Tag Archives: Gesture

Brighton Photo Fringe 2012 – Blind Field presents Origins of Encounter until 21 October

Blind Field are showing Origins of Encounter at the Phoenix Brighton until Sunday 21 October as part of the Brighton Fringe 2012. The artists involved are Joan Alexander, Luke AR Hamblin and Louise Maher, all of whom, according to the press release, “examine notions of the encounter in relation to place, narrative and the photograph”.

© Joan Alexander – Study V – Facing North Window – 60 Minutes

Joan Alexander
“Alexander’s work explores the margins of inscription and projection, the unacknowledged spectra between positive and negative. Alexander is interested in the ‘latent image’. A visual in waiting, from between times, like the line between shadow and light; the line, like a map, is always a metaphor. Alexander’s practice immerses the viewer within a passage of time through an encounter with the movement and interruption of light. Her projections create a space where the viewer must pass through lines of light drawing attention to their presence. The correlation between printed and projected material asks for a closer examination creating awareness to the tangible and intangible nature of her practice.”

© Luke AR Hamblin – A study of still life. Sunflowers

Luke AR Hamblin
“Hamblin is interested in the way in which photography enables us to dissect the world and pull it apart. For Hamblin making photographic pictures is about assembling a Cast of characters, analysing their poses, placing them in the picture frame. Hamblin has developed a complex process of picture-making, exploring the role of perception and portrayal in our engagement with ‘place’. His series Studies for a theory of the Epic Photograph encourages us to think about how simple aspects of pose and gesture can embody whole narrative worlds. Drawing on references from early twentieth century modes of portrayal: theatre, cinema and painting, Hamblin’s photographs offer the viewer undisclosed narratives to decipher and re-construct.”

© Louise Maher – Old Head, Kinsale 2006-2012

Louise Maher
“Maher’s practice concentrates upon the inextricable relationship we have to our environment. By focusing on everyday expressions of this connection, she explores perceptions of the encounter. Maher’s approach stems from an appreciation of the historical development of street photography, yet it is also influenced by a typological approach. She values the photograph’s capacity to simultaneously document and picture the world. Her photographic series’ unite aspects of spontaneity and formalization to create a visual language that presents the viewer with space to translate.” From the press release.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Festivals, Photography Shows Tagged: Blind Field, brighton, Brighton Photo Fringe, Joan Alexander, Louise Maher, Luke AR Hamblin, Origins of Encounter, photo show

Medium Festival: Jamie Johnson

Featuring photographers seen at the Medium Photography Festival in San Diego….
Once in a while, a photographer has that light bulb moment, where they see something in their work they never noticed before, and then they see it again and again and all of a sudden they realize that, without their knowledge, they’ve been building a body of work–in the case of Los Angeles photographer, Jamie Johnson, quite a profound body of work at that.
I’ve known Jamie for many years and she’s the hardest working photographer I know.  Jamie has a family and children portrait business that keeps her busy seven days a week, year round, but one month out of every year, she explores a part of the world, often on her own, where she leaves the “platinum pacifiers of Bel Air” behind and refreshes her appreciation of humanity.
She has won awards from Prix De La Photographie Paris , Women in Photography International, the Gold Award at Color Magazine and shown at The Fowler Museum in Los Angeles, amongst many exhibitions across the country and online. 
One World 

I cover many terrains as a photographer. I work as an editorial and portrait photographer with an emphasis on family and children portraiture, I am drawn to the simple quality of just being in the world. A simple passion that lured me to travel around the globe and I make work as a way of exploring other cultures. With no particular direction, my two worlds suddenly became one. It started with an instant of recognition, of familiarity of a gesture, an expression, or a person, and I began to see that we are much more one world, than individuals. 

I began to see clearly that we are all experiencing the same joy, the same sorrow, the same routines, the same commitment to family and I began to see the universality of being human. My series, One World, features two photographs, captured years apart without any connection to the other image. The surprising similarities within images that I have been creating over the years, speaks a powerful truth and lesson about who we are.

High and Low: Jim Goldberg’s Works in Process

Although a photographers process is integral to his/her work, it is often a carefully guarded secret. Most photographers tend to keep the development of their work to themselves, sometimes choosing to seek counsel only from a small circle of trusted friends.

It comes as a surprise, then, to find Magnum photographer Jim Goldbergs reworked sketches, videos and maquettes of his groundbreaking books openly shared online.

For Goldberga photographer whose approach has always been eclectic, evolving, and utilizing other mediums, including textthe very act of sharing these works in progress is an important and formative part of the final product.

Goldberg talked to LightBox about the process of revisiting, sharing and republishing two of his groundbreaking works. Rich and Poor (1977-85) juxtaposes two economic classes through intimate environmental portraits and personal statements written on the prints by the subjects, while Raised by Wolves (1985-95) documents the lives of homeless runaways in San Francisco and Los Angeles through photographs, text, drawings and interviews.

