Tag Archives: George Eastman

Frederic Weber, Ab Ovo

Frederic Weber, Ab Ovo

Frederic Weber

Ab Ovo,
, 2012
From the Gravitas series
Website – FredericWeber.net

Frederic Weber lives and works in Nyack, New York. His photographs have been reproduced in publications including Art + Auction, Aperture, Flash Art, The New Yorker, The New York Times and more recently, The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the W.M. Hunt Collection (Aperture, 2011). Weber’s artworks are represented in several museum collections, including the Whitney Museum of American Art, the George Eastman House, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Museum of Fine Arts Houston, as well as many private collections such as Manfried Heiting, Bill Hunt and Fred Bidwell.

Andy Freeberg, Sean Kelly, Art Basel Miami, Artist: Kehinde Wiley

Andy Freeberg, Sean Kelly, Art Basel Miami, Artist: Kehinde Wiley

Andy Freeberg

Sean Kelly, Art Basel Miami, Artist: Kehinde Wiley,
, 2010
From the Art Fare series
Website – AndyFreeberg.com

Andy Freeberg was born in New York City where he learned at an early age to be a critical observer of the world and the people in it. He studied at the University of Michigan, began his career as a photojournalist and now concentrates primarily on fine art projects. Freeberg has recently emerged on the contemporary art scene as a wry commentator on the art industry itself. Long fascinated with the gallery and museum worlds, he often turns his camera on the dealers, gallery patrons, artists, museum guards, and their interplay with the works of art on view. His project Guardians, about the women that guard the art in Russian museums, won Photolucida’s Critical Mass book award and was published in 2010. The Guardians will be on view at the Cantor Museum at Stanford University through January 2013. His series, Art Fare, documenting another side of the art world, will open at Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles in September 2012. Freeberg’s work is in many public and private collections including the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, The Portland Art Museum, the George Eastman House, and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston.

Robert Herman: The New Yorkers

Brooklyn born photographer, Robert Herman began working as an usher at a movie theater owned
by his parents. The exposure to a wide range of films during his formative
years provided him with a unique vision: “Working for my father allowed me to
view the same movie repeatedly,” he recalls, “until the story line began to
recede and the images became independent of the narrative.” 



Robert received a BFA in film making from the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University and received his Masters in Digital Photography from the School of Visual Arts in NYC.  Later as a production still photographer on
independent feature films, Herman discovered the life at the periphery of film
locations was more compelling than the film sets. His book of his NYC color street photographs, The New Yorkers, to be self-published in the fall of 2013 with help from a successful Kickstarter campaign. His is currently also working with Fractured Atlas to defray additional costs and accepting additional tax deductible donations.
His work is part of the permanent collections of the George
Eastman House and the Telfair Museum in Savannah, GA. His photographs are also
in many private collections and has exhibited across the United States including
the Museum of Modern Art, the galleries of the Savannah College of Art &
Design, The Los Angeles Center for Digital Art and The Henry Gregg Gallery in
DUMBO. This spring, photographs from The
New Yorkers
were included in a traveling exhibition that originated at the
Istanbul Photography Museum, and then moved to Ankara, Turkey with more venues
to be announced in the coming months.

The New Yorkers

New
York City is like a diamond mine. The pressure will turn one into coal dust or
a multi-faceted jewel. To survive with some sort of evolving grace, it is
absolutely essential to cultivate a Zen-like awareness. Consciously choosing to
be in a state of openness is also useful for making photographs. To paraphrase
the art critic John Berger: A photograph that surprises the photographer when
he makes it, in turn surprises the viewer. No matter how hardened and cynical
one becomes, the act of taking a picture, forces one to try to return to an
innocent wonder. Every time I go out to make photographs, I ask myself this
question: Can I see the world with vulnerability and clarity?

The
New Yorkers is a body of work that I began when I was still a student at NYU,
when I was learning to be a photographer. I was living in Little Italy at the
time and everyone around me seemed to be a subject: the man who changed tires,
the superintendent of the building next door.  I discovered Harry Callahan’s magnificent book: Color and
Robert Frank’s The Americans. These images opened my mind to what a strong
photograph could be. If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, then this
was my starting point. Both of these photographers re-made the mundane, the
ordinary and the everyday and transformed them into small and transcendent
jewels.

Over
the years, I lived in several different apartments and I continued making pictures
in whatever neighborhood I happened to be living in. Becoming comfortable in my
new surroundings would ease the way for me to make the authentic photographs I
was seeking. Key to this body of work was letting the subject matter determine
the outcome. I would make myself available, allowing my intuition to be my guide
and let the content rise to the surface. The true epiphany was not to embellish
or to judge: with the removal of the internal impediment strong subject matter
would speak for itself. Like a man searching for water in the desert with a
dousing rod, I became a vessel and allowed the images to pass through me onto
the film.

