Tag Archives: Eugene Richards

Art for Sandy Relief: Iconic, Collectible Photographs to Benefit Hurricane Sandy Relief

20×200, in collaboration with TIME’s photography editors, has launched Art for Sandy Relief, a curated collection of Hurricane Sandy benefit editions. The photographs showcase both milestones and the mundane, characterizing the ever-changing and now ever-changed landscape of the authentic New York. Art for Sandy Relief comprises one of the largest art-fundraising efforts for Sandy to date. Twelve photographs in all, these museum-quality prints of New York and New Jersey are available until Dec. 16th.

“It’s an incredible honor to collaborate with TIME’s photography editors who have handled Sandy coverage with such grace and impact,” says Jen Bekman, 20×200’s founder and New York native. “We’re also thrilled to work with so many legendary photographers in service to a cause so close to us. This initiative is particularly significant to the 20×200 team since we are a New York City-based business and so eager to contribute to the rebuilding of the region. Partnering with artists to support institutions and causes that we believe in has been an important aspect of our program since its inception in 2007. This project is an extension of that practice, amplified considerably with the incredible resources and support from TIME.”

The images are works by notable artists; each reference the storms’ impact indirectly and are affecting works suitable for hanging in the home or as an addition to an existing collection. From a dramatic black-and-white ‘30s Manhattan cityscape by Alfred Eisenstaedt via the LIFE Picture Collection to a ‘70s Staten Island sunbather by Christine Osinski, these photographs are instantly iconic, reminders of all that seeks revitalization in the regions hit hardest by Hurricane Sandy.

These 12 archival prints are priced from $60 for an 11″x14″ print to $10,000 for a 60″x80″ print. To maximize the amount donated, all net proceeds from these special benefit editions will go to six local charities: Architecture for Humanity New York and New Jersey, Hurricane Sandy New Jersey Relief Fund, Project Hospitality with the Staten Island Advance, Donors Choose Fund to Help Schools Impacted by Hurricane Sandy, Safe Space, and Red Hook Initiative Hurricane Relief Fund. These specialized organizations are dedicated to repairing infrastructure, helping schools and businesses get back up and running, and rebuilding family homes in the communities directly affected by the hurricane.

TIME has deployed reporters and photographers throughout the tri-state area since Sandy hit. Also, TIME’s parent company, Time Warner, has contributed $1 million to relief and recovery charities already. Richard Stengel, TIME’s managing editor, announced Art for Sandy Relief in his editor’s letter in the magazine that hits newsstands Monday, November 19th, saying, “In addition to documenting the devastation, we are determined to help those affected by it.”

Visit 20×200.com/time for more information on the photographs being offered. All images are available only until Dec. 16th.

Sandy’s Aftermath: Devastation in Staten Island by Eugene Richards

TIME assigned photographer Eugene Richards to document the devastation on Staten Island following Superstorm Sandy. Over four days, Richards recorded the total destruction in the communities along the island’s South Shore, illustrating the storm’s deep impact across the entire borough.

Richards spoke to LightBox producer Vaughn Wallace about his experience on assignment. Their conversation has been edited.

Vaughn Wallace: Talk to me about first arriving on Staten Island.

Eugene Richards: The first set of pictures that we had are out in a swamp. It was a very surreal marsh, covered with what looked like totally submerged houses. About a half mile into this area, we found this woman — totally alone — standing there. Her name was Susan. I didn’t want to intrude — I think she was trying to contemplate the tragedy, the same way everybody is. She proceeded to kneel down on what was the roof of her father’s house…over one of the rooms.

Little American flags were appearing all over the place on Staten Island — I think out of desperation. Also I think it was a protest, because people were getting very angry at what they felt was a lack of services. I’d say 30% of the homes had flags on them in some capacity. They kept popping up – people would try to find flags and raise them on broomsticks in the middle of the street.

VW: You saw the flags as symbols of protest?

ER: As symbols of defiance. We were talking constantly with people about how the mood was so scarily positive. Everyone else said it was just positive, but we thought that underneath it was a level of shock that will settle in — people were working to help each other non-stop.

This area seemed like a neighborhood of particularly hardworking and professional people — they set to work right away, tearing out the insides of their houses with an energy that was amazing. They reminded me of worker bees. They were working very, very hard until the homes ultimately became shells.

