Tag Archives: Faces

Small Ball! The Faces of Baseball’s True World Series

On Aug. 20, Will Lucas, a lanky righty from Fairfield, Conn., pitched a no-hitter in the Little League World Series. link pyramid . His performance was the opening highlightthe leadon ESPNs SportsCenter the next morning. Thats a lot of pressure to put on a bunch of prepubescent ballplayers, a few with voices higher than an Albert Pujols homer. Are we such a sports-obsessed society that well devour the sporting thrills and heartbreak of children just to hold us over until football season?

But try telling the 11-year-olds from impoverished Lugazi, Uganda, who play in bare feet at home, why they shouldnt be on television. Theyll just keep smiling and having the time of their lives in Williamsport, Pa., host since 1947 to the seriesa 10-day tournament featuring eight teams from across the U.S. and eight international teams from places like Mexico, Curaao, Japan and Panama.

Plus, the kids give better interviews than the pros. After Lucas hurled his no-no, an ESPN reporter asked a typical postgame question: How did it feel to be on the bottom of a celebratory dog pile? Its exciting, Lucas said. But then at the end, it really hurts. Sharp, and funny. Can we call him up to the big leagues?

Sean Gregory is a staff writer atTIME.

Wayne Lawrence is a Brooklyn-based photographer. See more of his work here.

Portraits of Influence: Faces of the TIME 100

From media magnates and shapewear superstars to a humanoid robot and the President of the United States, LightBox presents portraits of subjects in this year’s TIME 100 issue. For our annual list of the most influential people of the year, TIME commissioned the images in this gallery.

Read more about these newsmakers — and 77 others — in the TIME 100.

Soldier portraits: Before, During, and After War

How do the faces of soldiers change before, during, and then after war? Can we detect profound or subtle psychological shifts just by looking at their portraits?

This is precisely the challenge that Claire Felicie presents with her series of triptych portraits of marines of the 13th infantry company of the Royal Netherlands Marine Corps. battlefield 3 hack . solar panel training . The series, Here are the Young Men (Marked), shows close-cropped portraits of the Dutch marines before, during and after they were deployed to Uruzgan, Afghanistan in 2009-2010.

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Photo portraits of young soldiers before, during, and after their tours duty at war in Afghanistan Claire Felicie

Without doubt, every viewer will project a bit of himself or herself into the readings of these photographs. No matter what conclusions you draw, the images are haunting and compelling. See the full series here in Lens Culture. For best results, click the slideshow option to view high-resolution images.

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Photo portraits of young soldiers before, during, and after their tours duty at war in Afghanistan Claire Felicie

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Photo portraits of young soldiers before, during, and after their tours duty at war in Afghanistan Claire Felicie

Ash

We don’t all come to photography in the same way. Many of us find our photographic passions after we have lived a little. Ash is one of those photographers. Coming from from a very industrial blue collar background where 9-5 was valued more than education, he worked his way through college doing freelance graphic work. He then turned to sculpture, creating functional pieces from old machines (ars ex machina). He’s a wanderer, zigzaging across the US and New Zealand, and currently wandering about Michigan with an old Nikon FE in his hands.

Much of his work revolves around things left behind, objects and places abandoned and transformed by the passage of time. His series, Toy Box, looks at objects once loved and coveted by their adolescent owners that have taken on new incarnations. Rather than put the objects in context within the setting, he choses to take a close look at the faces and hands that once generated comfort and pleasure.

I focus a great deal on abandonment and loss in my work. About 2 years ago I found a doll on a child’s grave and realized I’d been stepping over similar memento mori for a long time. I started to focus on those items left on graves. The Toy Box series is exclusively toys on the graves of children. I find the duplicity of these things to be fascinating. I think beauty and grotesque, joy and pain, love and hate are so inextricably tied to one another that it’s impossible to find one without being haunted by the other. The overwhelming loss to these people has given rise to memorials that are exactly what they try to hide: something cute and adorable left to rot and turned grotesque. They rarely seem to return to pay homage, instead we’re left to find these haunting moments in their lives.

Kay von Aspern

When you think of Vienna, one doesn’t immediately think of quirky street photography, but Kay von Aspern has a gift for finding it. Born in Germany, now living in Vienna, Kay is a “Collector of Moments”. A member of the German-Austrian street photographer collective seconds2real, Kay looks for those unique juxtapositions that can only be found with the heightened visual acuity that comes from split second observations.

“Sometimes he’s a magician. He makes something visible, the others remain hidden. The puzzle pieces of city life creates a single picture in front of his lens. Then he presses the shutter button and keeps the moment in a unique composition. This photo does not form a situation from what it is, but as only he can see them. A bit of luck is occasionally in the game: On bad days the road seems to want to reveal anything and even for hours photographic stroll remains unrewarded. On good days, it gives the photographer a special light or a unique meeting right from your own front door. For these moments, he makes repeatedly on the way to the special in the ordinary noted.”

Images from Faces

Images from Street

Photographer #276: Damon Winter

Damon Winter, 1974, USA, is a photographer who is highly competent in various kinds of photography. He is based in New York City and works as a staff photographer for The New York Times. He focuses on photojournalism, documentary work, celebrity portraiture and travel photography. For his work he has traveled extensively to places as Iceland, Japan and Afghanistan. His photo essay on sexual abuse victims in Alaska in 2005 was nominated for a Pullitzer Prize, but it wasn’t until 2009 that he won the Pullitzer Prize for feature photography with his images that captured the different facets of Barack Obama’s presidential campaign. The following images come from his portfolio Faces and from the stories Afghanistan and Haiti Earthquake.

Website: www.damonwinter.com

Photographer #251: James Mollison

British photographer James Mollison, 1973, born in Kenya, published his latest book Disciples in 2008. For three years he photographed fans outside various concerts. He was fascinated by the different tribes of people and how they copied their favourite stars. In 2004 the book James & Other Apes came out. James was struck by the similarity of the human face to the faces of monkeys. He photographed the monkeys in various places on this planet using the aesthetic of the passport photograph. The following images come from the series The Disciples, James & Other Apes and Hunger.


Website: www.jamesmollison.com

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Photographer #251: James Mollison

British photographer James Mollison, 1973, born in Kenya, published his latest book Disciples in 2008. For three years he photographed fans outside various concerts. He was fascinated by the different tribes of people and how they copied their favourite stars. In 2004 the book James & Other Apes came out. James was struck by the similarity of the human face to the faces of monkeys. He photographed the monkeys in various places on this planet using the aesthetic of the passport photograph. The following images come from the series The Disciples, James & Other Apes and Hunger.


Website: www.jamesmollison.com