As an illustration of this, “Eldorado” was made
on a day when I was sitting around my loft with my girl friend at the time when
suddenly I said, “ I’ll be right back, I have to go out and take some
pictures.” Ann nodded her ascent and with my Nikon F in hand, I walked around
the corner onto Mulberry Street. 
In the bright afternoon sun two luxury cars were parked angling in from
the street towards a large green garage door. I chose my framing just as two
boys walked into the shot and I made my picture.  I was back at home five minutes later and knew I had captured
something truly special. I was at a loss to explain what had just happened. It
was truly a mystery. I realized that if I were wiling to relinquish some
control, I would occasionally be rewarded with strong photographs.
I went out to search for water
in order to survive, and I was led to something shining down from the sky
and bubbling
up from the ground.

There
is synchronicity and coincidence present everywhere. Photographs are a way of
revealing hidden relationships that are only present for a moment in space and
time, seen from a unique vantage point. The New Yorkers is the record of my
self-discovery as a photographer, inside and out, manifested on the streets of
New York City.

Medium Festival: Marjorie Salvaterra

Featuring photographers seen at the Medium Festival in San Diego….

I admit that I am already a fan and friend of Los Angeles photographer, Marjorie Salvaterra, but I have no hesitancy in sharing the new body of work (still in progress) she brought to the Medium Festival. Marjorie is a diminutive and determined photographer, creating large scale and compelling visual gestures that don’t reflect her stature. Her new project, HER, is influenced by Italian cinema, with a European sensibility and an out- of-the-box approach to image making that reflects the world of women–the land mines of life, motherhood, friendships, relationships that we all navigate through on a daily basis.

Marjorie has exhibited widely including the Rencontres d’Arles, Arles, France,  Clark-Oshin Gallery, Los Angeles,  Robert Berman Gallery, Los Angeles, Rayko Photo Center, San Francisco, and The Center for Fine Art Photography in Fort Collins, Colorado. Her work was included in the George Eastman House Museum auction at Sotheby’s, New York and she was runner-up for the 2009 and 2010 Berenice Abbott Prize for Emerging Photographers and a current finalist for Critical Mass 2012.

 HER 
I am a decent woman. 
 A pretty good wife — with a great therapist, otherwise I would’ve screwed this one up way too many times. 
 A mother – I think this one I do best except between the hours of 6:15 and 7:30pm and certain whole days at a time. 
 A daughter – I was a pretty terrible daughter growing up. I’m starting to get the hang of it now that I’m a parent. 
 A good sister. 
 And lastly a friend. To some, the best and to others, impossibly guarded. 

I’m forty three years-old and I’m trying to grow as a person but so is my skin. I’m not that interested in holding onto my youth. My life is far greater now. But letting go isn’t as easy as it sounds. Some days I don’t recognize this person who looks back at me in the mirror. She is older, has responsibilities. She has had to learn that sometimes God has a bigger plan for her life than she does. Not everything goes the way she wants it to go. Things happen. Money comes and goes. So do jobs. As well as friends.

People sometimes get sick and her kids will inevitably get lice and share it with her, which is still preferable to pin worms that their friends get. She will cry over losses and and weep when she sees her child standing in a line of other children. Not because everything is wrong. But because everything is right. On the outside, she strives for peace but inside there is a turbulence of holding on too tightly to all these things that have finally brought that peace and true joy. 

With HER, she turns away from the mirror and turns the camera on her own life — examining the psychology of her age and her gender in black and white, through surreal interpretations and exaggerated gestures, reminiscent of Italian cinema, creating photographs that reflect the universal idea of womanhood and assure HER that she is not on this path alone.

Jury announced: 4th Annual International Exposure Awards for Photography & Multimedia

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An amazing, influential jury of photography experts from 3 continents has been announced for the Lens Culture International Exposure Awards 2012 for Photography & Multimedia:

Alison Nordström
Senior Curator of Photographs and Director of Exhibitions
George Eastman House
New York, NY, USA
eastmanhouse.org

Felix Hoffmann
Head Curator, C/O Berlin
Berlin, Germany
co-berlin.info

James Estrin
Co-Editor of Lens, The New York Times’ photography blog
Senior Staff Photographer, The New York Times
New York, NY, USA
lens.blogs.nytimes.com

Jean-Jacques Viau
Worldwide Internet Manager, Leica Camera AG
Solms, Germany
blog.leica-camera.com
facebook.com/LeicaCamera
leica-camera.com

Jim Casper
Founder and Director, Lens Culture
Co-Founder and Director, Lens Culture FotoFest Paris
Paris, France
lensculture.com
fotofest-paris.com

Joanne Junga Yang
Director, Y&G Art; Curator, Seoul Photo Festival
Seoul, South Korea
yngart.org

Lars Boering
Owner, Lux Photo Gallery
Amsterdam, The Netherlands
luxphotogallery.com

The Awards include 9 cash prizes, 25 honorable mention awards, and worldwide exposure for all 34 winners.

Submissions are open to ALL genres and categories, including, but not limited to: documentary / photojournalism / fine art / conceptual / fashion / cinematic / fiction / storytelling / nature / portraits / alternative processes / iPhone / other.