VW: In some of these photographs, we see what you’re referencing. But what can we not see?

ER: What you can’t see in the photographs is the language. One of the more revealing pictures is of a man named Kevin working on Cedar Grove Ave. We went up to his house and there was a flag out front and a note about the marathon to people in the neighborhood — everyone was very mad that the marathon was going to happen.

And then out of the basement came this guy. We were very shy about approaching him — covered with dirt, steam coming off his head in the cold, with he and his wife cleaning out their entire house onto the pavement. He chose to write ‘Thanks Sandy’ on his house rather than the profanity that many would have written.

This is the way everyone was — [an attitude] you can’t see in the pictures. To feel the graciousness of everyone was surprising. Nobody was telling jokes, nobody was laughing, but there was much kindness. That’s what doesn’t show here: the calm utility of the people.

VW: How would you describe the disaster you witnessed over the weekend?

ER: In many cases, I think it’s the end of a way of life — the innocence is gone. Cedar Grove Beach — it was kind of a secret. You were close to the beach and it was beautiful…a very special opportunity for people who aren’t particularly wealthy to live a pretty good life.

Maybe that’s what speaks to us all. I don’t know about you, but the dream of all of us is to have a house on the beach. It’s my dream. I think that’s what speaks to a lot of people — these residents in their own way managed to live this dream and this is the result of it.

VW: You’ve photographed conflict and sadness throughout your career. How does this disaster compare to things you’ve witnessed elsewhere?

ER: It was different. Acceptance, first off, that this was nature — not a man-made tragedy. On the other hand, the difference is that people in other places I’ve gone to have nothing. These people [on Staten Island] had 20 to 30 years of things they’ve worked their asses off to have…the bulk of people were concerned with their photographs and irreplaceable personal things. The prom pictures, the family pictures, the few things they had left over from their heritage, their parents. That kind of thing was gone — much more devastating than anything else.

VW: One of your more powerful images is a pinboard of family photos that people had pulled out of the rubble.

ER: Curiously, I think in a way that the photographs have taken on another meaning, like proof that they exist in a certain way as people. Photographs have taken on a totem quality in our society, maybe more than they should. The photos do have a significance — that we exist and we have roots.

We were there when a man found a picture of his friend who died in 9/11 – a little snapshot. So he was very exceedingly happy.

VW: So in some ways, these photographs are proof of existence and proof of what used to be. Your photographs, then, amplify what these found objects are already saying.

ER: I think they were pleased that someone recognized they were alive.


Eugene Richards is an award-winning American photographer. LightBox previously featured his project and book, ‘War is Personal.’

Vaughn Wallace is the producer of LightBox. Follow him on Twitter @vaughnwallace.

More photos: The Toil After the Storm: Life in Sandy’s Wake



Features and Essays | October 2012

Love this Cuba feature by Paolo Pellegrin for the National Geographic Magazine. Published in the November issue.

Photo © Paolo Pellegrin

Paolo Pellegrin: Cuba’s New Now (NGM) After half a century under Castro, Cubans feel a wary sense of possibility. But this time, don’t expect a revolution.

Also in the latest National Geographic Magazine issue…Eugene Richards from Arkansas Delta… his feature mixes current work with photos from the early 70s.

Photo © Eugene Richards

Eugene Richards: Return to the Arkansas Delta (NGM) The delta west of the Mississippi River was once a place where sharecroppers lived in segregation and poverty yet forged a vibrant community. Industrial farming has erased their culture, leaving behind endless sky and few people. Eugene Richards documented their world four decades ago. Now he returns to where his pictures began.

Dominic Nahr’s recent Somalia work shot for Time, now on his agency’s website.

Photo © Dominic Nahr

Dominic Nahr: Scarred Somalia’s War on al-Qaeda (Magnum)

Abbie Trayler-Smith: The Ladies of Guera (Panos) Chad

Kate Holt: Inside Somalia: Violence Against Women and Girls (Guardian) multimedia

New work by Stephanie Sinclair on her child brides project.

