Tag Archives: Exhaustion

Last Days on the Road with Obama by Brooks Kraft

After months of nearly non-stop campaigning, President Obama and his team have spent the last two weeks crisscrossing the country to make their final appeals to voters. Veteran political photographer Brooks Kraft has been there to document the campaign’s final days.

This was the eighth presidential campaign that Kraft has photographed, and his sixth for TIME. Over the years, he has honed his approach to shooting some of the most photographed men and women in the United States. seo marketing . Kraft rarely takes his pictures from the press platforms, preferring to move around, searching out unique angles and small details.

“I attempt to work around all the messaging and clutter surrounding the candidate, to take photographs that reflect the character of the campaign,” he told TIME.

These photographs, many shot in so-called ‘battleground’ states, capture the energy and exhaustion of a campaign winding down.Kraft captures both the quiet detailsfrom Secret Service agents on a distant roof to a close-up of a pink breast cancer awareness bracelet on the President’s wrist and the dramatic moments ecstatic crowds pressing toward the stage and the President silhouetted against spotlights as he speaks.

Shooting politics for so many years has allowed Kraft to make iconic pictures that transcend the obvious. “Shooting campaigns requires patience and persistence,” he said. “It can take many days of long travel to find images that can last beyond the daily news cycle.”

Brooks Kraft is a Washington D.C.-based photographer.

Photographing the Clashes in Cairo

Last week, as protests once again raged in the streets of Cairo, Magnum photographer Moises Saman was there. Over three days, he documented the ongoing street battles near his residence in the Garden City area—right around the corner from the American Embassy and Tahrir Square.

With rocks and tear-gas canisters flying through the air, Saman understood that he only had a small window of time to work.

“If you’re putting yourself right in the middle, eventually you’ll get hit,” he said. “You have to work fast.”

Taking cover behind a burnt car, Saman photographed protestors in the streets early on the morning of Sept. 14th. It was there that he shot the photograph featured as the opening Worldview spread in this week’s issue of TIME. Police and protestors had clashed throughout the night, following a string of unrest earlier in the day that had resulted in the attack of the American Embassy. Arriving at the protests, Saman found a varied scene.

“It was around 7 or 8 am,” he told TIME, “and the mood was tense. There were not many photographers around—I was one of the only foreigners.”

The street gleamed with pools of water from police water cannons, reflecting men standing defiantly in the street. Improvised tools of outrage littered the roadway: stones, chunks of concrete, burned-out vehicles and broken tree branches.

In the background, lines of men fanned out, some with arms crossed, others recording the spectacle with their cell phones. Taking advantage of a brief lull, several sat on the curb, nursing their exhaustion from a long night of clashes and tear-gas.

Moving quickly, Saman photographed young men as they scavenged for stones. Working in the no man’s land between the groups, the photographer needed to turn his back to police in order to capture the action in front of him. Although security forces weren’t firing live ammunition, the risk of injury was still high: “Getting hit with a rock will ruin your day,” he jokes.

Living in Cairo for the past year has taught Saman that he can’t afford the luxury of hanging around a scene waiting for the best light and peak action. It’s often when one lingers too long that problems can arise.

“You need to work quickly,” he said. “You need to work with purpose.”

Moises Saman, a Magnum photographer based in Cairo, was previously featured on LightBox for his work from Libya.

Mark Sherratt

Mark Sherratt’s terrific new project, Train, is intriguing on several levels. As foreigners, how do we enter into a culture that is not our own and describe it in a way that is authentic and unique? Mark has captured a way to create portraits of Indian commuters that perfectly frame the essence of daily life. Moments of exhaustion, of curiosity or boredom, and ultimately, connection, allow us to find our commonalities.

Mark started working as a photographer at a family portrait studio in a small town in England, where he fell in love with photography, and out of love with the family portrait business. He is now an advertising and editorial photographer based in London.

TRAIN: Whilst traveling around India by train I became captivated by the diverse and interesting people that I met along the way and I started the project as a way to document them.

