, Travel & Leisure, Salvation Army and PBS. He lives outside of Boston with his wife and two daughters.  

Christopher Churchill, Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.

Christopher Churchill, Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.

Christopher Churchill

Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.,
Ponca City, Oklahoma, 2009
Website – ChristopherChurchill.com

Christopher Churchill (b. 1977) works as a fine art and commissioned photographer based in New England. His photographs are held in various permanent collections that include The Corcoran Gallery of Art, The Center for Creative Photography, The High Museum of Art, The J. Paul Getty Museum, MFA Boston, MFA Houston, The Museum of Contemporary Photography and The Smithsonian. His first monograph American Faith, was published in 2012 by Nazraeli Press and the Joy of Giving Something. In 2010 he was named to the Critical Mass top 50. He had had the good fortune of working with a variety of clients that include Budweiser, Businessweek, Esquire, Fast Co., Inc., GQ, Liberty Mutual, Newsweek, NYTimes Magazine, Stern, Time, Travel & Leisure, Salvation Army and PBS. He lives outside of Boston with his wife and two daughters.  

Rodrigo Rodrich

I’ve had the good fortune of hanging out a couple of times with the photographer/correspondent in Iquitos for El Comercio, a major newspaper based in Lima. His name is Rodrigo Rodrich and he maintains a great blog with up-to-date work of his stories and freelance jobs here in the Amazon.

Rodrigo Rodrich – Los Maijunas

Loretta Ayeroff

I often think that we create work at such a fast pace, that we really don’t have time to revisit and digest the plethora of images in our photo reserves. Loretta Ayeroff has recently had the good fortune of revisiting her work from the early 1980’s, finding a new audience and fresh appreciation for imagery that is 30 years old. The work is being celebrated in the new exhibition, Backyard Oasis: The Swimming Pool in Southern California Photography, 1945-1982 in the Annenberg Wing of the Palm Springs Art Museum. Four of her images from her project, Motel Series, are being featured in company along with image makers such as Sim Arrons, Diane Arbus, John Divola, David Hockney, Bill Owens, Ed Ruscha, and Garry Winogrand.

Loretta is a former editorial photographer, having worked for the Los Angeles Times, New West, and Westways magazines, amongst other publications. She has taught photography since 1983, at UCLA Extension and Otis College of Art+Design, the Continuing Education Dept., where she also ran the AFA Photography Certificate Program for several years. Currently, Loretta teaches digital photography at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

These delicious color images from The Motel Series were captured on Kodachrome Slide Film, 64 ASA, using an Olympus XA Camera.

Carson Sanders

Carson Sanders has had the good fortune be educated on two continents at the same school. He spent last year at Savannah College of Art and Design’s Hong Kong campus and is now back at the Savannah, GA campus working towards his BFA. Born in Dallas, Texas, Carson is an editor at aint-bad magazine, a quarterly art journal focusing on images that discuss human existence, culture, and contemporary issues. Carson is continuing to document the south and is about to take a road trip across the lower half of the U.S.

I am featuring two bodies of work he produced in China, Yuen Po Street Bird Marketand Happy Valley Racecourse.

Yuen Po Street Bird Market: The Yuen Po Street Bird Market located in Prince Edward is a place that I grew accustomed to during the ten weeks that I spent in Hong Kong in the Fall of 2011. Witnessing the love that these men and women have for their birds is something that I never thought I would come across while studying abroad. For me, this body of work transcribes the beauty that can often go un-noticed when passing through the heavily congested market.

One must stop and watch, as these men do each day, to understand why these creatures mean so much to this culture as a whole. Men spend hours staring past the bars of the cages and into the souls of these birds; as if they are trying to understand exactly what it is that these little creatures are doing here on this planet. This question may go unanswered for hundreds of years, but the men will keep staring, day after day.

Happy Valley Racecourse is located in Wan Chai, Hong Kong and is completely surrounded by skyscrapers. Standing inside the complex is surreal as you look in each direction and see tall buildings all around with a clearing in the middle for a grass track. Men and women flock to the horse races that take place on Wednesdays and Sundays. For some, this is the only excitement that they will have all week. For others, it’s a chance to finally make it big on a winning ticket. Regardless of why; they come. And they come each night, each week, and sit in the stands, or in the indoor sections, watching small televisions mounted on walls. They are all watching to see if the horse that they chose will make them a winner.

As the horses round the final corner, the noise is almost too much to handle. Screaming and shouting at a television set that has no control over the outcome of the race is common practice at Happy Valley. The winners are known immediately and can be heard from almost anywhere in the stadium. Their eyes fill with tears of joy as they proceed to the counter to collect their winnings. The losers can be heard as well, but it’s a different sound. They are not shouting with joy but rather cursing with anger. And while walking to the counter, they aren’t smiling, but rather fidgeting for coins and other money that can be spent on another race, another chance to have a better tomorrow.

Breaking Boundaries: Manjari Sharma’s Darshan

I realize we’ve had a bit of a hiatus lately over here on TPP, but I’m pulled out of retirement by some really staggering work by Manjari Sharma. In this age of instagram, it’s rare to see something truly new and groundbreaking, especially as it pertains to the photographic medium itself.

Enter Manjari Sharma’s Darshan. Named for a Sanskrit word which means “sight”, “vision” or “view, Manjari’s new project seeks to photographically recreate nine classical images of Hindu Gods and Goddesses. These icons are deeply connected to Sharma’s spiritual upbringing. By melding them with her reverence and devotion to photography, she is creating altars of her own.

You’ll never believe what goes into making these images. It’s a full-on production of costume designers, set stylists, jewelry designers, carpenters and painters. Sharma believes art is much about the process, and this is one hell of a process.

This is the first image, Maa Laxmi, the goddess of wealth, good fortune, and prosperity.

Here is more about the project, and an amazing behind-the-scenes look at the work as it is created:

Darshan from Manjari Sharma on Vimeo.

PLEASE consider donating to Sharma’s project. These images ought to be created. Click here and help out! You can even receive a signed, editioned print. Totally worth it, this is an excellent use of Kickstarter.

Here is more from Sharma in her own words:

“I grew up in a Hindu home to parents who were quite spiritual, religious and god fearing as they would call it in India. I visited countless temples, shrines, and discourses as frequently as my parents wanted. These discourses circled around unraveling the mysteries locked in chapters of mythological enigma and tales of deities, reincarnations and astrology. The roots of hindu mythology run deep; my own experiences as a child ranged from being fascinated and enlightened to lost and still seeking. Naturally, coming back home still consists of delving back into the same routine of worship and meditation I left behind.

I moved from India to the United States in 2001 in order to pursue an undergraduate study in Fine Art Photography. The frequency with which I visited Hindu temples in what felt like my previous life, gradually got replaced with visits to art galleries, museums and studios, where creativity in all mediums of expression are revered.

This series bridges two parts of my world. Iconography in the Indian religion found in temples and scriptures are ultimately artistic representations of mythological characters. Most hindus have seen the use of painting and sculpture but rarely photography taken to the level of exacting measures with respect to showcasing deities. The creation of these images has become my act of devotion, to art and to religion.”

Go to Manjari Sharma’s site.

Go to Kickstarter and be inspired.