Photo © Stephanie Sinclair

Stephanie Sinclair: Trading Childhood for Marriage (CNN)

Jessica Dimmock short film on the same young woman…

Jessica Dimmock: Too Young to Wed: Destaye (Vimeo)

Some of Sinclair’s Child Brides in Politiken…

Stephanie Sinclair: Child Brides (Politiken)

Jerome Delay: Niger’s Hunger Brides (Guardian)

Mads Nissen: A Silent Libya After Gadhafi (CNN)

Louis Quail: Libya: Life After Gaddafi (Guardian)

Ben Lowy: iLibya: Growing Pains (Reportage by Getty Images)

Ben Lowy: iLibya (Mother Jones)

Ilvy Njiokiktjien: Afrikaner Blood (Politiken) multimedia

Nicola Lo Calzo: Slavery’s Ghosts (Newsweek)

James Oatway: A Tale of Two Angolas (Panos)

Kieran Doherty: Daily Life in Liberia (Guardian)

Pierre Crocquet: Confronting Childhood Sexual Abuse (NYT Lens)

Magnum nominee Jerome Sessini has been documenting violence in Culiacan, Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez in Mexico for years… He has a book titled The Wrong Side coming out in spring 2013… Some of the work in CNN photo blog..

Photo © Jerome Sessini

Jerome Sessini: The wrong side’ of the Mexican border (CNN)

David Rochkind: Mexico’s drug war ‘impossible to ignore’ (CNN)

Matt Black: After the Fall (NYT Lens) Mexico

Matt King: Being Strong – Growing up with Violence in Mexico (Foto8)

Miguel Alvarez Bravo: retrospective (Lightbox)

Oscar B. Castillo had a terrific slideshow on Lightbox just before the recent Venezuelan presidential elections…

Photo © Oscar B. Castillo

Oscar B. Castillo: The Street Gangs of Caracas (Lightbox)

Meridith Kohut: Portraits of Chavez Supporters (NYT)

Tomas Munita: Chile’s Challenge on Easter Island (NYT)

Stephen Ferry: Violentology: Colombian Conflict (Lightbox)

Yuri Kozyrev: The Occupation of the Belo Monte Dam (NOOR) Brazil

Miquel Dewever-Plana (photographer) Isabelle Fougere (writer): Alma: A Tale of Guatemala’s Violence (Lightbox)

Jorge Dan Lopez: Thieves face lynch mob (Reuters) Guatemala City | related: photographer’s blog post

Time Lightbox recently shared a 100+ image edit of chief White House photographer Pete Souza’s work on the Obama presidency… I guess I should probably take these images with a grain of salt in the journalistic sense considering he is employed by the administration he is documenting, but I do find the work fascinating…It’s a great historical record…with loads of really terrific frames…

Photo © Pete Souza/White House

Pete Souza: Portrait of a Presidency (Lightbox)

Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath photos in New Yorker Photo Booth by various photographers…

New Yorker: Hurricane Sandy in Photos (Photo Booth)  Sandy’s Aftermath, NYC (Photo Booth) After Sandy in Manhattan And The Rockaways (Photo Booth)

Time sent five photographers to document the hurricane…

Time (photographers Michael Christopher Brown, Benjamin Lowy, Ed Kashi, Andrew Quilty and Stephen Wilkes): In the Eye of the Storm: Capturing Sandy’s Wrath (Lightbox)

Shaul Schwarz shot Sandy for NBC News.

Shaul Schwarz: Sandy’s path of destruction leaves mark on Brooklyn (NBC News)

Photo © Joe Amon

Joe Amon: Heroin in Denver : The Story of Alice and Iris (Denver Post)

Andrew Hetherington: Inside the Pot Industrial Complex (Newsweek)

Ashley Gilbertson: Incarceration’s Stigma – Mercedes Smith (VII)

Ron Haviv: Incarceration’s Stigma – Ronald Day (VII)

Brenda Ann Kenneally: Sharing Life and Liquor on a Changing Bushwick Street (NYT Lens)

Brenda Ann Kenneally: In Drug-Riddled Bushwick, Revisiting a Steadfast Friend (NYT Lens)

21st century FSA…

Photo © Andrew Lichtenstein

Andrew Lichtenstein: An American Place (Facing Change)

Gary Knight: Inmigracion Topografia (VII)

Marc Asnin: Embracing Uncle Charlie (CNN)

Brendan Hoffman: Middle-class America searches for new identity (CNN)

Bryan Schutmaat: Beauty, sorrow of American West (CNN)

NYT (various photographers): Fracking (NYT Lens)