Being a teacher for so long, Ive realized that so much of what you teach students is about learning to respect the importance of process. Watching students grow is interestingand them observing my process helps them see that its not that mysterious of a thing to do. In order to figure this artmaking stuff out, its trial and error and experimentation, and takes some time and hard thinking. Putting work out in many forms and stages is an extension of how I see things. I feel the art process is best served when it invites comments and constructive criticism from people. Its a strategic gesture, too, because the feedback I receive helps me move forward with my ideas, which is what process is aboutto craft and evolve something.

Rich and Poor

I was invited by Steidl to republish Rich and Poor. Up to this point my archive was mostly analog. proveedor factura electrnica . Revisiting Rich and Poor meant that it was time to start digitizing my older work. I started by going through all of my contact sheets and re-editing. My studio ended up scanning a lot of images that were never printed in the original book, which in turn gave me a way to experience my old work with a beginners mind. This got me excited about seeing things I had passed over years before during my original edit. When I originally made the work, I was getting so much positive feedback about how I was using images with text that the stand-alone images fell by the wayside. Or perhaps back then I didnt have the courage to include images that functioned simply as straight photographs.

Revisiting the archive excited me on many levels. The freshness of my youth particularly resonated with me, but it also gave me thirty years of distance to look back at these images. Aside from the overall nostalgic patina, I feel like I was looking at these images with a critical distance for the first time. Im now able to separate my own impulses with the overarching history/context of what was happening in the 70s and 80s.

I also wanted to conceptually tie the past in with the present and so decided to revisit a few of the original subjects and map where they are today. I plan to include this in the new Rich and Poor edition via a small insert of contemporary imagery.

Raised by Wolves

Raised by Wolves has been out of print for some time, which has made it expensive and difficult to findso people are constantly asking me for it. Its also been almost 20 years since the book was published, so I felt it would be a good time to put it back on the table as something to look at again, as well as digitize.

Raised by Wolves was a good ten years of working with the kids; collecting ephemera;and making the exhibition and the book.

Still when it came time for the book and exhibition to be produced, and all the deadlines were mounting, aesthetic choices had to be made quickly as to what would be included and what was to go back into boxes. So there was a lot that hasnt been looked at since.

My studio manager and I started brainstorming on strategies to get the work out there again, and we decided that the best way would be to make something to put up on my website.

So we took a new intern to the studiowho happened to be a production whizzand had him organize and digitize everything. I gave him some guidance and checked in with him often on we had had discovered on that particular day, but for the most part gave him free reign as to what could be explored and organized.

Based on what I was witnessing on the streets, I knew that I needed to record what I was experiencing in ways that just couldnt be done with the camera alone. I have, since the beginning of my career, used text, video, audio, Polaroids, found objects, and ephemera. With Raised by Wolves it was my first attempt to incorporate all these various approaches into one project.

Raised by Wolves,video by Jim Goldberg

The children in Raised by Wolves were living hard liveslives that were leading to nowhere. So now, when I reheard a recording that the intern (Brandon) had found in some box, and I heard the voice of lets say Tweeky Dave, well that added something that would extend to the viewers experience of the project.

Its always good to find things that you havent found before. Im not doing it because I have nothing else to do or because Im old and I may as well go back into my archive. Im going back into my archive with purposeto see what I can reinvent. Im still vibrant and making new work. directory submission . The making of the new work guides how the old work looks.

Beyond Rich and Poor and Raised by Wolves, Goldberg is revisiting and re-imagining other projects from his archive. A previously unpublished series titled Coming and Going is being reworked as a series of Japanese small books. Goldberg is also reevaluating and reworking Open See, the project for which he was given the Henri Cartier-Bresson Award in 2007 and the Duestche Borse Award in 2011. Goldberg plans a new edition that will be more expansive than the original, one that will further explain the complexities of the situationof immigration, being a refugee and being trafficked in a place and time. Working roughs for the proposed book and multimedia sketches for the project again are available online. Goldberg says of his process Its always good to find things that you havent found before and Im going back into my archive with purposeto see what I can reinvent. Im still vibrant and making new work. The making of the new work guides how the old work looks.

Photographer/Artist Jim Goldberg is a member of Magnum Photos and Professor of Art at the California College of Arts and Crafts. He Lives in San Francisco.

The Six Shooters

About six months ago, I was out to lunch with a group of photographer friends: Nancy Baron, Noelle Swan Gilbert, Cat Gwynn, Heidi Lender, Ashly Stohl and me.  Over the course of the meal we discussed all the usual photographic topics and also talked about the desire to have fun with photography again, something that gets lost in the onslaught of competitions and reviews.  So we decided to create a site, The Six Shooters, assigning ourselves each a day (I am Friday), where we respond to the image from the day before–so each Friday, I am responding to Heidi Lender’s Thursday image who is responding to Cat Gwynn’s Wednesday image who is responding to Noelle Swan Gilbert’s Tuesday image who is responding to Nancy Baron’s Monday image who is responding to Ashly Stohl’s Saturday image and so on and so on.