I think what is so fascinating for me about the trains is that they are such a microcosm of Indian society. They are full of the rich, the poor, old, young etc etc. I think they are also a great example of how the society there functions, they are often crowded and hectic, but everything seems to work really well; there is always room for one more and people are always willing to help you out.

By taking these photos I wanted to try and capture this moment to allow the viewer to break though this chaotic situation and to focus on a single person or a few people who, in a place like India, just become a part of the crowd.

Photographer #403: Chadwick Tyler

Chadwick Tyler, 1975, USA, is a fashion / fine-art photographer based in Brooklyn, New York. His work career started in art direction and corporate advertising. In 2005 he began focusing on photography, learning the basic technical competence under the guidance of still-life photographer Larry Wittek. In 2009 he had his first solo exhibition entilted Tiberius. The large exhibition was filled with beautiful female characters in black and white photographs. He played with the themes of ecstasy, hysteria, confusion, lethargy, exhaustion and more expressive emotions. He used 52 models to realise all the images for the show, often in strange positions and showing expressive faces. The result was a strong, refreshing, raw yet classy and brain triggering set of images that challenges contemporary notions of beauty. His photography has been featured in numerous magazines as Dazed and Confused, Grey and AnOther. The first two rows of images come from the portfolio VIII and the last row is Mercedes: Quantum Present.


Website: www.chadwicktyler.com

Tuesday 6 September 2011

Back from Perpignan and another great visit to Visa Pour l’Image… obviously a lot of  fun was had and it did hurt a bit looking at my bank balance this morning …but it was also a productive week or so in terms of showing work and meeting editors….and educational having sat through several photographers’ talks…Chris Morris and Gary Knight to mention just a couple…But if there are two words that really sum up Visa Pour l’Image 2011 for me, they are exhaustion and inspiration…Those were at least the two things on top of my mind landing back in London Monday evening…there were so many things to see and do and the late nights, early rises, and eventful days certainly took their toll…but you also get very inspired attending the evening screenings at Campo Santo or Place Republique, looking at the exhibitions at places like Couvent des Minimes, showing and getting feedback for your work at Palais des Congres, or just talking shop with fellow photographers and other industry types over dinners in some of the many very fine restaurants or over drink at the famous La Poste…or just plain fooling around. All in all, very happy with my second visit to Visa. It was great to catch up with friends I hadn’t seen in a while, as well as make new friends and put some faces to names of people with whom I had only corresponded online before. Verdict: I for one am hoping to make these late-August/early-September visits to Perpignan a lasting tradition…

photo: Barbara Davidson

My festival highlights in terms of looking at work were exhibition of Barbara Davidson’s Pulitzer winning work Caught in the Crossfire about innocent victims of LA gang warfare…and seeing Canon AFJ 2011 recipient Ilvy Njiokiktjien present a very well put-together multimedia version of her award winning series at the Canon stage…hope the video will be online soon somewhere, I’d love to be able to share it…

Before we take look at the latest features, take a moment for this…

Fundraising for Anton Hammerl’s (1969-2011)  3 children…

Friends of Anton | related on BJP

It was unfortunate there was no tribute to Anton during Visa evening screenings as there were for Lucas Dolega, Chris Hondros, and Tim Hetherington,  apparently because Hammerl’s photos had not been released for free due to a misunderstanding (this according to BJP’s Olivier Laurent) …

Features and Essays 

Tenth anniversary of 9/11 in a few days…

Chris Anderson has a great video piece called Ten Years Later on the New Yorker Photo Booth…too bad the stills portfolio only shows 9 frames and doesn’t include some of my favourite stills seen in the video, including the below one…

Christopher Anderson: Ten Years Later | recommended video (The New Yorker: September 2011)

TIME have a gallery of some of James Nachtwey’s well-known as well as previously unpublished 9/11 photos up on Lightbox…

James Nachtwey: Revisiting 9/11: Unpublished Photographs (TIME LB: September 2011)

