Tag Archives: Features Work

I’ll Be Your Mirror

HomeSpace Presents:Ill Be Your Mirror (New Orleans, LA) HomeSpace Gallery is proud to present an exploration of family through the eyes of seven contemporary photographers. Ill Be Your Mirror features work by Angela Bacon-Kidwell, Laura Burlton, Warren Harold, Aline Smithson, Gordon Stettinius, Phil Toledano and Alison Wells. Web Design Tewkesbury . Blog Commenting . carrera de fotografia . Curated by Jennifer Shaw, the images include a variety of stylistic approaches, ranging from candid glimpses to staged allegories. All document a creative collaboration between family members and all are bound by a profound intimacy. As fathers, daughters, mothers, sons, these seven brave photographers reveal the beauty, chaos, heartbreak and humor inherent in family relations. The exhibition will be on display October 13 – November 18, 2012. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, October 13th, 6-9pm. Several of the contributing artists will be in attendance. HomeSpace is located at 1128 St. Roch Street in New Orleans St. Claude Arts District and is open Saturdays 12-5pm, Sundays 12-3pm, and by appointment.HomeSpace is proud to present an exhibition exploring family through the eyes of seven contemporary photographers. Featuring: Warren Harold – Alternating Weekends Laura Burlton – Chalk Dreams Alison Wells – small & intimate wet plate collodion portraits of her children sample attached belowAline Smithson – Arrangement in Green and Black: Portraits of the Photographer’s Mother Phil Toledano Days With My Father Gordon Stettinius sepia toned images of Walker growing up Angela Bacon-Kidwell – Daily Sums (new series) OR selection from Traveling Dreams (TBD by Monday)

Crime Unseen opens Thursday with a Gallery Talk and Reception

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Christian Patterson, House at Night; Courtesy of the artist.

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Angela Strassheim, Evidence No. 4; Courtesy of the artist.

When a violent crime happens, it sends a shock that can be felt long afterward in the people and places affected. Our newest exhibition, Crime Unseen, explores the lingering affects of violent crime. Join us on Thursday, for a preview of the exhibition with a gallery talk and reception from 4 to 7 p.m.

Beginning at 4 p.m., exhibiting artists Angela Strassheim and Christian Patterson will lead guests through the museum, discussing the pieces they have on display, all of which examine real-life crime scenes long after the crimes have been committed.

From 5 to 7 p.m., guests can mingle with the visiting artists and get a sneak-peek of the exhibition, which opens on Friday. Admission is free and open to the public.

Crime Unseen, which runs through January 15, 2012, features work by Richard Barnes, Corinne May Botz, Christopher Dawson, Deborah Luster, Christian Patterson, Taryn Simon, Angela Strassheim and Krista Wortendyke. To learn more about the exhibition, read curator Karen Irvine�??s curatorial essay.

More about the lecture artists:

In her work, Strassheim seeks out homes where violent acts and murders have occurred. Using a chemical spray called Blue Star, she reveals remnants of blood remaining on surfaces long after they have been cleaned and repainted, exposing the disconnect between the banality of seemingly normal surfaces and the violent history sometimes concealed within.

Similarly, Patterson exposes the long life of violent crime by following the trail of teenage lovers Charles Starkweather and Caril Ann Fugate, who, in the winter of 1957-58, committed a string of murders in Nebraska and Wyoming. By taking photographs and documents stemming directly from their crimes, Patterson focuses on the inherent emotional responses people have toward these objects even before they know the objects’ dark origins.

Openings Tonight!

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Delphine Diallo, Monica, courtesy the artist

Exhibitions opening in Chelsea, NYC tonight!

The Black Portrait: An exhibition curated by Natasha L. Logan and Hank Willis Thomas

The word black has several meanings in our society. It may reference individuals or groups with dark skin; a complete absence of light; the opposite of white; or the embodiment of a negative or pessimistic disposition. A portrait is understood to represent a person or thing, usually in the …form of a drawing, painting, photograph, engraving, or text. 

When these terms are linked, a sense of alchemical potency is suggested. This exhibition brings together paintings, photographs, videos, collage and sculpture by ten artists contending with what it means to make a black portrait. It aims to use this linkage to expand dialogue about identity, difference, and belonging in contemporary culture.

The exhibition will feature artists Christine Wong Yap, 
Coby Kennedy,
 Aperture Portfolio Prize Runner Up Delphine Diallo, Duron Jackson,
 Felandus Thames, 
Kajahl Benes,
 Kambui Olujimi,
 Keisha Scarville, 
Shane Aslan Selzer, and
 Toyin Odutola.

Hank Willis Thomas among others will participate in the two day-conference Beauty and Fashion: The Black Portrait Symposium at the department of Photography & Imaging Tisch School of the Arts at NYU on April 2-3.

Buy a signed copy of Hank Willis Thomas’ Aperture book Pitch Blackness here!

Opening Reception:
March 31, 6:00-8:00 pm

Exhibition on view:
March 31 – May 21, 2011

Rush Arts Gallery
526 W 26th Street, Suite 311
New York, New York

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Image courtesy Ruben Natal San-Miguel

First Class/Second Class:  An exhibition curated by Asya Geisberg and Leah Oates

This exhibition features work that investigates various aspects of class structure via either a personal narrative or an outsider’s perspective. The artists come from a range of backgrounds and cultures, and do not necessarily foreground the theme of class in their work. They include Chris Verene, Rebecca Morgan, Miles Ladin, Devin Troy Strother, Ruben Natal San-Miguel, Holly Jarrett, Conor McGrady, and Brian Shumway. This exhibition extracts class as a necessary and frequently overlooked prism through which we can interpret their work. First Class/Second Class posits that class is omnipresent as an identity marker, and frequently undermines race, gender, and nationality, while simultaneously being dependent on individual circumstances.

Opening Reception:
March 31, 6:00-8:00 pm

Exhibition on View:
March 31 – May 7, 2011

Asya Geisberg Gallery
537B West 23rd Street
New York,

Watch Chris Verene here on a panel at The New School titled: Contemporary Documentary Practices.