Tag Archives: Fotofest

Aaron Schuman, Untitled

Aaron Schuman, Untitled

Aaron Schuman

Untitled,
Somerset, England, 2012
From the Summer Set series
Website – AaronSchuman.com

Aaron Schuman is an American photographer, editor, writer and curator based in the United Kingdom. His photographic work is exhibited internationally, and he regularly contributes photography, articles, essays and interviews to a wide-range of publications, including Aperture, Foam Magazine, Photoworks, ArtReview, Modern Painters, Hotshoe International, British Journal of Photography, and more; he has also published writings in a number of recently released books, including Pieter Hugo: This Must Be the Place (Prestel, 2012), Photographs Not Taken (Daylight, 2012), and Hijacked 3 (Big City Press, 2012). In 2010, Schuman curated Whatever Was Splendid: New American Photographs, a principal exhibitions at the 2010 Fotofest Biennial (Houston, USA); in 2011 he curated Other I: Alec Soth, Wassink Lundgren, Viviane Sassen at Hotshoe Gallery (London, UK); and he is in the midst of curating In Appropriation for the Houston Center of Photography, opening in September 2012. Schuman is a Senior Lecturer in Photography at the University of Brighton and the Arts University College at Bournemouth. He is also the founder, director and editor of the online photography journal, SeeSaw Magazine.
 

Latin America Week: Erika Diettes

This week, Argentinian photographer Eleonora Ronconi is taking over as guest curator, featuring work created by Latin American photographers…

Les presento a mi segunda selección de la semana: Erika Diettes, fotógrafa colombiana.

I found Erika’s work when I was doing some research on Colombian photographers. I was incredibly moved by her portraits of people who had lost family members to the violent wars in her country. Having grown up during a military coup, where thousands of people were kidnapped and killed, these series really struck a cord with me. I am showcasing two series of hers that go hand in hand, Sudarios and Río Abajo.


Erika was born in Cali, Colombia. She has a Masters in Social Anthropology, and BA in Visual Arts and Communications. Her work explores memory, pain, absence and death and it has been exhibited around Latin America, such as at the Museum of Modern Art in Bogotá, Centro Cultural Recoleta in Buenos Aires and Museum of Contemporary Art in Santiago, Chile, among others. Her more recent series, Sudarios, was part of the Fotofest Biennal 2012, and it is on display at the Trinity Epicospal Church in Houston. Erika has also been interviewed by several publications, El Tiempo, Revista Ñ, El Colombiano, and El Espectador to name a few.


Image from Río Abajo

What does your Latin heritage bring to your work?

Our cultural context defines us, it gives us a foundation for our conceptual criteria and stetics. It makes us react to a certain symbolic world that, as years go by, each of us molds based on our experiences.

The Latin American universe is created by catholic religion, the indigineous and African cosmogonies and the problems and strengths of the contemporary history of each nation. That is why us, Latin people, express ourselves with more passion and feelings, I think we let people see our internal universe more easily. We are not afraid of emotions, on the contrary, it is through them that we relate to others. Without trying to generalize or stereotype, of course, we characterize by a more dramatic sensitivity, full of visual richness and excesses, both in our existence and also in our representation.

The way I build images, both behind the camera and in my universe without a camera, what happens within the frame to what the audience eventually sees when images are exhibited, is the result of all my vital experience, and that is definitely built within my latin culture, my Colombian nationality, my socio cultural context and many other characteristics that make up who I am. That is clearly manifested in my work.

Do you see a difference between work created in Latin America and work created in the States? 

I think that work created in the United States has a much more technical and academic background. Photography as a college degree in the United States has a longer tradition than in our countries. When I started college 14 years ago, the possibility of getting a career in photography did not exist. Nowadays, more people have access to professional cameras and the internet takes us to an endless number of exhibitions and shows around the world, so, in a way, it makes visual models and techniques more homogeneous and differences are not as big.

Where I think there is a more obvious difference is in some of the subjects. United States, as a nation with a high number of immigrants from various countries, produces many projects about identity, questions about borders, immigration and its policies, among others. As an artist, what makes this work interesting is that despite these subjects being so specific, they have something that can connect to different audiences. This is the challenge, this is what made masters great, that they made a very specific subject become Universal.

What is the state of photography in your country–is it well supported, are galleries selling, do photographers have an outlet to show their work? 

I think that in Colombia, photography has an important place. There are more spaces to exhibit and people are more open to see and buy photography. It is a relatively new market, that will need time to establish itself, but it is clear that we are at a point where it is growing and developing rapidly. There are exhibitions being held all the time, emerging artists, more schools, critics and everything that the medium encompasses. They are very interesting times, in my opinion.