Damon Winter’s terrific photos of ironworkers at One World Trade Center…

recommended Damon Winter: The Sky Cowboys (NYT: September 2011) Damon Winter interviewed about the series on NYT Lens | Planning the shoot on NYT Magazine 6th Floor blog

Jason Eskenazi: Vanishing Points at Ground Zero (New Yorker: September 2011)

Photo: Patrick Witty

Newsweek: Ten Year Later (Newsweek: September 2011)

Stephane Sednaoui: 9/11 Search and Rescue (TIME LB: September 2011)

Libya…

Moises Saman: Migrants Face the Suspicions and Wrath of Libyan Rebels (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Magnum: Libya (Slate: September 2011)

Surprised to see Ron Haviv’s been shooting with iPhone in Libya…stupidly Vanity Fair Italy have cropped them for their slideshow…

Ron Haviv: Libya (Vanity Fair Italy: August 2011)

Marco Salustro: Last Days of Gaddafi Regime (Photographer’s archive: September 2011)

New features on Haviv’s agency’s site… VII Photo were celebrating theirs tenth anniversary in Perpignan…

Marcus Bleasdale: South African Farm Workers (VII: September 2011)

Ed Kashi: Turkey (VII: September 2011)

Eric Bouvet: Bab al-Aziziya (VII Network: September 2011)

Peter diCampo: The Pajarito Mesa – An Energy Case Study (VII Mentor: September 2011)

Another VII Mentor program photographer, Erin Trieb,  had work on the New Yorker’s Photo Booth… Hipstas…

Erin Trieb: New York Meets Hurricane Irene (New Yorker: August 2011)

Christopher Morris: Beatus (Photographer’s Vimeo: August 2011)

Yuri Kozyrev: The Light of Caucasus (TIME LB: September 2011)

Robert Nickelsberg: Postcard from Brooklyn: Celebrating Eid (The New Yorker: September 2011)

Terrific Perpignan coverage on the NYT Lens blog courtesy of Mr James Estrin….All three below were exhibited at Visa Pour l’Image…

Walter Astrada: Violence Against Women (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Was great to see Shaul Schwarz’s Narco Culture project exhibited… Big fan of the work…I had the opportunity to attend Getty Reportage photographers’ meeting being part of the Emerging Talent, and Shaul showed us the trailer for the feature documentary…Very much looking forward to it…

Shaul Schwarz: Narco Culture (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Jocelyn Bain Hogg: Candid Moments From the British Underworld (NYT Lens: September 2011)

Jonathan Saruk on Reportage site with another not so obvious Kabul subject…the last one was Kabul cinemas if you don’t remember…

Jonathan Saruk: Driving Schools in Kabul (Reportage by Getty Images: September 2011)

Gianmarco Maraviglia: Egypt – A Country in Between (Parallelo Zero: 2011)

Lee Friedlander: America By Car (Guardian: September 2011)

Patrick Smith: Leisure Territories (TIME LB: September 2011)

Daria Tuminas: Ivan and the Moon (Firecracker: September 2011)

Human Endeavour: Degeneration (Foto8: September 2011) Human Endeavour website

Sean Gallagher: The Panda’s Forest (The Atlantic: August 2011)

Interviews

James Nachtwey on 9/11…

James Nachtwey : on 9/11 (TIME: September 2011) video by Marco Grob , interview by Kira Pollack as part of Time Magazine’s  Beyond 9/11 : Portraits of Resilience 

New Yorker contributors Peter van Agtmael, Thomas Dworzak, Platon on how 9/11 shaped their careers…

Peter van Agtmael : September 11th, Ten Years (New Yorker: September 2011)

Thomas Dworzak : September 11th, Ten Years (New Yorker: September 2011)

Platon : September 11th, Ten Years (New Yorker: September 2011)

Lynsey Addario was on CNN on talking about working in Somalia on a recent assignment for Newsweek…(thanks to @tammydavid for pointing me to this piece)

Lynsey Addario (CNN: September 2011)

