Tag Archives: Exhibition

Chloe Borkett

All images © Chloe Borkett

Chloe Borkett’s vision is sensitive to the melancholia of the world. Her project Stories East of the River is a delicate yet direct document on the lives of the younger generation in small republic of Transdniester in the region of Moldova. Portraits, punctuated with lyrical details and brooding landscapes, capture a sense of an uncertain future for a generation whose identity and solid basis for growth is riddled with doubt. Sitters stare into space or look directly back at the viewer as if searching for something positive with bold yet concerned expressions.

Says Borkett: “The young are deeply proud to be Russian but are starting to question the tiny Republic’s success and the implications on their futures. International trade is restricted; jobs and opportunities are limited and on-going difficulties with obtaining expensive visas, limits economic migration.”

Borkett’s strength is in her beautiful use of colour to convey a sense of the story without either artistic indulgence or hard, objective, journalistic tactics.

Born in 1978, she graduated with a degree in documentary photography from the University of Wales, Newport and is now based in London. She has been involved in various exhibitions including the Ian Parry exhibition in 2011. She continues to pursue projects concerning social issues with a focus on human rights. To view more work from this series click here.

PERIPHERAL VIEWS CLOSING RECEPTION AND GALLERY TALK

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Martin Hyers & William Mebane, from the series Empire, 2006


Thursday, September 27, 2012 | 4:00pm | MoCP Join us as we welcome Peripheral Views exhibiting artists Veronica Corzo-Duchardt with Martin Hyers and William Mebane for a talk about their work; a closing reception for the exhibition follows.Peripheral Views: States of America brings together artists grappling with the difficulty of picturing America during present times.The gallery talk will begin at 4:00pm and the reception will follow from 5:00 – 7:00pm. This event is free and open to the public.


banner_ad1eblast.jpgMoCP | 600 S. carrera de fotografia . Time Warner New York . Blog Submission . Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60605 | 312.663.5554 | [email protected]

PERIPHERAL VIEWS CLOSING RECEPTION AND GALLERY TALK

Empire%20web%20eblast.jpg
Martin Hyers & William Mebane, from the series Empire, 2006


Thursday, September 27, 2012 | 4:00pm | MoCP Join us as we welcome Peripheral Views exhibiting artists Veronica Corzo-Duchardt with Martin Hyers and William Mebane for a talk about their work; a closing reception for the exhibition follows.Peripheral Views: States of America brings together artists grappling with the difficulty of picturing America during present times.The gallery talk will begin at 4:00pm and the reception will follow from 5:00 – 7:00pm. High Speed Internet For You . Fotografia . Links backlinks blog comments . This event is free and open to the public.


banner_ad1eblast.jpgMoCP | 600 S. Michigan Ave Chicago, IL 60605 | 312.663.5554 | [email protected]

Matthew Schenning, Homeless Campsite

Matthew Schenning, Homeless Campsite

Matthew Schenning

Homeless Campsite,
Porto, Portugal, 2010
From the Beyond This Point series
Website – Schenning.com

Matthew Schenning is a Brooklyn based photographer originally from Baltimore, MD where he spent his youth playing in the abandoned spaces under highway overpasses. After studying sculpture at the University of Maryland he turned his focus toward photography as a means to understand his relationship to his surroundings. Making most his work while travelling, he photographs the landscape with a large format camera favoring the slow and deliberate way of working. He has been included in many exhibitions both in the United States and Europe. His work was featured in the first edition of The Collector’s Guide to Emerging Art Photography published by the Humble Arts Foundation and most recently in the exhibition catalogue for If This Is It published by Waal-boght Press.

Photo News – 16th Bradford Fellowship Photography scheme calls for applicants for the first time

The Bradford Fellowship in Photography is the Museum’s longest standing cultural partnership…
In every case the scheme has contributed significantly to both the development of the Fellow’s practice and provided a unique opportunity for students in Bradford to interact with significant artists. We are proud of its legacy and excited to announce a call for the 16th Bradford Fellow.”
Greg Hobson, Curator of Photographs at the National Media Museum.

For the first time in its 27-year history the 16th Bradford Fellow in Photography scheme, which includes a £10,000 award, a major exhibition and the opportunity to work with higher education students, has been opened to applications.

AIM
To support mid-career photographers in their professional activity and works with the artist and the Fellowship partners to share knowledge and learning about the practice of photography. Specifically, “to enable a photographer/artist to explore their personal artistry and ideas to produce a new body of work”. Also, for the artist to work with students at Bradford College and University of Bradford to give an insight into the artist’s working practice and to encourage the development of the students’ own practice.

DEADLINE
3 September. Full details can be found at Bradford Fellowship in Photography.

