Tag Archives: Emerging Photography

A Photo Student Update

Shsssssshhhhh aphotostudent.com is sleeping.

But you can find me at The New Yorker’s Photo Booth or hanging out at http://jamespomerantz.tumblr.com

 

 

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Photography Open Salon Arles: An Eye for An Ear

Recently, Les Recontres d’Arles celebrated photographers and photography from around the world with a two week festival in the south of France.  One of the biggest draws was Photography Open Salon’s An Eye For An Ear, curated by Vanja Karas.  Set in the Galerie Huit, this exhibition continues until September 23rd, with an estimated viewership of close to 100,000. Many thanks to Eran Gilat for his assistance with this post.

 An Eye for an Ear, curated by Vanja Karas

Photography
Open Salon is designed to showcase cutting-edge contemporary and
emerging photography from around the world and enable talented artists
to exhibit and have exposure during and alongside one of the oldest and
most renowned International photography festivals: Les Rencontres
d’Arles, which has been running for 43 years. 


Photography Open Salon Arles 2012 showcases a selection of 250
images by over 100 photographers from 34 countries. A selection of this
year’s winning images will also be showcased in South-East Asia in early
2013. The work was selected from a wide range of responses and
interpretations  submitted by artists from 83 countries. 
   


Selected images from An Eye for An Ear
Anne-Marie Atkinson
 Eran Gilat

 Amro Hamzawi

 Young-Hee Kim

 Sara Naim
 Alex and Felix

 Jocelyn Allen

 Aline Smithson

 Tariq Dajani

 Emer Gillespie
 Edward Hopley

 Jane Koh

 Julia Lindemalm

 Ellen Nolan

 Maria Paschalidou
 Barbra Riley
 Laura Stevens

Pina Bausch, Kontakthof, POSTHUMOUS  by Vanja Karas

This
body of work explores the neo-expressoinist non-verbal narrative of
movement and dance. These images are part of a series taken during the
performance created by the legendary German choreographer Pina Bausch
performed by her theatre group Tanztheater Wuppertal,  after her death,
at the Barbican Theatre in London. Pina’s striking theatricality
included sado-masochism, intentionally bad ballet, lots of evening
gowns, high heels, lipstick-adorned women and barefoot men in suits. The
series, however, is not only about the aesthetics of Pina Bausch’s
neo-expressionist choreography and movement:  it also explores the
comfort and discomfort of solitude and the interplay between the
voluntary and involuntary basis on which we collect, cultivate, recall
and process our memories. Dealing with the historical narrative through
symbolism, allegory and myth, the dramatic physical idiosyncrasy is
created by the performers, all over 65, chosen from the generation that
carries pre-Berlin Wall memories and experiences. Some live and long for
the past, some escape into their fantasies, others don’t want to
remember…  
Vanja Karas © Pina Bausch 

Vanja Karas © Pina Bausch 

Plastic Spoon – Yoshi Kametani. Photos, Book Dummy, Film…Enjoy

Plastic Spoon

By Yoshi Kametani

Born in New York in 1980, Yoshi Kametani went to Edinburgh to visit a girl he met while traveling in Asia. He applied to and was accepted at a Scottish university. Over the following four years, Yoshi photographed and filmed in one of the most deprived council housing communities in the UK where Trainspotting author Irvine Welsh spent his formative years.

Unlike many photos depicting “socially alienated groups of people,” Yoshi’s work is in no way condescending – his subjects were clearly also his friends and welcoming of his presence. Yoshi was kind enough to share his book dummy, a clip from his film and some insightful words.

Thanks Yoshi!

Yoshi Kametani from the project "Plastic Spoon"
Yoshi Kametani from the project "Plastic Spoon"


Plastic Spoon has evolved from 4 years of interacting and building relationships with the residents of Muirhouse, one of the most deprived council schemes in the UK. The scheme, which is located on the outskirts of a city that – conversely – has the most millionaires per capita in the country, is known for its high unemployment rates and issues with drugs and violence.

This project intertwines through an array of individuals, landscapes, objects, and domestic settings that communicate the feeling of isolation, alienation, and the eccentricity that is specific to Muirhouse. This landscape provided me with a boundary where I could freely explore my curiosity. Spending a substantial amount of time with my subjects has inevitably affected the photographs, which have placed the representation of my relationship with the subjects at the focus of the composition.