Great Visa coverage by British Journal of Photography’s La Poste desk…aka Mr Scoop aka Olivier Laurent…here are some of the interviews…

Barbara Davidson : From the Pulitzer to Perpignan (BJP: September 2011)

More on Shaul Schwarz’ and his Narco Culture project…

Shaul Schwarz (BJP: September 2011)

Aidan Sullivan : “The Getty Grants have become a lifeline for photojournalists” (BJP: September 2011)

Stanley Greene (BJP: September 2011)

Yuri Kozyrev : Visa Pour l’Image 2011 (Euronews: September 2011)

Ed Ou : Winner of City of Perpignan Young Reporter Award 2011  (TIME LB: September 2011)

Mike Kamber  : ” I want to carry on the legacy (takepart.com: 2011)

Sebastian Liste (La Lettre: September 2011)

Ron Haviv : Freelance in a World at Risk (1998) (Youtube)

Eirik Johnson (Youtube)

Ed Kashi : Eye-to-eye (NYT Lens: August 2011)

Donovan Wylie (National Medium Museum Vimeo: 2011)

Antoine d’Agata (Vimeo)

‘This Is What I Do. This Is All That I Know.” – Joao Silva

Part of NYT Lens’ Visa coverage…Joao Silva had a show of his Afghanistan work…

Joao Silva (NYT Lens: August 2011)

My favourite frame of Silva’s exhibition made me think of  other  photos I’ve seen of the B52 trails in the Afghan skies…photos which kind of seem to sum up and symbolise for me the long term foreign influence in the country…Of course the US and its allies have been in Afghanistan for 10 years with tens of thousands of boots on the ground…but when you think longer term…How will the last ten years of fight against the Taliban be seen in 20 years… 30 years… or 50 years? With US and its allies planning to reduce their presence in the country, will this most most recent war in Afghanistan be seen just as ‘a 10 years-or-so long in-and-out bomber round’? What has really been achieved?

Below Silva’s frame side-by-side Anderson’s, Knight’s, and Boulat’s…

Two more interviews…

Simon Norfolk (Institute: 2011)

Shannon Stapleton (Reuters blog: 2011)

Articles

Visa news….

Well deserved award for Kozyrev…

BJP: Yuri Kozyrev wins Visa d’Or award

I think Peter Dench nails the Perpignan experience with these videos…

Hungry Eye TV: The Dench Diary at Visa Pour l’Image Day 1 /  Day 2 /Day 3 / Day 4/ Day 5 / Day 6 (Hungry Eye: September 2011)

Visa Pour l’Image: Oliver Jobard Visa d’or Feature Award winner (festival website: September 2011)

Panos Pictures blog: Shiho Fukada Daily Press award at Visa (Panos blog: September 2011)

La Lettre: Guillaume Herbaut : Prix Webdocumentaire 2011 (La Lettre: September 2011)

Getty: Editorial Grants winners (Getty: September 2011)

NYT: Peacekeepers in Somalia Fire on Car, Leaving a Journalist Dead (NYT: September 2011)

photo: James Nachtwey

Life.com: They Were There: 9/11 Photographers (Life.com: September 2011) Related: All life.com’s September 11  galleries

Guardian: The meaning of 9/11′s most controversial photo Thomas Hoepker’s photo of New Yorkers apparently relaxing as the twin towers smoulder says much about history and memory (Guardian: September 2011)

The former executive editor of The New York Times, Bill Keller reassesses his Iraq war support…

photo: Alexandra Boulat

Bill Keller: My Unfinished 9/11 Business (NYT Mag: September 2011)

Tom Junod in Esquire on one of the most iconic 9/11 photographs…

Tom Junod: The Falling Man (Esquire: September 2011)

photo: Sebastian Meyer

BJP: Listening in: The use of audio in photography (BJP: 2011)

10b Photography is a post-production lab in Rome with a very  impressive client list … there’s an interesting piece on their website on the lab’s ethics….

