Tag Archives: Emotions

Sylvain Granjon

Sylvain Granjon has just opened an exhibition at Galeria Tagomago that will travel to both gallery locations in Barcelona and Paris. The exhibit runs throught October 20th in Barcelona and moves to Paris from November 15th-18th.

Sylvain is a French artist who comes from the world of the circus and entertainment. After more than 20 years performing across the world in a number of street theater festivals, Sylvain now creates his magic with a camera, specializing in portraits and constructed realities. I am featuring a series of his daughter, Douce Amère, that is simply charming in it’s exploration of portraiture, humor, and appreciation for childish things.

DOUCE AMÈRE

I come from the entertainment world. I have been an entertainer for 20 years. I would say I’m an eccentric more than a clown.

This artificial world has been mine for all that time.
When I photograph my daughter, I photograph myself.
Her direct look has shaken my adult certainties. What I see in her eyes challenges me, as a grown child, as a father…
She seems to be asking me : “What have you become?”
When I portray my daughter there is a seriousness at odds 
with her young age.
I try to evoke the adult’s desperate quest for the mythical image of his own childhood; the source of all our emotions.
Sylvain Granjon, 2012

Alessandra Tecla Gerevini

Some photographers create ways of making work outside of the typical arenas, ways of keeping them motivated and stimulated.  Milanese photographer Alessandra Tecla Gerevini has created a lovely project titled 365 Mattine (mornings), simply taking a look at where life starts for her at the beginning of each day, and the result is a wonderful visual diary.

Even if I’m a photographer, I spend a lot of time thinking what to shoot, why, to say what, to show who.



One
year ago I’ve decided to DO something lasting and continuous, something
to think about everyday, even when I wasn’t in the mood for taking
pictures. 

I decided to shoot in the morning because I think it’s the best part of the day, when you wake up, the light is amazing, it plays with shadows creating new landscapes, and you have all the day ahead:
it’s the time of good projects, positive thoughts, smiles and changing.
I love mornings.

This year is gone now, my project (called “365 mattine” that means “365 mornings”, even if there were 366 days this year, so I’ve taken a “hidden track picture” for the 2nd of August) is finished. I‘ve pointed my camera at the little things of everyday life, my loved ones, myself, my inner self, trying to create a map of my emotions, trying to show them and make them universal. Sometimes just trying to be at home.

It has been tough, every time it has been introspective, a way to remember  a whole year of events and feelings and places and friends. Unfortunately also moments I’d like to forget. But that’s it, that’s the meaning and the purpose.

Photographer #444: Laurence Demaison

Laurence Demaison, 1965, France, studied at the School of Architecture of Strasbourg before she started making self-portraits in 1993. Her vast body of work is almost exclusively constituted of photographs of herself. She does not digitally manipulate the images nor does she manipulate the photographs after they have been shot with the exception of chemical inversion for some series. All the techniques she uses are analog and done by herself. The various series have a large array of emotions. They can be poetic, fragile and classical, yet sometimes they are quirky, haunting or even freaky. She is a photographer who seeks the bounderies of what can be done within analog photography and successfully crosses them with grace. Laurence has exhibited her work on numerous occasions, mainly in Western Europe and New York. The photographs have also been released in several monographs. The following images come from the series La Chambre Noire, La Poseuse and Les Bulles.

Website: www.laurencedemaison.com

Return to Libya: Reflections on a Photographer’s Personal Conflict

Libya didn’t simply fall at the end; it rather slid from the hands that had gripped onto it for far too long. It was taken back and returned to its rightful owners.

In the six months before my second return to Libya this September, after the fall of Tripoli, I had seen the way things would finally end through a romantic kaleidoscope. I wanted to celebrate in the square after finding my family in the crowd. I wanted to be my father’s son. I wanted that gap I have felt from Libya my entire life to at once close. With this uprooting of the regime in Libya, I felt whatever huge hole was left was now filled with a complex melody of emotions. I had not expected anything short of jubilation, and never had the impulse of reflection been a part of this plan for me. Before I had a chance to acknowledge the transition, it was already complete and it gave way to an incredible sense of pride. The rebels had brought the regime to the ledge, but it was the people who would be the final push.

At the time, the city celebrated but the country seemed exhausted. I had been afraid of the capital spiraling into chaos following the fall, but instead everything seemed to have taken its place. People went to work and took up positions to help attend to the city’s wounds—as if all Libyans had been rehearsing for this moment their entire lives. People grasped their roles at this moment and took hold of the importance of civility. During a visit to a hospital one day, a man explained to me simply, “We all have our jobs now. As a Libyan, you have your job here, and it is important. You do your job and I’ll do mine.”