Entry deadline is September 16, 2012. Winners will be announced in a special issue of Lens Culture in November 2012, and a high-resolution projection of all winners will be projected at art festivals, conferences and major cultural institutions around the world during 2013.

Enter your best work today — Award recognition and exposure has the potential to significantly boost your career.

Full details — including biographies of all jurors — can be found at the awards website: lensculture.com/awards.

Register today: Lens Culture FotoFest Paris Portfolio Reviews

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Photographers:

Are you ready for success in the international marketplace?

Registration is now open for Lens Culture FotoFest Paris 2012, the 3rd annual international photography portfolio reviews in Paris on November 12-14, 2012.

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The event will bring together more than 50 influential photography experts and 150 photographers from five continents. Last year, 163 photographers from 36 countries participated — making it a truly international cultural exchange — with many, many success stories resulting from the meetings.

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The three day program — November 12-14, 2012 — is organized by Lens Culture (Paris) and FotoFest International (Houston), in cooperation with Paris Photo, the leading international fine art photography fair, which takes place November 15-18. The portfolio review will again be hosted at Spéos Paris Photographic Institute, 8, rue Jules Vallès, 75011 Paris.

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The goal of Lens Culture FotoFest Paris is to bring together serious, mid-career photographers and leading decision-makers in the field of creative photography – curators, publishers, gallery owners, festival directors, agency representatives, and art directors – who can aid the development and careers of the photographers by introducing their work throughout the world.

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Reviewers will be attending from many important organizations including The New York Times, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Carnegie Museum of Art (US), Maison Européene de la Photographie (France), Stern magazine (Germany), Seoul Photo Fair (Korea), Ballarat International Foto Biennale (Australia), George Eastman House (US), Museet for Fotokunst (Denmark), Schilt Publishing (Netherlands), Alt. + 1000 Festival de photographie (Switzerland), Anthropographia (Montreal, Canada), Encuentros Abiertos de Fotografia (Argentina), Jackson Fine Art (US), among many others.

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Julien Frydman, director of Paris Photo, is enthusiastic about Lens Culture FotoFest Paris:

“Each year, Paris Photo introduces important collectors to top galleries and photographers from around the world. In a similar way, the Lens Culture FotoFest annual portfolio reviews in Paris help connect emerging photographers with galleries, curators, publishers and other art world professionals who are always seeking new talent. Lens Culture FotoFest Paris is a perfect complement to Paris Photo, and we are proud to be partners in this important global cultural event since its inception in 2010.”

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Participating photographers have the opportunity to get editorial assignments, book publication contracts, art gallery representation, and feature articles in magazines, online and in print. In turn, the expert reviewers hope to discover new talent as well as the latest work of photographers who are already established.

See the full details — and register to participate — at www.fotofest-paris.com.

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This November, Paris will offer an extra special bonus for photography lovers. In addition to Paris Photo, and FotoFest Paris, the city-wide Month of Photography will feature more than 100 other exhibitions and special photography events at locations all over Paris.

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As in the previous two years, we expect registration to sell-out well in advance, so don’t miss your chance. Book your ticket today!

Andy Freeberg, Spinello, New York Pulse 2010, Artist: Zachari Logan

Andy Freeberg, Spinello, New York Pulse 2010, Artist: Zachari Logan

Andy Freeberg

Spinello, New York Pulse 2010, Artist: Zachari Logan,
New York, 2010
From the Art Fare series
Website – AndyFreeberg.com

Andy Freeberg was born in New York City where he learned at an early age to be a critical observer of the world and the people in it. He studied at the University of Michigan, began his career as a photojournalist and now concentrates primarily on fine art projects. Freeberg has recently emerged on the contemporary art scene as a wry commentator on the art industry itself. Long fascinated with the gallery and museum worlds, he often turns his camera on the dealers, gallery patrons, artists, museum guards, and their interplay with the works of art on view. His project Guardians, about the women that guard the art in Russian museums, won Photolucida’s Critical Mass book award and was published in 2010. The Guardians will be on view at the Cantor Museum at Stanford University through January 2013. His series, Art Fare, documenting another side of the art world, will open at Kopeikin Gallery in Los Angeles in September 2012. Freeberg’s work is in many public and private collections including the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, The Portland Art Museum, the George Eastman House, and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston.

Steve Davis, Old Pacific Highway

Steve Davis, Old Pacific Highway

Steve Davis

Old Pacific Highway,
Near Castle Rock, Washington, 2008
Website – SteveDavisPhotography.com

Steve Davis is a documentary portrait and landscape photographer. His work is in many collections, including the Houston Museum of Fine Arts, the Seattle Art Museum, the George Eastman House, and the Musee de la Photographie in Belgium. He is a former first place recipient of CENTER's Project Competition Award, and has received two Washington Arts Commission/Artist Trust Fellowships. He is represented by the James Harris Gallery, Seattle.