photo: Yuri Kozurev / NOOR . Digital Imaging by 10b Photography

10b Photography: Ethics (10 Photography website)

Errol Morris’ book Seeing is Believing review on New York Times…

NYT: Errol Morris Looks for the Truth in Photography (NYT: September 2011)

NYT Lens: ‘Where Is the Front Page in Cyberspace?’ (NYT Lens: September 2011)

NYT: When the Camera Takes Over for the Eye (NYT: September 2011)

NYT: One Eye on the Door, the Other on His Photography (NYT: September 2011)

CPN: Photographers for Hope (CPN: 2011)

La Lettre: James Nachtwey leaves VII (La Lettre: September 2011)

Guardian: Featured Photojournalist: Jorge Guerrero (Guardian: September 2011)

Magnum: Steve McCurry is the first winner of the newly created Leica Hall of Fame Award (Magnum: September 2011)

“Is photojournalism dead? NO – it’s alive and kicking!”  – Tom Stoddart

Getty Images blog: Visa Pour l’Image (Getty blog: August 2011)

David Campbell: Thinking Images v.21: Seeing the dead (DC blog: September 2011)

Want an overview of the challenges facing photojournalism in the new media economy? See Campbell’s back catalogue

Stephen Mayes and Tim Hetherington on war and sexuality…

Stephen Mayes and Tim Hetherington: Theatre of War or ‘La Petite Mort’ (pdf)  (DC blog: 2011) related

Guardian: The head of photography on… picture manipulation and trust in news imagery Acceptable uses of Photoshop in the Guardian and Grazia (Guardian: September 2011)

Verve: Benjamin Rasmussen (Verve Photo: September 2011)

The Atlantic: The Freelance Surge Is the Industrial Revolution of Our Time (The Atlantic: 2011)

Apps

British Journal of Photography releases iPad App.. I had a chance to see it at Visa and I have to say it does look good!

Info on the magazine’s website: British Journal of Photography comes to the iPad

Sneak preview here

In iTunes Store

The BJP app promises to give  ” readers the highlight features of our print editions together with extra features, photos and a raft of new multimedia and video content, including a moving image cover created by New York-based artists Reed+Rader. “

Issue #1, available free from 7 September, includes:  Exclusive interviews with celebrated portrait photographer Anton Corbijn and acclaimed German film director Wim Wenders on the relationship between still and motion images;  Five photographers, including Tim Walker and Zed Nelson, discuss their first adventures in filmmaking; A special report on the role of photojournalism since 9/11 Q&A with legendary South African photographer David Goldblatt etc. etc..

Reuters is also coming out with their own app for the App…

Reuters: The Wider Image

Also…

Greenpeace releases photography app

Light It Magazine

Awards, Grants, and Competitions

Tim Hetherington Grant by World Press Photo | related on BJP

The PhotoPhilantrophy Activist Award

Aaron Siskind 2011 Individual Photographer’s Fellowships

NGM Photo Contest

College Photographer of the Year

Agencies

Happy 4th Anniversary to NOOR

photo: Robert Christina / Nikon Europe

Institute for Artist Management : Motion page

Crowd funding

Mariella Furrer  : My Piece of Sky: Memories of Child Sexual Abuse (Kickstarter)

Pete Brook : ’Prison Photography’ on the Road: Stories Behind the Photos (Kickstarter)

Blogs

TIME Lightbox Tumblr

Jobs

PDN is hiring a Managing Editor

Senior Technician at Bournemouth

Photographers

Ilvy Njiokiktjien

Nadav Neuhaus

Natasha Fillion

Monique Jaques

Rafael Fabres

Jonathan Saruk

Maximiliano Braun

Allison Shelley

Jonathan Lewis

Gordon Welters

James Chance

Stephen Kosloff

Michael Barrientos

Daphne Plomp

Books and Exhibitions

Michelle Sank : The Submerged : Hot Shoe Gallery : PV 8 September 1830-2100 :  Book published by Schilt Publishing

To finish off…

Portrait photographer charging by weight

Hyères 2011

I’ve just recently returned from the 2011 edition of the Hyères fashion and photography festival which takes place at the Villa Noailles. For those who are not familiar with Hyères (I was not until a couple of years ago) it’s important to note the use of the word “and” between ‘fashion’ and ‘photography’. This is not a fashion photography festival but a festival with two distinct parts. Given that I know next-to-nothing about fashion photography and possibly even less about fashion itself, I wasn’t sure what to expect, but I came back genuinely energised.