Our goal is to express Six points of view, over Six days, creating a thread of visual connections whether it be through subject, color, light, or gesture, leading the viewer on a photographic journey–a visual train, so to speak, with each image dependent on the one in front and the one behind to make the engine operate and stay on track. We do not create work for the site, instead mine our archives and use work that sometimes otherwise never sees the light of day.  It’s also inspired us to create random images, outside of the “project” template.

We are thrilled to announce our first exhibition, featuring five weeks, 30 images, at the Seaver Gallery at the Marlborough School in Los Angeles, opening September 5th and running though October 9th. You can check out the site here, and follow us on Facebook here!

I am featuring a few weeks of images to give you an idea of the concept.
 image by Nancy Baron
 Image by Noelle Swan Gilbert

 image by Cat Gwynn

 image by Heidi Lender

image by Aline Smithson

 image by Ashly Stohl

image by Nancy Baron
 Image by Noelle Swan Gilbert
 image by Cat Gwynn

 image by Heidi Lender

image by Aline Smithson

image by Ashly Stohl

I-Hsuen Chen

Brooklyn photographer, I-Hsuen Chen, was born in Taipei, Taiwan. He is a photographer, video artist, and performer. He received his Masters of Fine Art in Photography from Pratt Institute in New York, and a BA in Advertising & Public Relations at Fu Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan. I-Hsuen has an road trip series, Nowhere in Taiwan, that combines humor, reality, and the idea inconsequential places in his native Taiwan. I am also intrigued by his video, I Know. The power of the piece lies in what is not heard and the poignancy lies in the listener’s reaction.

I Know, 2011: I always need to be understood. So I wrote 100 personal things about myself, reading them in front of my friend. I videotaped their responses to all my intimate secret. At the moment, we were all vulnerably synchronized. The video documentation allows viewers to experience the whole-hearted moment, almost as if hearing a friend saying: “I know.”

I know #3 from ihsuenchen on Vimeo.

Nowhere in Taiwan is a selection of photographs made while traveling through my native country of Taiwan in the summer of 2011.

Influenced by the idea of the “road trip” in American photography, exemplified in the work of such photographers as Robert Frank, Stephen Shore, and Joel Sternfield, I set out to find scenes and situations that seem to be “in between,” neither landscape nor cityscape but existing in an ambiguous space I call “nowhere.” Some of these sites are suburban, or partly urbanized, or abandoned and left behind. The aspect of location that interests me most has to do with the traces of human presence and gesture that reside or remain. In search of nowhere, I look for unexpected instances of intimacy, so that there is a sense of “nowhere” being unveiled.

Aline Smithson: Converging Conversations

Sharing a work-in-progress series titled, Converging Conversations. I tend to make work that tells stories, but I have been also shooting images that are non-specific, more about color or gesture or emotion–I have been thinking about those moments when you are lost in thought, yet not really thinking about anything…

Converging Conversations is a series about juxtaposing unrelated images in order to create a new conversation or narrative. It is a conversation that is a convergence of ideas and associations, open to personal interpretation. The result is something completely separate from the original intent of the image making.

My initial focus in creating many of these photographs was to capture a sense of disconnectedness, a sense of day dreaming, and in some cases, a sense of nothingness–images that capture moments or gestures, moving back and forth between a place that is tangible and a place on the periphery of my memory and experience. By combining these images, a new narrative begins and the photographs become animated in conversation.

Milena Bonilla – Transitory Map

The last post on Bruno Dubner reminded me of work I saw by Colombian artist Milena Bonilla. I first discovered her work about a year ago when, upon arriving in Bogotá, I googled “contemporary columbian photography” and found her name on a list of people exhibited at a show in England a few years ago.

Milena Bonilla – Transitory Map

I liked this work called Transitory Map and she describes it thus on her site:

The project consists in to take randomly several buses in Bogotá city and to sew the holes that appeared on the damaged seats. (seats are made of foam and synthetic leather or fabric). The size of the hole defines the time used to travel along the city sewing the damaged seat. After finishing the tour, the path taken is transferred to a map, using as a convention the same thread color as the one used to sew the seat. During the whole project twenty five tours were made from which there are sixteen documented.

I’m really taken with the simple beauty of the photos; their color scheme and soft lighting. The gesture, too, is symbolic of healing and alludes to the country’s violent past (and present).

Milena Bonilla – Transitory Map

Milena Bonilla – Transitory Map

Juan Fernando Herrán – Campo Santo

Juan Fernando Herrán is a sculptor who occasionally does projects involving photography. Campo Santo is a body of work documenting an area of simple crosses. The crosses are hidden in a patch of forest and are made with simple materials found on site. They are made as a remembrance of area residents killed in Colombia’s violence. Making a cross out of two sticks is a very simple but also very powerful sculptural gesture.

Juan Fernando Herrán – Campo Santo

Juan Fernando Herrán – Campo Santo