Tag Archives: Ernesto Bazan

Aperture, Chris Boot @ LOOK3 Festival

According to Time Magazine’s LightBox, “The very day after the 2011 LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph ended, this year’s guest curators—National Geographic photographer Vincent Musi and Washington Post visuals editor David Griffin—started to put together the slate of artists who will appear [for the 2012 iteration.]” This weekend, the visions of Musi and Griffin come to fruition as Charlottesville, Virginia plays host to LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph 2012.

LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph returns June 7 through 9. Pinned as a “celebration of photography, created by photographers, for those who share a passion for the still image,” LOOK3 is sponsored by BD, National Geographic magazine, and Canon USA, and hosted this year along Charlottesville, VA’s Downtown Mall. The Festival features exhibits and on-stage appearances of three “INsight” photographers, as well as exhibitions, outdoor projections, workshops and interviews over three days and nights.

INsight artists Alex Webb, Donna Ferrato, and Stanley Greene will be featured in 2012, three artists who have met the standards of having produced a significant body of work, and who are understood to possess the capacity to inspire others in the field. The weekend’s masters talks will be given by Ernesto Bazan, Hank Willis Thomas, Lynsey Addario, Bruce Gilden, Robin Schwartz and Camille Seaman, as well as Aperture Foundation’s Executive Director Chris Boot, whose more than 25 years in photography has yielded countless books commissioned, edited or published since 1984.

Aperture will be further present, assembling a special exhibition, Aperture at Sixty Library, which will showcase highlights from Aperture’s many years of publishing—first through the eponymous magazine then, starting in the 1960s, through books—that will reflect on one of the most comprehensive and influential libraries in the history of photography.

LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph
June 7 through 9, 2012
Downtown mall and other venues
Charlottesville, Virginia

Chris Boot MASTERS TALK
June 8, 2012, 11am
The Paramount Theater

Aperture at Sixty Library
June 7 through 17, 2012
200 Water St

———

›› La Lettre de La Photographie profiles exhibitions at the festival by Hank Willis Thomas, Alex WebbBruce GildenStanley Greene, and many more. NYTimes‘ LENS blog takes a closer look at Thomas’ workLA Times‘ Framework interviews Mitch Dobrowner, whose work is also featured at Look3, and Time‘s LightBox speaks with guest curators Vincent Musi and David Griffin.

Curators Look Ahead to LOOK3

The very day after the 2011 LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph ended, this year’s guest curators—National Geographic photographer Vincent Musi and Washington Post visuals editor David Griffin—started to put together the slate of artists who will appear this coming weekend. The annual for-photographers-by-photographers event in Charlottesville, Va. runs June 7-9. But, says Musi, the weekend will include the work of more than one year: professional relationships and the curators’ senses of balance, both developed over many years, were key in the decision process.

The three artists chosen by Musi and Griffin to be this year’s INSight Artists—the featured photographers who, Griffin says, must be people who have made a significant body of work and can inspire other photographers—are Stanley Greene, Donna Ferrato and Alex Webb. Masters talks will be given by Ernesto Bazan, Hank Willis Thomas, Lynsey Addario, Bruce Gilden, Robin Schwartz and Camille Seaman; David Doubilet is this year’s TREES Artist, whose work will be hung in trees along Charlottesville’s downtown pedestrian mall.

Although the festival does not have an explicit theme, Musi says that a documentary slant is strong in all of the featured work. “We also have this crossover because advertising and the fine-art world are really stepping up and doing a lot of what journalism used to do,” he says. And it goes both ways: he cites Hank Willis Thomas as someone who is using journalistic forms outside of the world of journalism. “The common thread,” Musi says. “is that everyone is very excited to have a foot in each world, but the work is very documentary in nature.”

Griffin echoes that sentiment, citing the aesthetic vision evident in Alex Webb’s work as an example of great journalism that “hits that beautiful spot” that touches the art world. He says that this year’s LOOK3 will place a heavier emphasis on individual shows for the speakers’ work, so that guests who attend the talks will be able to see the pictures discussed. There will be more than a dozen hours of onstage programming and a dozen print shows hung, which is more than in previous years.

Both curators agree, though, that the artists who present are not necessarily the highlights of the festival. “This is building a community and sustaining it, so that people go from one side of the stage to the other and back again,” says Musi. That community is made up of artists who attend as viewers, give talks a later year and then maybe teach a workshop some other time.

And artists who just hang out: “There’s a coffee house and it’s right outside of one of the hotels, and I just remember walking out each morning and David Alan Harvey would always be sitting out there having a cup of coffee,” Griffin says of past festivals, “and there’d be Martin Parr sitting with him or Jim Nachtwey, and you’d just walk up and sit down and start talking with a person. That’s one of the really cool things about the festival.”

More information about this year’s LOOK3 Festival of the Photograph, which will take place in Charlottesville, Va., from June 7-9, is available here.