Río Abajo
 Río
Abajo is a series where I focus on the clothes which the families of the
disappeared guard as a relic of their loved ones, I make a representation of
one of the most common forms of committing this atrocious crime and that is
stripping the bodies which are thrown into the rivers.

Also,
in many cases, after the endless tortures to which they are subjected while
still alive, these victims are quartered and disfigured post mortem in such a
way that even if their corpses appear it is practically impossible to identify
them. 

We
thus turn ourselves into a country full of unburied corpses and an
infinite number of mourners afflicted by the horror of not being able
to bury their dead.
 

Image from Río Abajo exhibition

Images from Sudarios

Sudarios (Shrouds) is the
result of multiple theoretical concerns, an infinity of technical
quests and an observation of the world from a certain context. 
The intention of the this series is to enable the spectator to enter into and walk through
these impenetrable and apparently alien worlds, when he observes that
moment in which these women close their eyes because they find no
other way to communicate the true dimension of the horror which they
witnessed and the intensity of the sorrow they were subjected to.
This work tells the stories of
twenty women – victims, grief-stricken human beings who, as part of
their torture, were forced to SEE the violence perpetrated against
their loved ones and were left alive so that they would be witnesses
to such horrors. The stories are
diverse but I am convinced that this series speaks of something which
is timeless, universal and infinite. 
These are portraits of the victims who bare themselves before our eyes, showing the evil which some people are capable of and that wish to transcend that earthly realm in the hope of something better. These women want to relay the moment in which they were condemned to remember, given that the possibility of forgetting even the smallest detail does not exist. And I want to record that moment in order to construct this work, because I have the firm conviction that art not only provides an essential space for the building of a country’s memory but also furnishes a means to ease the suffering of people. \

They are the reflection of my experience of sorrow and the result of my interpretation of the effects of violence. And I also think that they are the mirror, in which you, the spectators of the work, can see the reflection of yourselves as your own sorrow becomes that of others. 

Images from Sudarios exhibition

 I always intended to print these portraits on silk because I wanted to transmit, as they themselves told me more than once, that they are beings who no longer belong to the world, that violence had left them dead in life. That is why my intention was always to attain light, diaphanous, phantasmal images that would capture that sensation and that profound wish for transcendence. The same reason explains the overwhelming sense I have that these images should be kept in sacred places and spaces of reflection, where, regardless of our religion, the journey of the work through the space would help us to be not only spectators but turn us, in one way or another, into pilgrims who will enter into communion with these images on the basis of our beliefs, so that, as Susan Sontag says, we may be able to keep this reality in mind from now onwards.

I invite you to look at the Sudarios by keeping in mind that the history of a country cannot be written in silence and its memory should not be constructed in the dark. For that reason, I believe that to tell, record, display and try to understand our history from all possible points of view is not only a need but an obligation.

Damion Berger: In The Deep End

I first met Damion Berger a number of years ago at Review LA, hosted by Center.  He was sharing his wonderful underwater images from his project, The Deep End.  I was happy to learn that he now has a monograph of the work, published by Schilt Publishing and ready for purchase.

Damion was born in London and his interest in photography was nurtured while an assistant to the late Helmut Newton before earning his B.F.A. in photography from Parsons, The New School For Design in New York. He has exhibited with galleries in Europe, the U.S. and Canada. Damion was one of ten artists chosen for the ‘Discoveries’ exhibition at this year’s Fotofest 2012 Biennial in Houston. His work is held in many private collections and he is well published. Damion lives and works in New York and Southern France.


Deep EndThis series of photographs makes use of the water’s capacity to at once de-contextualize the familiar and evoke a fusion of dreamlike memories and sense of childhood regression. The clear, warm water of the swimming pool represents an intersection between the cultural and social pursuit of leisure, the natural element of water and manmade space. The pool provides a place of temporary detachment from life’s everyday routine.  

 Katya, Monaco 

People seem liberated and at once removed from any social reference as they float, dive, sink or swim through the water. Not unlike some production from Cirque du Soleil, these unwitting cast members set the stage for a sort of contemporary choreography; the human body submerged underwater and illuminated by an ever-changing quality of light, provide all the elements for a playful ballet seemingly detached from gravity.   
 Diving Lesson, Le Roccabella, Monaco 

Smuggling an underwater camera into public swimming pools where photography is generally prohibited, for the most part I worked without the knowledge or complicity of my subjects. Whilst surreptitiously maneuvering underwater, I’d often hold my breath until near bursting-point, swimming for position and trying to hide my camera until the moment presented itself. 

