Tag Archives: Esquire

Christopher Churchill, Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.

Christopher Churchill, Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.

Christopher Churchill

Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.,
Ponca City, Oklahoma, 2009
Website – ChristopherChurchill.com

Christopher Churchill (b. 1977) works as a fine art and commissioned photographer based in New England. His photographs are held in various permanent collections that include The Corcoran Gallery of Art, The Center for Creative Photography, The High Museum of Art, The J. Paul Getty Museum, MFA Boston, MFA Houston, The Museum of Contemporary Photography and The Smithsonian. His first monograph American Faith, was published in 2012 by Nazraeli Press and the Joy of Giving Something. In 2010 he was named to the Critical Mass top 50. He had had the good fortune of working with a variety of clients that include Budweiser, Businessweek, Esquire, Fast Co., Inc., GQ, Liberty Mutual, Newsweek, NYTimes Magazine, Stern, Time, Travel & Leisure, Salvation Army and PBS. He lives outside of Boston with his wife and two daughters.  

Christopher Churchill, Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.

Christopher Churchill, Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.

Christopher Churchill

Thomas Putnam and Thomas Putnam Jr.,
Ponca City, Oklahoma, 2009
Website – ChristopherChurchill.com

Christopher Churchill (b. 1977) works as a fine art and commissioned photographer based in New England. His photographs are held in various permanent collections that include The Corcoran Gallery of Art, The Center for Creative Photography, The High Museum of Art, The J. Paul Getty Museum, MFA Boston, MFA Houston, The Museum of Contemporary Photography and The Smithsonian. His first monograph American Faith, was published in 2012 by Nazraeli Press and the Joy of Giving Something. In 2010 he was named to the Critical Mass top 50. He had had the good fortune of working with a variety of clients that include Budweiser, Businessweek, Esquire, Fast Co., Inc., GQ, Liberty Mutual, Newsweek, NYTimes Magazine, Stern, Time, Travel & Leisure, Salvation Army and PBS. He lives outside of Boston with his wife and two daughters.  

Ulric Collette


Canadian photographer Ulric Collette seeks to answer the question: How much do you and your family members really look alike? with his series, Genetic Portraits.  Ulric is a Quebec-based graphic designer and photographer is exploring the genetic similarities between different members of the same family (fathers and sons, mothers and daugthers, brothers, sisters, etc). 
By splitting their faces in half and then blending them together in a single face, he highlights the mysteries of genetic resemblances and differences and create interesting new people that are sometimes quite normal looking and other times far from it.  If faces might somehow reveal something about the character of a person, perhaps Ulric’s hybrid family portraits suggest that they also give an insight to the nature of our families. 
Ulric works as an art director for Collette, an advertising studio in Quebec city. Ulric’s work has been featured in magazines and books all over the world (Prism, Global Investor, Esquire, Lumière et Lens, Snap, Fubiz, My Modern Met, Plateform, Adobe, Explora, New York Daily News, Discovery Chanel, etc). Most recently, his work on the genetic serie was shortlisted in the world most prestigious advertising awards show, the Cannes Lion. 

Max Sher, Nikita Beketov, 21, student, fan of the series Brak po Zaveshaniu (Marriage by Will)

Max Sher, Nikita Beketov, 21, student, fan of the series Brak po Zaveshaniu (Marriage by Will)

Max Sher

Nikita Beketov, 21, student, fan of the series Brak po Zaveshaniu (Marriage by Will),
, 2012
Website – MaxSher.com

Born in St. Petersburg, raised in Siberia and educated in Siberia and France, Max Sher took up photography in 2006. His work (personal and commissioned) has since appeared in Courrier International, Monocle, Esquire (Russia), le Monde, Libération, Ogoniok, Independent Magazine, Afisha, Bolshoi Gorod, Russian Reporter, Snob, GEO Traveler, Foto8, Private, Newsweek Japan, etc. and was exhibited in St.Petersburg, Vienna, Moscow, Bratislava, among others. Max was nominated for KLM Paul Huf Awards in 2008. He is currently based in Moscow.

Photographer #436: Corey Arnold

Corey Arnold, 1976, USA, is an Alaskan commercial fisherman as well as a documentary photographer. He received a BFA in photography at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. In 2011 he released the book Fish-Work: The Bering Sea which includes images that were made between 2003 and 2010 while he was working as a deckhand on the Bering Sea crabber f/v Rollo. The series Fish-Work doesn’t stop there, it is a life long project and has also taken him to various European countries capturing the lifestyle of fishermen. One of his latest series is Wolf Tide which includes a mixture of experiences as a fisherman, rural encounters with unsuspecting wildlife and dramatic landscapes. Nowadays he captains a wild salmon gillnetting operation in Bristol Bay while working on photo assignments and gallery exhibitions in the off season. His work has appeared in numerous magazines as The New Yorker, Esquire and Juxtapoz. In 2009 he was named one of the PDN’s top 30 emerging photographers. The following images come from the series Wolf Tide, Fish-Work Bering Sea and Graveyard Point.