Camaraderie in Cuba: Ernesto Bazan’s Self-Publishing Philosophy

For every boon that Ernesto Bazan has received, he can point to a parallel moment where he gave to someone else. “I strongly believe that in life, the more you give, the more you get back,” the Sicilian-born photographer said. “There’s no doubt that that’s the way it should be.”

This philosophy was something that Bazan saw again and again during his 14 years living in Cuba, especially in the five years he spent shooting rural life. He found that instead of the conflict-ridden urban place he often saw portrayed, the Cuba he lived in was one with a strong sense of community and charity. “There is a lot of daily life taking place on the streets,” he said. “Neighbors talk to one another if they need a favor, if they need some matches or garlic and the exchange of several things.” The Cubans Bazan encountered may not have had much, but what they did have, they shared. The camaraderie was so strong, so palpable, that Bazan was reminded of his own early, cozy childhood in Palermo. That spirit of reciprocity also crept into his work.

The dreamy, hazy images that fill the pages of Bazan’s latest book, called Al Campo, portray hard-working farmers, boisterous children and modest but colorful homes. The scenes reveal poverty, yes, but more noticeably they reveal resonating warmth. Farmers with wiry frames band together to work the land; small children dressed in little to no clothing lend one another a hand.

And more than just permeating the content of the pages, Bazan’s philosophy helped him actually publish the work. Both Al Campo and Bazan’s previous photography book, entitled Cuba, were self-published, a feat which would have been impossible without help from the photographer’s beloved students. While in Cuba, Bazan had spent several years teaching in-depth photography workshops, around 10 or 11 a year, and consequently became very close to many of his students. In 2006, calamity struck when the Cuban government cracked down on the photographer’s practice of teaching, and he was forced to leave the country. It was then that he realized, after giving so much to his students, that he would need help from them.

Courtesy of Ernesto Bazan

Ernesto Bazan editing at the computer during a workshop in Sicily last year.

He wrote to them, requesting help with the editing, production and funding that would be required to turn his photographs into two self-published works. Though he said he had no idea what kind of response he would receive, more than 50 of his students joined together, each contributing their talent and money, to help make the photographer’s dream a reality.

Bazan may have devoted his time and energy to educating his students—not to mention sacrificing his Cuban home because he refused to quit teaching—yet he feels that all his effort has come back full circle. “It was a great privilege for me because I think I’m the only one with this incredible student support,” he said. “Basically, I feel that, thanks to giving all of myself, I’ve been getting so much back.”

Ernesto Bazan is a Mexico-based photographer. Al Campo was published in 2011.

Megan Gibson is a Writer-Reporter at the London bureau of TIME. Find her on Twitter at @MeganJGibson

Camaraderie in Cuba: Ernesto Bazan’s Self-Publishing Philosophy

For every boon that Ernesto Bazan has received, he can point to a parallel moment where he gave to someone else. “I strongly believe that in life, the more you give, the more you get back,” the Sicilian-born photographer said. “There’s no doubt that that’s the way it should be.”

This philosophy was something that Bazan saw again and again during his 14 years living in Cuba, especially in the five years he spent shooting rural life. He found that instead of the conflict-ridden urban place he often saw portrayed, the Cuba he lived in was one with a strong sense of community and charity. “There is a lot of daily life taking place on the streets,” he said. “Neighbors talk to one another if they need a favor, if they need some matches or garlic and the exchange of several things.” The Cubans Bazan encountered may not have had much, but what they did have, they shared. The camaraderie was so strong, so palpable, that Bazan was reminded of his own early, cozy childhood in Palermo. That spirit of reciprocity also crept into his work.

The dreamy, hazy images that fill the pages of Bazan’s latest book, called Al Campo, portray hard-working farmers, boisterous children and modest but colorful homes. The scenes reveal poverty, yes, but more noticeably they reveal resonating warmth. Farmers with wiry frames band together to work the land; small children dressed in little to no clothing lend one another a hand.

And more than just permeating the content of the pages, Bazan’s philosophy helped him actually publish the work. Both Al Campo and Bazan’s previous photography book, entitled Cuba, were self-published, a feat which would have been impossible without help from the photographer’s beloved students. While in Cuba, Bazan had spent several years teaching in-depth photography workshops, around 10 or 11 a year, and consequently became very close to many of his students. In 2006, calamity struck when the Cuban government cracked down on the photographer’s practice of teaching, and he was forced to leave the country. It was then that he realized, after giving so much to his students, that he would need help from them.

Courtesy of Ernesto Bazan

Ernesto Bazan editing at the computer during a workshop in Sicily last year.

He wrote to them, requesting help with the editing, production and funding that would be required to turn his photographs into two self-published works. Though he said he had no idea what kind of response he would receive, more than 50 of his students joined together, each contributing their talent and money, to help make the photographer’s dream a reality.