 Homage to Lartigue (after Kertesz), Sardinia

Seeking out public swimming pools predominantly on the Côte D’Azur and elsewhere around the Mediterranean, I was drawn to scenes of the unusual, frequently populated with energetic children less content to wallow on the surface than their more temperate elders. These photographs pay homage to the water’s almost magical qualities and re-establish a link to happy vignettes from my own memory – the blissful abandon of youth and the warm embrace of summertime’s past.

 Fall, Asser Levy Pool, New York 

 Charlie, Monaco 

 Hula Hoops, Monaco 

 Changing Lanes, Stade Nautique Ranier III, Monaco 

 Jacuzzi, Monte Carlo Country Club, Monaco 

 Young Amphitrite, Club Med Gregolimano, Greece 

 Balancing Act, Monaco 

Bookworm, Le Roccabella, Monaco 

 The Swimmer, Monaco 

 Jaws, Capo Nero, San Remo, Italy 

 Lightbox, Stade Nautique Ranier III, Monaco

Float, Le Roccabella, Monaco 

International Photo Portfolio Reviews: Paris, Nov 12-14, 2012

fotofestparis2012-560px.jpg

3 days of international photography portfolio reviews in Paris, hosted at Spéos,
with support from Paris Photo, FotoFest International (Houston), Lens Culture, and
Amis de la Photographie Internationale.

Register today for the largest and most effective photography portfolio reviews in Europe: Lens Culture FotoFest Paris 2012. November 12-13-14, 2012.

“Lens Culture portfolio reviews are among the best —
because they get results!”

Photographers from 27 countries have registered already for this truly international photography event (many are returning for the 2nd or 3rd time):

• Belgium
• Brazil
• Canada
• Colombia
• Croatia
• Denmark
• Ethiopia
• France
• Germany
• Iceland
• Ireland
• Israel
• Italy
• Japan
• Latvia
• Netherlands
• Norway
• Poland
• Russia
• South Africa
• South Korea
• Spain
• Sweden
• Taiwan
• United States
• United Kingdom
• Wales •

Register today. Registrations are filling fast. Deadline to be included in the catalog is September 21, 2012.

Please tell all of your friends and colleagues who are serious about careers in photography. See fotofest-paris.com for full details.

Aaron Schuman, Redwoods (4)

Aaron Schuman, Redwoods (4)

Aaron Schuman

Redwoods (4),
, 2011-12
From the Redwoods series
Website – AaronSchuman.com

Aaron Schuman is an American photographer, editor, writer and curator based in the United Kingdom. His photographic work is exhibited internationally, and he regularly contributes photography, articles, essays and interviews to a wide-range of publications, including Aperture, Foam Magazine, Photoworks, ArtReview, Modern Painters, Hotshoe International, British Journal of Photography, and more; he has also published writings in a number of recently released books, including Pieter Hugo: This Must Be the Place (Prestel, 2012), Photographs Not Taken (Daylight, 2012), and Hijacked 3 (Big City Press, 2012). In 2010, Schuman curated Whatever Was Splendid: New American Photographs, a principal exhibitions at the 2010 Fotofest Biennial (Houston, USA); in 2011 he curated Other I: Alec Soth, Wassink Lundgren, Viviane Sassen at Hotshoe Gallery (London, UK); and he is in the midst of curating In Appropriation for the Houston Center of Photography, opening in September 2012. Schuman is a Senior Lecturer in Photography at the University of Brighton and the Arts University College at Bournemouth. He is also the founder, director and editor of the online photography journal, SeeSaw Magazine.
 

Photo News – FOTOTRIENNALE.dk 2012 Meeting Place Portfolio Reviews in Denmark opens 1 August

“The portfolio review of FotoTriennale.dk was a fantastic chance for me to get an initial idea of the amazingly complex photo scene, especially in Denmark and Northern Europe. I was overwhelmed by the quality of the works displayed and the exhilarating discussions with the artists.
Rudolf Scheutle, 2009 Portfolio Reviewer; Curator, Münchner Stadtmuseum,

FOTOTRIENNALE.dk MEETING PLACE PORTFOLIO REVIEW
Get ahead of the game and book your places for the portfolio reviews taking place during the opening days of the festival from 4-7 October at Brandts, Odense as part of the FotoTriennale.dk. Participating photographers can choose from 28 international curators, museum directors, gallery owners, magazine editors and publishers.

♥ In the next post, I’ll atttach a PDF from an article that I wrote for F2 photo magazine last year. There are interviews with photographers and tips for making the most of a review as well as comments from reviewers. ♥

Online booking opens on 1 August at 12:00 noon. Participating photographers will have the opportunity to select and book portfolio reviewers online by signing up for 5, 10 or 15 reviews.