Hyères doesn’t have the same visibility as the Rencontres d’Arles and in fairness the festival takes place on a much more intimate scale than the vast sprawl of it’s cousin from up the road. Whereas a lot of the work being presented in Arles is well-known and critically recognised, Hyères functions more like a photographic incubator, both by focusing the competition on emerging young talent and also by exhibiting work that you are unlikely to see elsewhere. For instance the 2011 festival included a selection of Erwin Blumenfeld’s photographs all of which were used as Vogue covers, something you are unlikely to see in a photography museum. After seeing this show and stepping into a newsagents, I couldn’t help feeling that fashion photography as a genre seems to have regressed hugely from the inventiveness and experimentation of Blumenfeld’s era, particularly for established magazines like Vogue.

Anouk Kruithof, The Daily Exhaustion

Anouk Kruithof, The Daily Exhaustion

The core of the photography component of the festival is a group exhibition of a shortlist of 10 emerging photographers, one or several of whom are selected by a jury for a grand prize. A look back at the shortlisted photographers from previous festivals and you are guaranteed to find not only excellent and exciting work and a lot of genuine discoveries. This year was no different, with work by Andrey Bogush, Kim Boske, Emily Hyperion Dubuisson, Katarina Elvén, Anouk Kruithof, Ina Jang, Mårten Lange, Marie Queau, Awoiska van der Molen and Marc Philip van Kempen. Most of the short-listed photographers  have no experience of fashion photography at all and, in addition to the grand prize, a few of them may find themselves trying their hand at it for the first time following Hyères, an exercise which I think would be fascinating for any emerging photographer.

This year’s grand prize winner was the young Dutch photographer Anouk Kruithof. She was selected unanimously by the jury for her inventiveness and her versatility. The series she presented at Hyères, the Daily Exhaustion, is a wonderfully simple idea in an equally wonderfully simple book/zine form, but I also recommend a trip to her website which is full of interesting material. A special mention was also given to Katarina Elvén, a set designer from Sweden who is working on a an ambitious but very thoughtful project relating to surface and aesthetics… one to look out for in the future. I also made another discovery in Hyères, but this one was on the jury rather than the shortlist. Fellow jury member and a photographer, provocateur and penseur, Jason Evans: the man behind the Daily Nice, the New Scent, the terrific Words Without Pictures and much more.

Jury deliberations

Jury deliberations

One particularly refreshing aspect of the festival is the time that is allocated to see each photographer. Portfolio reviews, which appear to be becoming more and more popular, seldom offer more than 20 minutes per review whereas at Hyères jurors spend between anything between 30 minutes and 1h30 with each of the shortlisted photographers, almost enough time for a conversation. But the thing that really makes Hyères stand out from other photography festivals is that it creates a space to consider photography in a different context. Just by combining fashion and photography, the festival is forcing us to reconsider what we think of as photography and offering a reminder of how insular the ‘fine art photography’ world can be. Whether you like fashion photography (or any other applied photography for that matter) or not, it has to be recognised that it is too often dismissed as inferior or just plain ignored by the art photography world. During my four days in Hyères I found myself having more conversations about photography in its many different forms than I have at all the other photography festivals I have attended put together.

Aside from these issues of substance, combine the fact that this all takes place in an absolutely gorgeous 1930s modernist villa on the Mediterranean and and that being on photo-jury duty also involves a collective swim in the Mediterranean and you will understand why Hyères has immediately become a personal favourite.

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