Bazan may have devoted his time and energy to educating his students—not to mention sacrificing his Cuban home because he refused to quit teaching—yet he feels that all his effort has come back full circle. “It was a great privilege for me because I think I’m the only one with this incredible student support,” he said. “Basically, I feel that, thanks to giving all of myself, I’ve been getting so much back.”

Ernesto Bazan is a Mexico-based photographer. Al Campo was published in 2011 and you can see more work here.

Megan Gibson is a Writer-Reporter at the London bureau of TIME. Find her on Twitter at @MeganJGibson

Sunday 12 June 2011

New edition of Photojournalism Links comes from Cafe de Prague in Hamra, Beirut. Finding good internet connection here has proven rather difficult as it did back in 2008 when I was in Lebanon the last time….de Prague definitely has the best wireless yet (thanks to @anastasiatl for the tip!)… Been working on a NGO commission everyday this week, but having a day off, so I came here for Sunday brunch, Skype calls to friends and family, and of course to do the weekly blog updates….

Here we go…

Features and Essays 

A-Must-See…

Erin Trieb: Home From Afghanistan to New Battles (NYT Lens: June 2011) Trieb’s website

Lynsey Addario: Five-Star Delhi (VII Network: June 2011)

Sebastiao Salgado: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (NYT Magazine: June 2011) Interview 

Stephanie Sinclair’s NGM June 2011 Child Brides work featured on NPR Picture show with an interview….

Stephanie Sinclair: The Secret World of Child Brides (NPR: June 2011)

Ziyah Gafic: Iranian Students (Newsweek: June 2011)

Simon Roberts: Piers of the Realm (Telegraph tear sheet on DMB Media: June 2011)

Bill Hess: A Warm Feeling for the Arctic (NYT Lens: June 2011)

Ernesto Bazan: Another Cuba (NYT Lens: June 2011)

Georger Steinmetz: African Air (MediaStorm: June 2011)

Rodrigo Abd: Anti-Gaddafi Rebels in Libya (TIME: June 2011)

Tomas van Houtryve: A ‘Real’ Statue of Liberty (NYT: June 2011)

Richard Koci Hernandez: Instragram (NYT Lens: June 2011)

Joachim Ladefoged: Let the Graduations Commence (TIME LB: June 2011)

Time Lightbox: Fotokonbit: Putting Cameras in Haitian Hands (TIME LB: June 2011)

Sven Torfinn: Living with HIV in Kenya’s Kibera slum (BBC: June 2011)

Not conceptual…oh yeah…not at all…

Paul Graham: Films (TIME LB: June 2011)

We’ve seen this plenty of times before, but always worth another look…

Christopher Anderson: Capitolio (Burn: June 2011)

Interviews

Christopher Anderson (PDN: June 2011)

Sebastian Junger (LA Times: June 2011)

Massimo Vitali (WTJ: June 2011)

Olivia Arthur (E-photoreview: June 2011)

Paul Trevor (Guardian: June 2011)

Articles 

BJP: VII to close Network (BJP: June 2011)

Verve Photo: Sanjit Das (Verve: June 2011)

TIME LB: Look 3 Festival (TIME LB: June 2011)

Guardian: Philip Lorca DiCorcia’s Best Shot (Guardian: June 2011)

Bremser Tumblr: How to Photograph the Entire World: The Google Street View Era (Bremser.tumblr: June 2011)

Vincent Laforet: What camera did I use to make this still picture? (Photographer’s blog: June 2011) Via @MattDunham

Source Magazine Graduate Photography Online 2011 (Source: June 2011)

David Campbell: The new media landscape (3): community, transactions and value (DC blog: June 2011)

Alex Varley-Winter: The Unpaid Intership Boom (Frontline Club blog: June 2011)

Awards, Competitions, and Grants

Ian Parry Scholarship : Deadline 30 June |Related from BJP

International Photography Awards : Deadline June 24

Student Photographer of the Year category in the Guardian Student Media Award 

Irina Werning won BURN’s Emerging Photographer Grant…Surprising choice I think..not because Werning’s series is not nice – it is – but I think it’s the type of work that has a lot of editorial opportunities (It has already been published in Sunday Times Mag for instance) and as such don’t necessarily need support…also the series seems pretty much finished…and the grant is for continuing work…

Burn: Emerging Photographer Fund – 2011 Recipient (Burn: June 2011)

Luceo Images Student Project Award Winner is Maddie McGarvey 

BOP NPPA Still Photography winners (NPPA: June 2011) Related from NYT Lens

AgenciesMetrography : Metrography is the first and only Iraqi photography agency covering all 18 of Iraq’s governorates from Al-Basra to Zakho

Agencies / Photographers -VII Mentor program has a new member Chin Chi Yim 

PhotographersAndre Liohn

Quote of the week….“When photographers get together, they talk about equipment. When artists get together, they talk about ideas.” – Chris Steele Perkins

To finish with…Arty Bollocks Generator