Jan Banning: Down and Out in the South (CNN)

Don Doll: Native Americans (NYT Lens)

Really like the below shot by Christopher Anderson of VP Biden… Shame there’s only half a dozen photos in the series on Magnum website…

Photo © Christopher Anderson

Christopher Anderson: Joe Biden (Magnum)

Christopher Anderson: A Political Portfolio (New York magazine)

Charles Ommanney: Romney in Florida (Newsweek)

Peter Bohler: From the Campaign Trail with Paul Ryan (Lightbox)

Christopher Morris: Republican Faces (VII)

Brendan Hoffman: Photos of What It Looks Like To Be a Democrat (PhotoShelter)

Greta Pratt: Looking Presidential (NYT Lens)

Robert Leslie: A Photographic Road Trip Through a Familiar Superpower (NYT Lens)

Benedict Evans: Behind the Scenes of Platon’s “Adversaries” (New Yorker)

Alec Soth: Looking for Love (Lightbox)

Lauren Fleishman: Wheelchair Bodybuilders (Lightbox)

Brian Frank: Mixed Martial Arts (NYT Lens)

Mark Lyon: Staring at the Wall, Encountering Nature (NYT Lens)

Stephen Morton: Geechees Fragile Culture (zReportage)

Rick Sforza: Shrinking Sea (zReportage)

Pat Vasquez-Cunningham: Sacred Mountain Threatened (zReportage)

Photo © Cedric Gerbehaye

Cedric Gerbehaye: Belgium: A Country in Flux (Lightbox)

Charles Ommanney: Made in France (Newsweek)

Andrea Frazzetta: The Enchanted Island of Centenarians (NYT Magazine)

Adam Ferguson shot Greece’s continuing economic crisis for the New York Times…

Photo © Adam Ferguson

Adam Ferguson: Lean Times in Greece as Government Cuts More Spending (NYT) entire edit in VII archive here. Also on offer in colour, which I actually personally slightly prefer.

Zalmai: In Restive Greece, Afghans Greeted by Xenophobia (NYT Lens)

Tom Jamieson: On Europe’s Border (Emaj Magazine) Greece

Andrea Gjestvang: One Day in History (Moment agency archive) Portraits of young people who survived the massacre at the summer camp of Norwegian Labour Youths (AUF), on the island of Utøya outside Oslo on July 22nd 2011

Peter Marlow: Morning glory: England’s cathedrals (FT)

Arnhel de Serra: Rural Britannia (New Yorker)

Maciej Dakowicz: Cardiff After Dark (Guardian)

Jocelyn Bain Hogg: Mr. English Beauty (CNN)

Tom Wood: Men and Women (Guardian) UK

Birte Kaufmann: Ireland’s Biggest Minority Group (CNN)

Kuba Kaminski: The Whisperers (NYT Lens) Poland

Piotr Malecki: Commuters (Panos) Poland

I found Alex Majoli’s Paris Fashion Week series to be a proper visual treat… and not talking about the models here…Stylish edgy frames…

Photo © Alex Majoli

Alex Majoli: 2012 Paris Fashion Week (Magnum) different edit on New York Magazine

Artur Conka: The Roma of Lunik IX (Foto8) Slovakia

Lukasz Trzcinski: New Europe. Atlas (NYT Lens)

Landon Nordeman: Euro Dog 2012 (New Yorker) Romania

Joanna Nottebrock and Insa Cathérine Hagemann: Meet the Undertakers (CNN)

Photo © Michael Chelbin

Michael Chelbin: Sailboats and Swans: The Prisons of Russia and Ukraine (Lightbox)

Platon: A Russia for All Russians (Newsweek)

Yanina Shevchenko: Crossing Over – A Trans-Siberian Railway Journey (Foto8)

Misha Friedman: Tuberculosis in the Former Soviet Union (burn)

Colin Delfosse: Les cadets de Mourmansk (Picture Tank)

Spanish photographer Maysun is a new name to me… Seen plenty of strong Syria work from her recently.