More than 80 photographers from around the world took part during FotoTriennale.dk 2009.

Read more for a full list of this year’s Portfolio Reviewers…

Portfolio Reviewers

FRED BALDWIN
FotoFest International, USA

REINHARD BRAUN
Camera Austria International, Austria

BEATE CEGIELSKA
Galleri Image, Denmark

IRINA CHMYREVA
PHOTOVISA/Russian Academy of Arts, Russia

HANNAH FRIESER
Light Work, USA

JENS FRIIS
KATALOG, Museet for Fotokunst, Denmark

REETTA HAARAJOKI
The Finnish Museum of Photography, Finland

ELDA HARRINGTON
Encuentros Abiertos, Argentina

INGRID FISCHER JONGE
Museet for Fotokunst, Denmark

KRISTINE KERN
Fotografisk Center, Denmark

CHRISTOPHE LALOI
Voies-Off, France

VICTOR LEVIE
Representative for Schilt Publishing, The Netherlands

DEWI LEWIS & CAROLINE WARHURST
Dewi Lewis Publishing, England

CELINA LUNSFORD
Fotografie Forum Frankfurt, Germany

KAREN McQUAID
The Photographers’ Gallery, England

PATRICIA MENDOZA
Zul Ediciones, Mexico

ANDREAS MÜLLER-POHLE
European Photography, Germany

INGRID NILSSON
Preus Museum, Norway

MARC PRÜST
i-bmp, France

CHRISTOPHER RAUSCHENBERG
Blue Sky Gallery, USA

CHUCK SAMUELS & YASMINE TREMBLAY
Le Mois de la Photo à Montréal, Canada

NIYATEE SHINDE
Turmeric Earth, India

MARÍA KAREN SIGUR<ETH>ARDOÅLTTIR
Reykjavik Museum of Photography, Iceland

CHRISTOPH TANNERT
Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Germany

WENDY WATRISS
FotoFest International, USA

DUAN YUTING
Lianzhou International Photo Festival, China

Filed under: Photo Trienalles, Photographers, Photography Festivals, Portfolio reviews Tagged: Brandts, Denmark, FotoTriennale.dk, Odense, photo festival, photography portfolio reviews, portfolio reviews

Video: 34 Award-winning photographers & multimedia makers

A 22-minute presentation of the winners of the Lens Culture International Exposure Awards 2011 — some of the best in global photography and multimedia today.

The nine top winners and 25 honorable mention winners represent work from 14 countries – submitted by artists from 48 countries.

In 2011, the international jury of experts awarded prizes in three categories:

Photography Portfolio
Single Image
Multimedia

The winning entries cover a broad and diverse range of subject matter, stylistic approaches, and technical processes. Enjoy!

These award winners are currently being screened at film festivals and international arts venues around the world, including the SPE National Conference Film Festival in San Francisco; the Houston Center for Photography during FotoFest 2012; The Bilder Nordic series in Olso, Norway; the Voies Off Festival in Arles, France; the international photo festival in Tuscany, Italy: Cortona On The Move — and venues in Paris, London, New York, Brisbane and others to be announced.

Enter YOUR photographs and multimedia for the Lens Culture International Exposure Awards Awards 2012:
lensculture.com/awards. The competition is now open for new submissions!

Utopia/Dystopia: Construction and Destruction in Photography and Collage

Since the late 19th century, photographers have honed their craft to expose social and political truths existing in their surroundings. The use of collage has expanded on this exploration by allowing artists to reconfigure, cut and fragment photos to create entirely new images and conversations

Utopia/Dystopia: Construction and Destruction in Photography and Collage, a new exhibition at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston (MFAH), features 150 years of collage, as well as photomontages and moving images, to present “alternative realities” of utopia or dystopia.

The exhibit has more than 100 works, from as early as the 1860s to the present, with origins spanning Asia, Africa, the Americas and Europe. The show is organized around three themes: urban visions, figure construction and the quest for a utopian world, and contains pieces drawn from four museums and private holdings.

Utopia/Dystopia is the brainchild of MFAH associate photography curator, Yasufumi Nakamori. “In breaking and reassembling found images to create a new vision, artists have found collage and montage ideal for expressing utopian dreams and dystopian anxieties,” said Nakamori. Featured artists include El Lissitzky, Okanoue Toshiko, Herbert Bayer, Matthew Buckingham, Tom Thayer, among others, and although their work stems from different artistic movements—from Dada to Constructivism—all the artists embrace the compelling process of photography construction and destruction.

Utopia/Dystopia will be on display through June 10 as part of the FotoFest 2012 Biennial, the largest international photography festival in the U.S.