Tag Archives: Fashion

Pictures of the Week: November 23 – 30

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From protests in Egypt and life in the aftermath of the Gaza conflict to Myanmar’s refugee camps and volcanic lava spilling into the ocean in Hawaii, TIME presents the best pictures of the week.

TIME Style&Design: Peter Hapak Photographs Marion Cotillard

To prepare for his cover sitting with Marion Cotillard for TIME Style&Design’s fall issue, photographer Peter Hapak hit the archives, collecting pictures of Paris and Parisian fashion during the 1930s, including the work of famed French photographer Jacques Henri Lartigue. Studying images of women in restaurants, chatting with friends or simply roaming the streets of the city, Hapak easily understood why Paris has long been considered a fashion capital of the world. “All of the women looked like they had walked out of a fashion magazine,” he says. “Fashion is such a big part of the culture there, and you can even feel that history when walking through the city today.”

Peter Hapak for TIME

TIME Style&Design Fall 2012

On set in Paris this August, Hapak tried to evoke this era, capturing Cotillard in designs by French fashion houses Chanel, Louis Vuitton and Christian Dior, along with other designers like Andrew Gn and Dries Van Noten. “She’s the representation of the French woman for me—elegant, but not too stylized,” says Hapak of Cotillard, who won the Academy Award for Best Actress in 2007 for her portrayal of French singer Édith Piaf in La Vie en Rose. “With the cover look, it felt like she was pulling a dress out of her own closet. It went so well with her style, and she felt really confident in it, that you would have never known she was dressing up for a shoot.”

Peter Hapak is a contract photographer for TIME. In December of 2011, Hapak photographed The Protester, TIME’s Person of the Year. 

More: See all of TIME’s Style&Design coverage

Pictures of the Week: August 24 – August 31

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From Hurricane Isaac in the Caribbean and colorful Holi celebrations in Germany to the Paralympics in London and a tree full of goats in Morocco, TIME presents the best images of the week.

Herb Ritts Retrospective: Naomi Campbell Remembers the Iconic Photographer

The long and legendary supermodel era of the ’90s can be summed up in one gorgeous and distinct photograph: Herb Ritts’ now-iconic shot of Naomi Campbell, Cindy Crawford, Christy Turlington, Tatjana Patitz and Stephanie Seymour huddled together in the nude.

But the 1989 sitting almost didn’t happen.

As Campbell recalls, Turlington was on a Calvin Klein contract and reportedly wasn’t allowed to participate. “We said, ‘How can you not be in this picture?’” Campbell says. “And she jumped in, and that was it!”

That black-and-white image is just one of nearly 80 photographs on display at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles as part of a new exhibition and book on the photographer. Herb Ritts: L.A. Style, on view through Aug. 12, focuses on the portraits and nudes from Ritts, who documented models, musicians, actresses and other celebrities for magazines such as Interview, Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair throughout his career.

“He always had a vision about how he wanted every picture,” Campbell says. “He liked strength in his pictures, and he got you to do things that you never thought you could do. He was very encouraging and would talk to you about a picture first, and slowly get you there to where he wanted. And you’d be amazed that you even could do that. It was always a pleasure working with him. He was a complete gentleman, and I loved every picture he took of me.”

Herb Ritts—© Herb Ritts Foundation

Herb Ritts: L.A. Style is on view through Aug. 12 at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles.

Campbell first met Ritts in the late ’80s when she was introduced by fellow model Tatitz. She would often stay with him when she visited Los Angeles, and the two later traveled together to South Africa, where Ritts captured the first photograph of the supermodel with former South African president Nelson Mandela. “He was just a really special human being, and someone that I know is dearly missed in fashion—you never see that kind of picture anymore,” Campbell says.

And while many people revere the image of the five supermodels as one of the most famous sittings in fashion photography, Campbell says they had no idea it would become so iconic. “It was just nice for us to be together,” she says. “We rarely get to do pictures together—even to this day—so it was like a catch-up time for us. We got there in the morning, had lunch and then he told us what we were going to do. It was easy—it was always easy with Herb.”

Herb Ritts: L.A. Style is on view through Aug. 12 at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles and the book by Paul Martineau is available here.

These Boots Were Made for Dancing: Pointy Shoes South of the Border

Photographers Alex Troesch and Aline Paley first saw the long, pointy Mexican boots on a video through Facebook. “It was so funny at first, seeing this group of people dancing in the boots to this crazy music,” Troesch says. “But then we realized how great it was to see another side of northern Mexico—people being silly and having fun. It’s usually portrayed as so rough, with a lot of violence.”

Inspired by the video they saw, the Brooklyn-based duo, who have known each other three years, traveled to Matehuala, Mexico in late January to see the boots with their own eyes. There, they met a young man named Gerardo Gallegos, who showed them around the city and brought them to various clubs, where they witnessed people dancing in the long-toed shoes firsthand. Many of the most fanatic dancers were teenagers, and the two photographers even met several kids who were making these boots by hand in their living rooms.