Website: www.coreyfishes.com

Max Sher, Untitled

Max Sher, Untitled

Max Sher

Untitled,
Atyrau, Kazakhstan, 2011
From the Landscapes series
Website – MaxSher.com

Born in St. Petersburg, raised in Siberia and educated in Siberia and France, Max Sher took up photography in 2006. His work (personal and commissioned) has since appeared in Courrier International, Monocle, Esquire (Russia), le Monde, Libération, Ogoniok, Independent Magazine, Afisha, Bolshoi Gorod, Russian Reporter, Snob, GEO Traveler, Foto8, Private, Newsweek Japan, etc. and was exhibited in St.Petersburg, Vienna, Moscow, Bratislava, among others. Max was nominated for KLM Paul Huf Awards in 2008. He is currently based in Moscow.

Happy Birthday, Muhammad Ali: 70 Iconic Images for 70 Years

Muhammad Ali’s first sounds were “Gee-Gee, Gee-Gee.” His beautiful mother Odessa Clay called her son “G-G” for the rest of her life, and years later, Ali would say, “After I won the Golden Gloves, I told Mama that from the very beginning, I was trying to say, ‘Golden Gloves.’ ” So began the life of Muhammad Ali, who celebrates his 70th birthday today.

Though many know him as the greatest boxer of all time, few know that it was actually the theft of his bicycle at age 12 that began his boxing career. After the bike was stolen, Ali ran to the police station, threatening to “whup whoever stole my bike.” Joe Martin, a white Louisville, Ky., policeman, told him he had better learn to fight, and in his spare time, he took Ali under his wing and taught him the ropes. Ali won his first fight six weeks later. When the referee raised his arm in victory, Ali shouted the iconic words that would become a self-fulfilling prophecy: “I’m gonna be the greatest of all time!”

But what was so incredible about Ali was all the courageous and selfless things he did beyond boxing. In 1975 I called Ali to talk to him about the campaign I was doing for Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, whose book convinced me that he was an innocent man in the slammer. Muhammad was so happy to hear I thought Rubin was innocent. He said, “Absolutely, I’m with you.” Ali literally stopped doing a million things to help someone — a fellow fighter — get out of jail. It was so heroic, and of all the times we worked together, it is still my favorite memory of him. I also can’t tell you how many times, when we were driving on the road, he’d see a school and make me pull over. He’d meet all 200 schoolkids and sign 200 autographs, often with a kid on his lap. That was just his personality, to be so giving of his time. It seriously got to the point that when I saw a school, I’d think, “Oh my God, here we go again. We’re in trouble.”

About 15 years ago, I was a juror in court in downtown Manhattan. After the case was over, the judge asked the jury to enter and talk to him. We go in, and he explains that one of the jurors was a man who changed his life. We’re looking at each other, and he goes, “The juror is George Lois.” Everyone is looking at me, and I’m looking at him like he’s crazy. He told me he was a student at Columbia University in the ’60s, when there were furious debates about Vietnam and draft dodgers, and how that 1968 Esquire cover of Ali as St. Sebastian solidified the argument for Ali’s decision to not participate in the draft. The judge said it changed Columbia University students’ understanding and point of view about the war. I remember that because it speaks to the influence of Ali. From a narcissistic self-promoter who eventually became a man of enduring spirituality through a journey of formidable tests, Ali emerged as a true superhero in the annals of American history and a worldwide ambassador of courage and conviction. A boxing legend who courageously spoke up for black men and civil rights throughout his life! Ali, above all, is the sweetest, nicest person I’ve ever met in my life. And on his glorious 70th birthday, I am privileged to salute him, with the rest of the world.

George Lois is one of advertising’s most famous art directors and cultural provocateurs. From 1962 to ’72, he art-directed several iconic covers for Esquire magazine. 

William Mebane

The name William Mebane first came into focus for me when I submitted work to Love-Pictures. I wanted to see who was behind the curtain at Love-Pictures (co-curated with Scott Tolmie) and discovered Will’s terrific work. He works as a solo and a collaborative photographer, often with Martin Hyers, as he did with the body of work featured below.

Will lives in New York with his wife and two children after having received his MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute in 2002. He was awarded a J. William Fulbright Fellowship to photograph in Nepal in 2002 and 2003 and was recognized as a PDN 30 Emerging Photographer in 2005. He now shoots editorially for The New York Times Magazine, Esquire, and New York Magazine, but also exhibits fine art in New York and Europe.

Will has numerous interesting bodies of work looking at our culture from a quirky and interesting perspective. The featured project, Fashion-t.v.b.t.s., was commissioned by Tim Barber from tinyvices for the Milk Made blog. Hyers + Mebane were asked to cover all the happenings during NY fashion week in 2011.

Images by Hyers + Mebane, from Fashion – t.v.b.t.s.


Tim Barber invited us and several other photographers to photograph behind the scenes for the MAC / MILK downtown fashion shows during fashion week of Spring 2011.

We don’t know much about fashion, so it was one of those rare, wonderful occasions where you know you’ve entered into a highly organized subculture but thankfully you don’t know the rules and the protocols.

Sometimes it’s easiest to photograph what’s closest to you and that which you know most intimately. But it’s also refreshing to be in unfamiliar places. It makes it easier, to quote Hank Wessel, “to let your eyes get ahead of your brain.”