Tag Archives: Foundations

The Living Book of Mormon

Every summer for the past 75 years, the earliest stories of Mormonism come to life on a stage set high on the Hill Cumorah in Palmyra, N.Y. The location, considered to be the birthplace of Mormonism, is where the Angel Moroni delivered the golden plates toJoseph Smith,the religion’s founding father.The annual event attracts thousands of tourists who come not only for the show but to visit the sites that set the foundations of their religion, like the Sacred Grove and the farm where Joseph Smith lived.

Lauren Lancaster for TIME

The recreated barn on the Joseph Smith Sr. Family Historic Farm and Sacred Grove.

LightBox sent Lauren Lancaster to photograph the pageant’s opening night. It was her first experience learning about Mormonism, and Lancastersuggested we speak to the actors in the performance. carrera de fotografia . LightBox asked 16-year-old Samuel Hatch from Salt Lake City, the actor playing Joseph Smith, to explain the event and how it feels to be the leading man of the show.

What is the pageant about?

The show is about the Book of Mormon and how the records were brought fourth in the latter days by Joseph Smith.

How did you end up in the play?

My mom came for three years when she was a teenager. She had such a wonderful experience and wanted our family to do it. I didn’t expect to get the part of Joseph Smith, but I did.

Why do you think you were chosen to play Smith?

They were not just looking for someone to only deliver lines but were looking for someone with the right hair and physical appearance, I think.

How long do you get to practice?

I was cast on the 6th of July. It’s not too complex but I have to make sure I have my lines down.

The cast consists of around 750 people playing 1,200 parts, but I only get to play one.

What’s the best part?

The most insightful part for me has been to think about the man (Smith) establishing the church. I wonder if I would had that strength? It’s humbling to me because he was such an amazing man.

What was the hardest part of being in the show?

At first it was intimidating, thinking about a nightly audience of 5,000, but I’ve lost that fear and now I do my best to help the others find the spirit.

Can you tell us about the hair style?

My hair was pretty long and they saw potential in it. I had two haircuts one day and then another. Its kind of unfortunate but its for a good cause so I took that mindset.

Lauren Lancaster for TIME

The Book of Mormon displayed in many languages.

Do you see yourself doing it again?

I would most definitely do it again. In the future I hope to bring my family here, just as my mom shared this experience with us.

The Hill Cumorah Pageant, an annual summer event, is performed in Palmyra, N.Y., each night through July 21. For more information, visit their sitehere.

Dina Kantor, Ryan, Lane & Lance

Dina Kantor, Ryan, Lane & Lance

Dina Kantor

Ryan, Lane & Lance,
Treece, Kansas, 2011
From the Treece series
Website – DinaKantor.com

Dina Kantor is a photographer and teacher based in Brooklyn. She received her MFA in photography from the School of Visual Arts in 2007, and her BA in journalism and studio arts from the University of Minnesota. Her work has been exhibited nationwide and is included in the permanent collections of The Jewish Museum in New York, the Portland Art Museum and the Southeast Museum of Photography. Her work was included in Humble Arts Foundations’ The Collector’s Guide to Emerging Art Photography in 2009. In 2007, she was named to Heeb Magazine’s Heeb 100 list, as well as being included in PDN’s Photo Annual. She has received grants from the Kansas Humanities Council, the Finnish Cultural Foundation and the Finlandia Foundation National, and is currently being sponsored by Blue Earth Alliance. Currently, Dina teaches at The School of Visual Arts, Adelphi University and Nassau Community College.

Aperture is Hiring: Digital Media Assistant Position Available

Digital Media Assistant
Aperture Foundation

The position will be responsible for translating content from within the Foundation to our online platforms, including the Aperture Website, Exposures blog, Facebook, Twitter, and our Vimeo page. This includes promoting and publicizing planned events and content, as well as creating an online video and/or photographic archive of these events. The candidate must be comfortable filming, editing and publishing video to both the blog and our Vimeo account.

The ideal candidate is passionate about all things photography and art-related, well-versed in social media and SEO, and familiar with the global photography community as well as the Aperture brand. Candidate must be flexible, organized, efficient and able to juggle multiple projects at once. estudiar cine y television . Crate and Barrel Patio Furniture . IKEA Tempe . Candidate must also enjoy working in a small, close-knit team in our busy New York office.