Photo © Maysun

Maysun: Syria’s Civil Conflict (Guardian)

Jerome Sessini: Syria (Le Monde)

Photo © Daniel Etter

Daniel Etter: Daily Life in Syria (Newsweek)

Zac Baillie: Syria (Paris Match)

Manu Brabo: The fragility of life in Syria’s borderlands (NBC News)

Bryan Denton: Syria’s War Edges Closer to Turkey (NYT)

Giulio Piscitelli: Aleppo (Photographer’s website)

Uriel Sinai: A Tattoo To Remember (NYT) Israel

Adam Ferguson: In Postwar Iraq, Neither War Nor Peace (NYT Lens)

Jenna Krajeski: A Long Border: Refugees in Iraq Kurdistan (Pulitzer Center)

Photo © Mathias Depardon

Mathias Depardon: Black Sea Postcards (Foto8)

Davide Monteleone: Red Thistle (Lightbox) Caucasus

Toufic Beyhum: Mecca Pilgrimage: Ka’aba, Crowds and Construction (Wired) Saudi Arabia

Carolyn Drake: A Bird in the Hand (Panos) Cyprus

Laura El-Tantawy: The Veil (VII Magazine)

Pyhäjärvi, Finland (Horse and Barn), 1981 © Pentti Sammallahti

Pentti Sammallahti: Here, Far Away – retrospective (Guardian)

George Steinmetz: Sailing the Dunes (NGM) Photographer George Steinmetz has flown over every extreme desert, guided by the shifting sand.

Julian Germain: Classroom Portraits (Lightbox)

Mark Henley: A Sign of Our Times (Panos)

Photo © Pieter ten Hoopen

Pieter ten Hoopen: Wandering in Japan’s ‘Suicide Forest’ (NYT Lens)

Jason Florio: Fighters of the longest war (CNN) The Karen people of Myanmar have been embattled in a civil war with the country’s central government since 1949. It is considered the world’s longest ongoing war.

John Vink: Cambodia: King Norodom Sihanouk Funeral (Photographer’s website)

Photo © Poulomi Basu

Poulomi Basu: On India’s Border, a Changing of the Guard (NYT Lens)

Vivek Singh: Aftermath of ethnic riots in India (CNN)

Alex Masi: A Toxic Tragegy in Bhopal (CNN)

Albertina d’Urso: Sculpting gods from clay (CNN) For centuries, artisans have been crafting statues of Hindu deities on the banks of the Hooghly River in Kolkata, India.

Massimo Berruti’s Pakistan work, for which he received a $5,000 W. Eugene Smith Fellowship this year…

Photo © Massimo Berruti

Massimo Berruti: Pakistan: Fade Into Dust (burn)

Mauricio Lima: Afghans Wary in Push for Mineral Riches (NYT)

John D. McHugh: The People of Afghanistan (Reportage)

Mikhail Galustov: Afghan Faces (New Yorker)

Beijing-based British photographer Sean Gallagher continues his commitment to covering environmental issues…

Photo © Sean Gallagher

Sean Gallagher: Climate change on the Tibetan Plateau (CNN)

Sean Gallagher: China’s Three Rivers, Asia’s Threatened Headwaters (Pulitzer Center)

Nadav Kander: Yangtze – The Long River (NYT Lens)

Sim Chi Yin: In the Shadow’s of Shanghai’s Skyscrapers (BusinessWeek)

James Whitlow Delano: Growth (Chinafile.com) China

Lucas Schifres: Made in China (NYT Lens)

Eric Michael Johnson: Pedaling Under Shanghai’s Stars (WSJ)

Kim Hong-Ji: South Korea’s ‘baby boxes’ (Guardian)

Matthew Niederhauser: K-Pop Star (New Yorker) South Korea

Bharat Sikka: Bhutan (Lightbox)

Stephen Dupont: Portraits of Papua New Guinea Gangsters (Lightbox)

Articles | Sunday 17 June 2012

Let’s start with the unexpected news coming from Getty Images: Eugene Richards, the celebrated documentary photographer, has left the Reportage agency. Richards used to be with Magnum Photos but left twice. He was also with VII Photo for a couple of years, and had joined Reportage in 2010.

Reportage by Getty Images: Eugene Richards

BJP: Eugene Richards leaves Reportage by Getty Images

On the subject of Getty Images, they announced a few things these past few weeks.

PetaPixel: Getty Images Changes Watermark from Annoying Logo to Useful Shortlink

PDN Pulse: Getty Images Preps for IPO?

