Tag Archives: Experiences

Kati Mennett

Kati Mennett creates visual stories, and as her website states, she is in search of the spectacular. Currently living in Massachusetts, Kati graduated from the Art Institute of Boston with a BFA in Photography. He work has been exhibited in the US and Europe and featured in publications such as Another Man, Dayfour, F-Stop Magazine, Vogue Italia, and Umter Magazine.

I like the idea that she is looking for the spectacular in the mundane. Kati is infatuated with the notion that fantasy is constantly a part of reality–and those ideas make us look at ordinary things with a fresh eye.

Portrayers: All of my work is inspired by childhood wonder. I never want to loose that outlook on life, the thrill of the unknown and the ability to find beauty in everything.

My documentary on my family and friends is about finding the beauty in the sometimes mundane and everyday life. Having awareness of how temporary life is, I am chronicling all my experiences and relationships to give them permanence.

My series Portrayers is about creating fantasies. Whether they be about adventure, love or mystery, these images are meant to excite and entertain!

Annual Gala Tickets Now On Sale

Gala%20Tickets.jpg

You don’t need a secret knock or a password to get into the MoCP’s speakeasy-themed annual Benefit and Auction on Friday, November 18. So, men, put on your spats and, ladies, break out your fringe. Come ready to drink custom cocktails, take pictures in a classic photo booth and dance the night away to a four-piece jazz ensemble.

And when we ask you to “stick ‘em up,” we really just mean your auction paddles, as we auction off a selection of photographs and unique experiences, all to benefit the museum’s programming. Please take a look at our website for a full list of auction items.

Tickets can be purchased through the gala page on our website or by calling 312-369-7104.

Annual Gala Tickets Now On Sale

Gala%20Tickets.jpg

You don’t need a secret knock or a password to get into the MoCP’s speakeasy-themed annual Benefit and Auction on Friday, November 18. So, men, put on your spats and, ladies, break out your fringe. Come ready to drink custom cocktails, take pictures in a classic photo booth and dance the night away to a four-piece jazz ensemble.

And when we ask you to “stick ’em up,” we really just mean your auction paddles, as we auction off a selection of photographs and unique experiences, all to benefit the museum’s programming. Please take a look at our website for a full list of auction items.

Tickets can be purchased through the gala page on our website or by calling 312-369-7104.

Rawiya Photo Collective

 

Rawiya is a photography collective founded by five female photographers from across the Middle East.

Rawiya presents an insider’s view of a region in flux balancing its contradictions while reflecting on social and political issues and stereotypes.

As a collective, Rawiya’s photographers respect the human dignity of the stories they tell, pooling resources and vision to produce in-depth photo-essays and long-term projects.

Rawiya, meaning “she who tells a story”, brings together the experiences and photographic styles of Tamara Abdul Hadi, Laura Boushnak, Tanya Habjouwa, Dalia Khamissy and Newsha Tavakolian.

 

Visit Rawiya Photo Collective

Rawiya on Facebook

Or click on a photo below to see that photographer’s website:

Tamara Abdul Hadi
Laura Bousnak
Tanya Habjouqa
Dalia Khamissy
Newsha Tavakolian

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What’s Next?

I’ve just written a piece for the magazine European Photography in which I touch on the lack of substantial online discussion on current trends in photography and where things are going. I’ll be posting the piece on eyecurious soon, so I won’t go into detail here, but in general my feeling is that although online activity on photography is growing by the day, it is becoming commensurately shallower as a result. Fortunately there are examples which buck the trend. Foam, the Amsterdam photo-museum, has recently added What’s Next? to its expanding range of content. What’s Next? is a supplement to Foam’s quarterly magazine but also an online discussion forum which is designed to spark discussion on current trends and how they are affecting the development of photography. The museum recently organised an expert meeting in Amsterdam around the What’s Next project with an impressive line-up including Charlotte Cotton, Fred Ritchin, Thomas Ruff, Joachim Schmid and many others (you can see a number of the presentations from the meeting on Foam’s youtube channel). Although the design of the site messes with my eyes and head a little bit, there is some terrific content on here running from photobooks to photojournalism. As a blogger I find that the most satisfying experiences writing online are those which spark a discussion, debate or even an argument. If you are interested in any of the above, I highly recommend a visit to What’s Next?

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Related posts:

  1. Paris in Amsterdam
  2. Notes on 2010
  3. Unless You Will

What’s next?

Coinciding with FOAM‘s tenth anniversary is a forward-looking micro-site: What’s Next. The site a selection of articles and reflections by some of the most interesting minds in photography today, covering everything from the future of the institution to the effects of digital media on photography.

The good people at FOAM say: “The question ‘What’s Next?’ is founded in our conviction that photography has fundamentally changed during the last twenty years. And this process of change and transition might not be finished yet. The digitalization of the medium has altered every aspect of photography, whether it is the photograph as an object, the position of the professional photographer, the function of the photo lab, the news agency or the photography museum.

In fact the question ‘What’s Next?’ is about far more than ‘just’ the future of photography. It is also about the future of a society dictated by visual media, of a society in which people primarily communicate with technological tools that have been developed and made into consumer products with incredible speed. It is about the future of a society in which every layman can and will be a photographer, sharing his experiences with newly made online communities, a society in which the experience of time and space have drastically changed.”

In conjunction with the website FOAM recently held a fascinating symposium, a few video clips of which you can see here:

To see more videos like this from FOAM click here

New video: Adrian Wood from reGeneration2

In this interview, British photographer Adrian Wood presents the spirit of his work, his influences, and his interpretation of portraiture and stage photography. Wood centers his work on people, their experiences, and their lives.

reGeneration2: tomorrow’s photographers today exhibition and accompanying publication, is presented by Aperture Foundation from January 20 through March 17, 2011, in collaboration with the Musée de l’Elysée in Lausanne, Switzerland, and with the support of Pro Helvetia and the Consulate General of Switzerland in New York.

Stay tuned for more video interviews with artists from this exhibition to be featured on the blog!

Click here to view and purchase the reGeneration2: tomorrow’s photographers today book

View previous interviews with curators William A. Ewing and Nathalie Herschdorfer here and artists Geoffrey H. Short and Kristoffer Axen.

Susan Barnett

“After Neon” © Susan Barnett

Susan Barnett is a fine art photographer who has couple of very interesting series in her website. The first one,”After Neon“, are images of storefronts and reflections, with a mix of colors, patterns and simple forms that are visually compelling.

“Not in Your face” © Susan Barnett

The second series is more interesting and original. Entitled “Not in your face“, she photographs the back of T-Shirts of people she finds in the streets. In similar ways, both series share the beauty of patters and patterns interrupted and speak about regular life and experiences. In the second case, the patterns on T-shirts. Visually, the sequence of images forms a line of storytelling, a form of biographic self-identity of the subjects.

In the series “Not In Your Face” the t-shirt is starkly evident but the photographs are not about the t-shirt per se. They are about self-identity and validation. Each one of these people reveal a part of themselves that advertises their hopes, ideals, likes, dislikes, political views, and personal mantras. They wear a kind of badge of honor that says “yes, I belong to this group not the other.”

“Not in Your face” © Susan Barnett