WHO CAN APPLY
Applicants should be photographers or artists working with photography, be established in their field and have a history of exhibitions, publications, commercial and/or significant editorial work.

Applicants should have a track record of teaching at FE/HE levels and be fully committed to delivering the teaching aspect of the Fellowship in Bradford.

We welcome collaborative applications and proposed artworks created by individuals or groups of artists. Please note if a collaborative proposal is selected the fee for the project be equally divided between the artists taking part.

Applicants are required to be UK residents.

HOW TO APPLY
Submissions should be sent by post only. Include the following information in both digital (on CD) and printed formats. Project proposal (800 words max), technical requirements, project schedule, artist CV, artist statement and any supporting material (written documents). There is an application fee of £15 (cheques only) for each submission. Please make payable to ‘National Media Museum’.

ABOUT THE FELLOWSHIP
The Bradford Fellowship – a partnership between the National Media Museum, University of Bradford and Bradford College – has previously been based on nominations. This year it’s an open call.

The Fellowship was established in 1985. There have been 15 previous recipients of the Fellowship, including Fay Godwin, Donovan Wylie, Neeta Madahar, Sarah Jones, Paul Graham and Nick Danziger.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Bursaries, Visual Artists Tagged: 16th Fellowship Photography, Bradford, Greg Hobson, National Media Museum, photography bursary

Andy Freeberg’s uncanny portraits of Russian museum guards

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Yuri Kugachs Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery, 2009.
From the Guardians series Andy Freeberg

In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over.

In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russias great art. A woman in Moscows State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. article writing submission . Links backlinks blog comments . Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, as old women do. She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.

Andy Freeberg

See and read more about Freeberg’s current exhibition, Guardians, at the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University.

Living Legend: Polish Photographer Jerzy Lewczynski

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© Jerzy Lewczynski. Portrait of Zdzislaw Beksinski, 1959.
Photograph from the collection of the Museum in Gliwice.

One of the many delights of attending smartly curated photo festivals, such as the yearly Krakow Photomonth in Poland, is discovering a previously unknown (to me) genius. This year, I was knocked out by a wonderful retrospective of the wildly creative and experimental work of Jerzy Lewczynski, who was born in 1924, and was present and pleasantly talkative at the opening of his exhibition in 2012.

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© Jerzy Lewczynski. From the Negatives cycle, 1975.
Photograph from the collection of the Museum in Gliwice.

The retrospective is accompanied by a limited edition book, as well as a catalog that includes a great interview with the photographer. Lens Culture is honored to be able to share many of the images, as well as the full text of the interview (in Polish, as well as in an English translation).

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© Jerzy Lewczynski. Doors, 1970.
Photograph from the collection of the Museum in Gliwice.

Discovering this lifelong body of work all at once was really stunning. And I walked away with great appreciation for Lewczynski’s visionary sense of humor, respect for history and humanity, and love of the photographic image.

Landscapes on the Verge of Change

The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) has a strong collection of Japanese photography and a history of showing important photographic work from that country to American audiences, dating back to a 1999 retrospective of the work of Daido Moriyama. free basic cable . Last year, curator Lisa Sutcliffe began work on putting together an exhibition of the work of Naoya Hatakeyama, a photographer whom she describes as one of the most interesting Japanese artists working right now but someone who has not yet become well known in the United States. She traveled to Japan to meet with himin March of 2011, when the tsunami struck, destroying Hatakeyamas hometown of Rikuzentakata and killing his mother.

The show that Sutcliffe and Hatakeyama were meant to discuss was transformed by those events. The result is Natural Stories, organized in cooperation with the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography and opening at SFMOMA on July 28. The exhibition is a retrospective, featuring more than 100 photographs along with videos, all with a focus on the artists landscape work.

All of his work is looking at landscapes in transition. It draws on the tradition of the sublime, so even when the work is peaceful theres always this quality of on-the-verge-of-change, Sutcliffe says. Even if the photographs are sort of peaceful and idyllic there is this sense of this other, more interesting system at work.”

The earliest work in the show comes from Hatakeyamas Lime Hills series, which the artist began in 1986. Those photographs of a landscape shaped by a desire for the natural resources within are, says Sutcliffe, a sort of jumping-off point for the career that followed, throughout which Hatakeyama has explored the relationship between the land and the people who live and work in it. And, ever since the tsunami, the balance of power in that relationship is exceedingly clearand seeing Hatakeyamas photographs from 25 years ago next to his work from this past year just underscores that point.

You look at these landscapes where humans have interacted with the landscape, and you see the pictures after the tsunami, Sutcliffe says, and just how much nature really does still have power over us.

Naoya Hatakeyama is an award-winning Japanese photographer. The exhibitionNaoya Hatakeyama: Natural Storiesis on view at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art from July 28 Nov. 4, 2012.