An interesting development in the photographic and multimedia markets, Brian Storm has started charging for some of MediaStorm’s presentation. Rite of Passage by Maggie Steber and A Shadow Remains by Phillip Toledano are the first two pieces to test MediaStorm’s Pay Per Story scheme. Each story can be bought for $1.99.

 

MediaStorm: Why We Switched to a Pay Per Story Model

PDN Pulse: MediaStorm Now Charging to View its Stories

TIME Lightbox: Game Changer – MediaStorm Launches Pay-Per-Story Video Player

Duckrabbit: Maggie Steber responds to critics of MediaStorm’s new pay to view model

VII Photo has been weathering a controversy lately…

VII Photo: Statement

Ron Haviv: Response

Conscientious: Quality journalism, photography and integrity

David Campbell: Photo agencies and ethics: the individual and the collective

And when we’re on the subject of VII Photo, they have also added four young photographers to their mentor programme.

Now, let’s share some business and practical tips:

Justin Mott: Advice to Veteran Photographers

A Photo Editor: How does a photographer land an agent?

A Photo Editor: Pricing & Negotiation: Spokesperson Advertising Shoot

PhotoShelter: A Photographer’s Guide to a Successful Gallery Opening

PhotoShelter: What Buyers and Photo Editors Want

PhotoShelter: Personality Traits & Skills Photo Buyers Don’t Want in Photographers

Salon: How to stop the bleeding

Chris Hondros. Image © Nicole Tung

PetaPixel: US Department of Justice Defends Photographers’ Right to Record Police

Some thoughts about the industry, reviews and round-ups…

The New York Times: Just When You Got Digital Technology, Film is Back

TIME Lightbox: Three War Photographers: Feel Fear, Keep Going

NY Daily News: Iconic ‘napalm girl’ photo from Vietnam War turns 40

Peter Dench: The Dench Diary (December – February 2012)

Conscientious: Review of Unknown Quantities by Olivia Arthur, Dominic Nahr, Moises Saman, and Peter Van Agtmael

PhotoShelter: The Look3 Festival Round-Up

TIME Lightbox: Curators Look Ahead to Look3

PDN Pulse: Look3 – Alex Webb on his Creative Process, Kodachrome, and Magnum

PDN Pulse: Look 3 Report: Donna Ferrato on Philip Jones Griffiths, Don McCullin, and Complicated Relationships

Reuters Blog: The Secret Handshake

The Guardian: Burtynsky: Oil review

Image © Edward Burtynsky.

The Guardian: The Photographers’ Gallery Reopens

NYT Lens Blog: Caught Between the Protests and the Police

NYT Lens Blog: Half Photos, Striving to be More

NYT Lens Blog: A Gift to New York from Gordon Parks

The New Yorker Photo Booth: Great Mistakes: Olivia Arthur

The Guardian: Featured Photojournalist – Joe Raedle

Conscientious Extended: Photography and Place: Appalachia

One Image at a Time: Image #4, Comfort Women 1996

DVAPhoto: Worth a look: Revolution Revisited by Kim Komenich and University of Miami multimedia grad students

Press Association: Jacobs in administration

Verve Photo: Antonio Bolfo

The Guardian: Lawrence Schiller’s best photograph: Marilyn Monroe

TIME Lightbox: Photographs of the ‘Great British Public’ in London

Foam Blog: Ahmet Polat on Instagram

Reuters Blog: Tribute to Danilo Krstanovic

And to finish…

The Marie Colvin Memorial Fund.

apertureWEEK: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

Aperture’s Week in Review: Online Photography Reading Shortlist

Aperture aggregates the best posts from this past week in the photography blogosphere.

  • LensBlog explores why Rodrigo Abd‘s photograph of a young Syrian boy expressing grief over the death of his father landed on the front page of three of the most prominent national papers in the United States.

 

One Year Later: The Story of Eugene Richards’ ‘War is Personal’ Continues

When the current incarnation of LightBox launched a year ago today, one of our very first posts featured the work of Eugene Richards, an American photographer who had released a book documenting the impact of the Iraq War on soldiers and their families. It’s been years since the book, War is Personal, hit shelves in September 2010, and even longer since Richards completed the project. In honor of that anniversary, LightBox caught up with Richards to discuss the way that photographs can follow a photographer.With War is Personal, Richards has found that it’s not just the images that draw him back in. “When you do a project like this, people keep occasionally popping back into your life,” he says.