I felt as though I needed that clear point of departure to help finally tether together these loose ends I had felt my entire life. In the end, all those emotions I had reserved for that anticipated moment were nowhere to be found. A kind of paralysis took hold instead. The previous expectations would pale in comparison to how this unexpected state would leave me. Joy was replaced with anger and clarity with haze. What became clear was that this hadn’t been my war as much as it had been for the rest of Libya.

To me, the regime was like an ominous vapor. While their fighters were not visible on the streets any longer, evidence of their lethal effect was very present, and as they fled, they left in their tracks a deep gash in the country and its people.

The personal conflict I felt during this time brought me to a point where my relation to breaking news played less an immediate role in my work than trying to restore my connection during a period when so much was unclear and surreal. Memories near and far rushed forward and I felt I needed to step back before the whole thing engulfed me. I had a clear reason for being there. More than one, in fact, and I wanted to get a hold of whatever I was experiencing and work towards a clearer picture. That image only became focused once I paused and allowed that nostalgia to catch up with me. It was an unconscious choice to proceed forward only when something made sense to me and I felt it somehow fit into this puzzle I was building. I realized that a middle distance was missing. The gap between me and what I was here to see was gone and I felt pushed up against this giant shift. I was able to see everything clearly. I needed that minor space to objectify this moment just enough to try and grasp it but I was immediately enveloped instead. As if all the oxygen in that needed breathing room was extinguished and a vacuum pulled everything from inside of me.

Much of what I became transfixed with might otherwise have seemed banal to some though it had a relevant place in processing this event. Whether it was the discarded green flags of the regime being slowly devoured by the elements, or the simplest gesture that suggested a great relief within this new absence in the country.

While the experience of this past return lent little to fully realizing how I had expected things to play out, everything in fact eventually did play out. The insignificance of those dreams had never been so clear once seeing and feeling the collective sigh of relief the country let out.

Jehad Nga is a Libyan photographer who lives in New York. See more of his work here.

To read Nga’s piece about his father’s life in 1960′s Libya, before the Gaddafi regime, click here

Photographer #379: Zhang Xiao

Zhang Xiao, 1981, China, studied Architecture at Yantai University. Between 2005 and 2009 he worked for the Chongqing Morning Post and has since been active as a freelance photographer. His project Coastline focuses, as the title describes, on the Chinese coastline which is 18000 kilometres long. For Xiao the sea is a place of strong emotions and rich imagery. He states that “the sea is the beginning of lives and dreams.” The project also clearly shows how China is changing and has been changing in the last 30 years since it began opening up. This change is also visible in his project They. The project documents the Chinese culture while undergoing a societal change. It shows culture and tradition, but also the youth and their newly acquired culture. Amongst his other projects we find a series called Three Gorges. The Three Gorges Dam was completed in 2006 and presents many economic benifits, however, as the images of Zhang show us, it has also led to a vast amount of deconstruction and demolition. Zhang has exhibited his work in China, Japan, Germany, England and France. The following images come from the series Coastline, They and Three Gorges.


Website: www.zhangxiaophoto.com

Photographer #379: Zhang Xiao

Zhang Xiao, 1981, China, studied Architecture at Yantai University. Between 2005 and 2009 he worked for the Chongqing Morning Post and has since been active as a freelance photographer. His project Coastline focuses, as the title describes, on the Chinese coastline which is 18000 kilometres long. For Xiao the sea is a place of strong emotions and rich imagery. He states that “the sea is the beginning of lives and dreams.” The project also clearly shows how China is changing and has been changing in the last 30 years since it began opening up. This change is also visible in his project They. The project documents the Chinese culture while undergoing a societal change. It shows culture and tradition, but also the youth and their newly acquired culture. Amongst his other projects we find a series called Three Gorges. The Three Gorges Dam was completed in 2006 and presents many economic benifits, however, as the images of Zhang show us, it has also led to a vast amount of deconstruction and demolition. Zhang has exhibited his work in China, Japan, Germany, England and France. The following images come from the series Coastline, They and Three Gorges.


Website: www.zhangxiaophoto.com

Photographer #295: Dimitris Triantafyllou

Dimitris Triantafyllou, 1967, Greece, studied physics and mathematics and even received an MA in Biophysics. He also studied photography at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. He works as a freelance photographer and teaches photography at various locations in his hometown in Greece. His photography is dark, gritty and very personal. It focuses on themes of identity, perception and memory. In his series Human Face, Heart of an Animal he questions himself how we look at other human beings and ourselves. By recording the events with his camera he started to create his own world, a world of expression that gave him a chance to comprehend himself. Thru the Looking Glass is a series that questions reality and fantasy. If reality is guided by emotions, memories, thoughts and dreams, maybe reality is fiction itself. He focused on people he knew including their dreams, their worlds and their realities. The following images come from the series Diaries of Ghosts, Thru the Looking Glass and Human Face, Heart of an Animal.


Website: www.dimitristriantafyllou.com