Primary Responsibilities:
Analyze and report on user activity data; develop the Foundations understanding of visitors behavior and their connections to us online
Strategize ways to increase site audience & engagement Publish daily content with SEO value, track metrics, monitor and respond to conversations
Film, edit, and publish video that archives and promotes events
Moderate blog comments and participate in blog discussions
Listen to users and solicit and interpret user feedback
Translate feedback into actionable recommendations for audience growth
Spearheading & executing social media plans for all blog content
Assist in updating Aperture general website and store with multi-media and visual content as necessary
Coordinate and ensure the coherency of Apertures social media presence and Apertures other activities

Qualifications:
Experience in the following: online writing, editing, and blogging
Experience in video and sound recording, editing, including podcasting
Experience with still photography a plus
Strong social media and SEO skills and experience
Strong research, organizational, writing, and communication skills
Basic understanding of HTML, Google Analytics and WordPress
Interest in and/or experience with photography, New York cultural institutions, and art-related events

Please send cover letter and resume to [email protected]

 

L.A. Women by Joachim Schmid



One of the foundations of Joachim Schmid’s work is the thought that there are way too many photographs in the world already so why not put those that exist to some intelligent use. At least, let us look at them a second time and contemplate their existence, or recontextualize them and introduce further questions of what we look at, what we draw in meaning, and what are the lasting values of the images. His latest book L.A. Women has a darker, real life context which is why I have chosen it as a follow up to Watabe Yukichi’s A Criminal Investigation.

In December 2010, the Los Angeles Police Department released 180 photographs of women found in the home of a known serial murder suspect. The release of the images was a public appeal for help in identifying the women who might be missing and those still alive as the known victims number only a dozen. The photographs do not tell which are which, they provide only a pool of possibility.

Without the context of sensational serial murder attached, the images appear to be innocuous portraits made with poor quality film, digital and video cameras. All are black women but for two whites. Some would look like pictures that people post to Facebook pages or snapped by friends. Many of the women smile, some appear asleep, many sit in the passenger seats of cars. A few of the images reveal small clues that some of the women might be exposing their breasts to the photographer although none of the croppings reveal any nudity.

With the context of being attached to the suspect, we search for grim clues. Many of which appear to have been taken in the back of a van. We notice that the rear windows have been masked with opaque paper or tinfoil. Some might be prostitutes but as Schmid says in his introduction, “We don’t know,” not even if the suspect took the images himself. One is snapped standing outside of the vehicle through the open passenger side window. She smiles as if stopping to chat with a neighbor. Does she know the driver or is the smile an automatic instinctual response to the camera? Is she being enticed into the car? offered a ride? In another, the photographer casts a shadow as he(?) frames a vertical but nothing is revealed that might lead the investigation. We feel the pull of information but are left dangling within the eeriness of the images.

We stare into the faces, some blurred by technical imperfections, and are confused by their calm expressions and smiles. We know the potential of the situation they are frozen within and for a moment we connect on a basic human level for survival – to warn and protect. Or, perhaps like viewing an image of a person before execution, we look to feel fear and master death one image at a time.

L.A. Women is available through Blurb. Joachim Schmid is a part of the ABC (Artists’ Book Cooperative) which is currently the subject of a show at New York’s Printed Matter.

L.A. Women by Joachim Schmid



One of the foundations of Joachim Schmid’s work is the thought that there are way too many photographs in the world already so why not put those that exist to some intelligent use. At least, let us look at them a second time and contemplate their existence, or recontextualize them and introduce further questions of what we look at, what we draw in meaning, and what are the lasting values of the images. His latest book L.A. Women has a darker, real life context which is why I have chosen it as a follow up to Watabe Yukichi’s A Criminal Investigation.

In December 2010, the Los Angeles Police Department released 180 photographs of women found in the home of a known serial murder suspect. The release of the images was a public appeal for help in identifying the women who might be missing and those still alive as the known victims number only a dozen. The photographs do not tell which are which, they provide only a pool of possibility.

Without the context of sensational serial murder attached, the images appear to be innocuous portraits made with poor quality film, digital and video cameras. All are black women but for two whites. Some would look like pictures that people post to Facebook pages or snapped by friends. Many of the women smile, some appear asleep, many sit in the passenger seats of cars. A few of the images reveal small clues that some of the women might be exposing their breasts to the photographer although none of the croppings reveal any nudity.

With the context of being attached to the suspect, we search for grim clues. Many of which appear to have been taken in the back of a van. We notice that the rear windows have been masked with opaque paper or tinfoil. Some might be prostitutes but as Schmid says in his introduction, “We don’t know,” not even if the suspect took the images himself. One is snapped standing outside of the vehicle through the open passenger side window. She smiles as if stopping to chat with a neighbor. Does she know the driver or is the smile an automatic instinctual response to the camera? Is she being enticed into the car? offered a ride? In another, the photographer casts a shadow as he(?) frames a vertical but nothing is revealed that might lead the investigation. We feel the pull of information but are left dangling within the eeriness of the images.

We stare into the faces, some blurred by technical imperfections, and are confused by their calm expressions and smiles. We know the potential of the situation they are frozen within and for a moment we connect on a basic human level for survival – to warn and protect. Or, perhaps like viewing an image of a person before execution, we look to feel fear and master death one image at a time.

L.A. Women is available through Blurb. Joachim Schmid is a part of the ABC (Artists’ Book Cooperative) which is currently the subject of a show at New York’s Printed Matter.