Tag Archives: Europe

Paris Photo 2012 Preview: 276 photos on the art market today

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Daniel Naud, Africanis 2, Strydenburg, 1 April 2008
Courtesy of Stevenson, Cape Town and Johannesburg

Lens Culture is pleased to present a high-resolution slideshow preview of 276 photographs that will be featured at Paris Photo 2012 in November. carrera de fotografia . This is the largest and most important photography art fair in Europe so in many ways, this is what the international art market looks like right now for photography. carrera de fotografia .

Pictures of the Week: September 28 – October 5

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From the U.S. presidential debate in Denver and a ferry disaster in Hong Kong to Europe’s unbelievable Ryder Cup comeback in Illinois and a tiger cub at theShanghai Zoo, TIME presents the best pictures of the week.

Matthew Schenning, Homeless Campsite

Matthew Schenning, Homeless Campsite

Matthew Schenning

Homeless Campsite,
Porto, Portugal, 2010
From the Beyond This Point series
Website – Schenning.com

Matthew Schenning is a Brooklyn based photographer originally from Baltimore, MD where he spent his youth playing in the abandoned spaces under highway overpasses. After studying sculpture at the University of Maryland he turned his focus toward photography as a means to understand his relationship to his surroundings. Making most his work while travelling, he photographs the landscape with a large format camera favoring the slow and deliberate way of working. He has been included in many exhibitions both in the United States and Europe. His work was featured in the first edition of The Collector’s Guide to Emerging Art Photography published by the Humble Arts Foundation and most recently in the exhibition catalogue for If This Is It published by Waal-boght Press.

Deborah Parkin, Siblings

Deborah Parkin, Siblings

Deborah Parkin

Siblings,
United Kingdom, 2012
Website – DeborahParkin.com

Deborah Parkin is a photographer based in rural Northumberland, UK. She spent many years in Academia – researching for a Ph.D in Women’s War Writing & teaching as well as gaining an MA in Holocaust Studies. Deborah has always been fascinated with childhood, whether it is recording her own memories of childhood, photographing her own children or other children. In her series Stillness in Time she wanted to photograph children using the wet plate collodion process – a process that requires stillness, the antithesis to the frantic, sometimes pressurized world these children live in. She wanted to record moments of stillness and disengagement from their immediate world. Her work is to be published by Gallery Vevais this summer and is held in collections in the U.S and Europe.

Andrew Phelps, Untitled

Andrew Phelps, Untitled

Andrew Phelps

Untititled,
Higley, Arizona, 2011
From the Haboob series
Website – Andrew-Phelps.com

Andrew Phelps is an American photographer who has been living in Europe since 1990. His work is influenced by the cross-cultural lifestyle he now leads, dividing his time between the deserts of Arizona and the Alps of Austria. Alongside a constant pursuit of new work, Andrew keeps a blog about special edition photography books called BUFFET. Andrew is a member of the Piece of Cake project.

Pictures of the Week: May 11 – May 18

From violence in Colombia and a huge fire in Manila to soccer championships across Europe and the presidential handover ceremony in France, TIME’s photo department presents the best images of the week.

European Coastlines, ‘Moments Before The Flood’

In trying to understand the tension Carl de Keyzer seeks to present in his images of European coastlines, look to the World War II bunkers, tank traps and crumbling walls still present by the shore for starting points.

Lannoo Publishers

Moments Before the Flood

The decaying fortifications, much like the human response to rising ocean tides as examined by de Keyzer in his new book, Moments Before The Flood, are telling. They anticipate a massive threat, but cannot hope to prevent it: rising sea levels that would submerge entire countries in Europe present an overwhelming challenge to which most solutions are futile.

“Once it happens, not one system is going to stop it,” de Keyzer says of the potential results of global warming, which inspired him to begin the project as the media covered climate change with greater frequency. “How high can you build the walls, how much money can you spend on it?”

Although de Keyzer admits that the immediacy of the threat is debatable, the photographer’s compulsion to document what has amounted to more than 80,000 miles of European coastline stems from several motives: to observe life on the coast before it is swept away, examine what is being done to preserve it and underscore the tension that arises from an impending threat that overwhelms even the most ambitious attempts to stop it. Each individual picture displays a different mood and aspect of life by the sea—some desolate, some bucolic, but all foreboding when viewed together.

The project is remarkably thorough; de Keyzer describes working for several years with two assistants who would recommend seaside locations he should photograph, “pinning” thousands of different locations to Google Earth in each country, which the photographer would narrow down and enter into his GPS each time he arrived at a new location. He has been working on the project since 2007 and, to date, the project has taken him to more than 20 countries.

The book includes 200 images with nursery rhymes collected from children across Europe printed alongside the pictures to underscore the traditional notion of the shore as an enjoyable place, and thus one less prepared for the substantial danger of rising tides. De Keyzer’s approach to the project was inspired by the maritime paintings of the 18th century, which showed intense beauty paired with violent subject matter. Though the shipwrecks and sea battles are graphic and expressive, it is the context in which they are displayed that de Keyzer highlights for its dramatic tension. Often, the fearsome scenes hung in a placid living room, above a mantelpiece, or in a quiet museum gallery.

“It’s being neutralized. It becomes a commodity,” de Keyzer warns, speaking of the relationship between the decontextualized art and our reaction to the threat of rising tides. “That could mean that you no longer have to worry about it, because it’s there and it’s not real anymore.”

Moments Before The Flood is published by Lannoo, in conjunction with a waterfront exhibition in Ostend, Belgium, on view from May 17 – August 26. 

SPECIAL OFFER DURING THE LAST 50 OF 500

450 of 500 Photographers have been featured on this website. 9/10th completed and 1/10th still to come.
To celebrate this milestone I would like to make you an offer you can’t refuse. During the period of the next 50 photographers up until the completion of this website I’m offering my personal and signed photography book ‘I believe in 88’ at a 38% discount; it’s an opportunity to support this website. Update 27-04: The package includes some cool 500 Photographers stickers.

Short project statement: “After a violent encounter with a group of neo-nazis at the age of 14 where Pieter Wisse was stabbed in the stomach, he decided to take a closer look at the daily life of the people who call themselves neo-nazis in former East Germany, a group of people at the edge of our society.”


Introduction by Klaus Farin | 24x32cm | Hardcover | 96 Pages | Edition of 1000 copies

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