Tag Archives: Execution

Gian Paolo Minelli – Playas

Gian Paolo Minelli’s series “Playas,” depicts empty parking lots in downtown Buenos Aires. More specifically, it depicts the canvas netting that provides shade and protects cars from the occasional hail storm.

© Gian Paolo Minelli from the series "Playas"

When I first saw the series a couple of years ago, I thought the subject matter was cheesy and obvious. Actually, I still feel that way. What’s changed is that now, really looking at the series again, I realize the photos are subtle and finely composed shots of light, pattern and shadow. I think in the end all subjects are cliche at some level. Execution matters most. Here are more jpegs from Minelli’s site. You’ll have to trust me when I say that the 1 meter-sized prints look marvelous.

© Gian Paolo Minelli from the series "Playas"

© Gian Paolo Minelli from the series "Playas"

© Gian Paolo Minelli from the series "Playas"

© Gian Paolo Minelli from the series "Playas"

© Gian Paolo Minelli from the series "Playas"

Previously I wrote about Minelli’s work on Villa Lugano, which I really, really like. Also, I was reminded of Fernando Di Sisto’s work which I recently wrote about.

Favorite Shoots with Elisabeth Biondi

The New Yorker has a wonderful series of images by a number of photographers that discuss their relationship with Elisabeth Biondi, who has been the photo editor at The New Yorker since 1996, soon after the magazine started to use photography, until his recent departure.

“A photograph is an entity. You don’t crop it, you don’t butcher it, you don’t plaster text over it, you treat it with dignity.”

Photograph by Robert Polidori, from “Gorgeous George,” in the issue of March 26th, 2001.

The execution of this photograph permanently changed my working methodology. To be honest, the subject—a temporary lighting treatment on the George Washington Bridge—is something I would never have contemplated shooting on my own. Probably sensing this, Elisabeth got me involved in a conversation in which we both described our mental projections of what the resulting photograph should look like. By the end of our office session I had actually penciled in a crude drawing of the shot that I was to seek.-Robert Polidori (Read more).