In northern Mexico, the pointy boots trend is more about flash than fashion. “They’re worn by people who want to impress other people,” Troesch says. In fact, one boot maker they met had transformed a regular pair of shoes into pointy boots for a client who wanted to impress the jury of a dance contest. That’s how the fervor started—but not everyone is a fan. “Sometimes you’d hear people teasing others about wearing the boots,” Troesch says. “Still, it was very interesting for us to witness how such a common object—cowboy boots—worn by so many people in northern Mexico could be reinvented and reappropriated by young teenagers whose eyes and ears are so many times directed towards the other side of the border.”

Alex Troesch and Aline Paley are Brookyln-based photographers. See more of their work here and here.

TIME Style and Design: Futuristic London Fashion

For TIME Style & Design’s fashion shoot with British actors Tom Hiddleston and Michelle Dockery, photographer Jonathan de Villiers got to work on the roof of what is the tallest hospital in the world, Guy’s Hospital in London. And that wasn’t the only superlative in play: “This is, dare I say it, one of the best periods for British fashion,” says de Villiers. “There’s a whole crop of new young designers.”

Style & Design

Behind the scenes on the roof of Guy’s Hospital.

Fittingly for forward-looking designers, the shoot’s concept involved time travel from the future. The photographer, who hails from London but now lives in Paris, says that the city has recently embraced its own relationship with the future: in the last decade, the city seems to have recovered from backlash against ’60s modernism, he says, and its architecture has moved in a more avant-garde direction. Much of de Villiers’ work in Paris has to do with clichés about the fantasy of the city of lights, and he says that it was fun to get a chance to engage in similar reflection about his hometown—even if its archetypes are stuffier.

“People think of London as a very traditional city with a lot of old stuff, but in the last decade there’s been a kind of re-imagining,” he says. ”I think the most interesting thing to be said about this shoot is the whole question of projecting ideas about a place and how that carries through to clothes and perceptions of design.”

But for this shoot de Villiers’ vision of the future also had to conquer the present—or at least the present-day weather. Although the shoot featured British fashion designers’ spring/summer collections, it was very much winter. “It was bitterly cold at ground level, and I could see the clouds racing across the sky, and I was thinking ‘Oh my God, by the time we get up on that roof it’s going to be crippling,” says de Villiers of the rooftop shoot. “But the actors were quite game and the sun came out and everything.”

For a deeper look into that future—and a take on London from a different kind of future perspective—check out this video shot on the set:

TIME Style and Design: Peter Hapak Photographs Emily Blunt

Photographer Peter Hapak asked Emily Blunt to get into character during the cover shoot for TIME Style and Design, which relaunches this March after a three-year hiatus. It was an easy task for the British actress, who has played myriad roles—from a bossy fashion assistant to a young royal—in her career and currently stars opposite Evan McGregor and Kristin Scott Thomas in Salmon Fishing in the Yemen.

“I wanted to create something that didn’t feel earthy,” Hapak says. “So I asked her to imagine that she was in outer space, where she was experiencing different noises and light and trying to get along in this new space.” Hapak, who used harsh light to bring out sharp highlights and shadows on Blunt, even likes to say he was working with two different people during the sitting. “The thing about fashion is when people walk in, they look like every other person wearing normal clothes,” he says. “But when we are working on a fashion shoot, we’re creating a stylized person, a character that completely differs from the actual person.”

The cover shoot, which took place in New York City this Februrary, was a reunion of sorts for Hapak. The selection of clothing and pairing of designers such as Prada and Stella McCartney were creatively conceived by Ali Toth and Aniko Virag, stylists whom Hapak first met in Hungary nearly six years ago. In fact, it was Toth and Virag who commissioned Hapak for his first foray into fashion photography. “I was photographing dancers and experimenting with how dancers can interpret fashion in different ways,” Hapak says. “They saw one of my series and called me to collaborate.”

Among the many outfits Blunt exhibited for their latest collaboration, Hapak’s favorite piece was a black Balenciaga hat worn by the actress on the cover. “I just loved that Balenciaga hat,” Hapak says. “And this is exactly what I like about fashion. The right accessory speaks for itself—and the entire picture.”

Read more from TIME Style & Design

Shoot NYC at The Terminal Building

This Thursday and Friday, visit Aperture Foundation at SHOOT NYC, an exciting and informative forum featuring live shooting sets incorporating the latest photographic technology on the market today. In addition to a wide range of free professional photography seminars, industry leaders Broncolor and Hasselblad will help you learn how to harness and integrate the market’s most advanced photographic tools into your business, improving both your photography and your bottom line.

This event is ideal for professional photographers, photo assistants, advanced students, or any imaging professional that would like to learn about the latest cutting edge products and techniques being used in the professional digital image capture market. Whether you are interested in fashion, portraiture, stock, or repro, there will be a range of valuable seminars delivered by the most relevant speakers in the industry.

In addition, you will be able to take a tour of the Hasselblad Masters exhibition, which will feature images of the 2012 competition finalist.

Thursday, October 28, 2011 – Friday, October 29, 2011
10:00 am – 7:00 pm
FREE
Register online here!

The Terminal Building
11th Avenue and  West 28th Street
New York, New York 10001