Some of the subjects of the book have fallen out of touch with the photographer, while others he leaves alone, for now at least, feeling that it would be an intrusion to contact them before they want to be contacted. Still, others are still very much involved in the afterlife of the project. Richards knows that one combat medic featured in the project, suicidal at the time, has started law school and is doing well. Another of the subjects, already confined to a wheelchair, has seen his health deteriorate further in the months that have passed. And in one situation, Richards’ involvement with his subjects has gone past keeping tabs. Carlos Arredondo, featured in War is Personal as the father of a deceased soldier and as an antiwar activist, recently lost another son, Brian, to suicide. Because the Arredondo family was in financial trouble, and because the self-published War is Personal sold better than Richards had expected, the photographer and his team—along with the Nation Institute, which had given Richards a fellowship to work on the project—helped defray the cost of Brian’s funeral. The photographs in the gallery above were taken in the days around that event.

Eugene Richards

Carlos Arredondo holds a photograph of his son Alex. From Eugene Ricards’ September 2010 book War Is Personal.

“The grief really took over Brian,” Arredondo told Richards. “But it’s not only those people who kill themselves who are suffering, but los familios.”

Richards, who already began two new projects in the past year, says he tries not to revisit stories after he finishes them. “I think all journalists try not to,” he says, “but then they come back to you, again and again and again.”

On one level, they come back as people, like the Arredondo family. On another, the stories come back as a consequence of the photographer’s immersion in the subject. Following an idea for long enough to create a large project about it means that the facts and emotions of its world become so familiar that, Richards says, they start to seep into every aspect of life. Something only tangentially related to a photograph taken a year or two years or twenty years ago can provoke the old perspective. “Suddenly you’re back to where you were at a different time,” says Richards.

Richards hasn’t taken any other additional photographs of the families from War is Personal, but he says he will probably return to the subject of war’s impact. Richards says he can’t turn away from people who are open to his journalistic curiosity and his camera’s presence. After all, there is no shortage of reasons to continue to snap away, no shortage of families affected by the country’s evolving military situation.

“This is the next round of response now that the declaration of war here is over, and perhaps people will come back from Afghanistan,” he predicts. “Concerns are going to grow and grow.”

Eugene Richards is an award-winning American photographer. See more of his work here.

Watch LightBox’s video about War is Personal here.

Happy Birthday, LightBox: A Year of Great Photography

In its first year, TIME’s photography blog, LightBox, has published well over 500 posts—an average of ten a week. We hope that the strength of LightBox has not only been evident in the quality of the work but also in the variety of photography showcased.

The site’s intent was established from the first post, a multimedia piece about Eugene Richards’ eloquent and moving War is Personal. Original essays by TIME’s contract photographers, most notably James Nachtwey in Japan and Yuri Kozyrev in Libya, set the bar for LightBox in its first weeks—and for photojournalism in general—in an unprecedented year of extraordinary consequence.

Alongside the work of art world luminaries including Rineke Dijkstra and Cindy Sherman was an essay on poverty by Joakim Eskildsen, which continued the tradition of publishing original work, commissioned for TIME, on the site. The eclectic mix of photography published on LightBox has ranged from rediscovered buried treasures (like the work of Joseph Szabo and Stephane Sednaoui) to stories supporting the work of young photographers, through pieces on the Magnum Foundation Emergency Fund and profiles of photographers like Justin Maxon and Krisanne Johnson, as well the Next Generation photo contest. Alongside the work of professionals both young and old, there was work by amateur practitioners—an astronaut photographer, an accountant photographer of the homeless and the wonderful photographic memories of 1960s pre-Gaddafi Libya by Jehad Nga’s father. There have been the crowd-pleasing, unpublished photos of Johnny Cash and creative galleries edited from the wires, including Two Takes and Surprising Photos. And, of course, there was the daunting undertaking of 365: A Year in Photographs.

In the gallery above, some of TIME’s photo editors reflect on a year of tremendous images and recommend posts that are worth a second look. We’ll also be highlighting selections from more of the staff behind LightBox throughout the day on our Tumblr blog. We welcome suggestions from our readers as well, either in the comments below or on Twitter.

From all of us at LightBox, thanks for being a part of our beginning—and here’s to another year of great photography!