 

Mikey dyes his prize pigeons feather with yellow hair dye because he thinks it looks beautiful. Yoshi Kametani from the project "Plastic Spoon"

 

The influence for Plastic Spoon came from a novel I read before moving from New York City to Edinburgh, Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh. I was fascinated by the stories in the book, which made me want to see the type of environment that had cultivated these tales in Welshe’s imagination. I found out that Welsh was raised in Muirhouse and some of the stories were set in this scheme.

 

Playground. Yoshi Kametani from the project "Plastic Spoon"

 

The title Plastic Spoon has multiple layers of meaning. The name came about one night when I was eating dinner with one of my friends from Muirhouse. I was watching my friend’s son eating his fried rice across from me. He was eating with a plastic spoon. I noticed that the majority of the time I ate with my friends from Muirhouse, we would be eating take out that came with plastic cutlery. Another layer that the plastic spoon signifies is the heroin culture. The most commonly used cutlery to prepare heroin is a spoon. And lastly to me the plastic spoon represents the working class. The way I see it, is that the plastic spoon is the opposite of the silver spoon, which represents the upper class. There is a saying “you are born with a silver spoon in your mouth” which means, you are born into a rich family.

 

Plant traded for 125cc dirt bike. Yoshi Kametani from the project "Plastic Spoon"

 

Even though my intention and what I’m trying to communicate is not directly political, it would be silly of me to say that the work is not political. I believe that politics and photography go hand in hand and it’s very difficult to separate the two when you work with reality as your subject matter. In the project the images dealt with a few aspects of society that surrounded my subjects such as crime, drug abuse, poverty, class, discrimination, masculinity and education. Working in an environment immersed in these issues it is near impossible to avoid them, thus making the work political.

 

Someone's security system. Yoshi Kametani from the project "Plastic Spoon"

 

The obvious and most apparent characteristic of the subject matter in “Plastic Spoon” is not original in any way. The documentation of the working class, the poor, the socially alienated groups of people follows in the tradition of photographers such as Jacob Riis, Lewis Hine and the Farm Security Administration (FSA) photographers.

Although the project may initially look like a social documentary, the point of the project is not only the social situation of the people in the photographs. The conceptual approach and intention for ”Plastic Spoon” harnesses the ideology found in the work of Robert Frank and Lee Friedlander who used a subjective approach that was based on personal experience. The “Plastic Spoon” project is as much about my relationship to the selected group of people who reside in Muirhouse as it is about their individual lives. I was not capable of being a passive observer. I spent a lot of time down in Muirhoue, which inevitably cultivated friendships between the subjects and myself.

 

 

I will give you a few examples of the strengths and the weaknesses of both mediums to explain the decision to incorporate both the film documentary and the book in the “Plastic Spoon” project.

What video supplies us with is information, which shows things happening in real time. We hear sound and see movement experienced in time. Video technology allows you to speed up, slow down and play in reveres your footage. It can even freeze the footage to mimic some of the characteristics of a photograph. As a tool for collecting visual and audio information, the video camera is a far more advanced and efficient tool than a photographic camera.

I believe that one of the main strengths in photography lays in the silence and stillness of the photograph. The stillness of a photograph automatically gives the image a surreal quality. You can study and scrutinize that split second for as long or as short as you would like. This time gives you a space to think about the subject in the photograph. With film (in the traditional way of watching a film) you are at the mercy of the time line. You are given information rapidly one after the other, which leads you to analyze in hindsight the film you are watching.

Another difference that could be seen as a strength is in the process of making the photograph. The experience of making photographs, being the subject of photographs and viewing photographs differs completely from the experience working with video. Depending on which medium you decide to use will determine the relationship and the type of information that would be exchanged between you and the subject. For instance generally when I am collecting information with video I am talking to the subject through the camera, which could make the situations feels more awkward and tense. But when I am photographing I can create more of a comfortable environment in which a natural interaction can take place.

There are obvious similarities in both medium such as lighting, composition, and so on. But I look at the differences in order to utilize the strengths of each medium and try to compensate for each medium’s weakness. The reason for using both mediums is so that the viewers will get a better understanding of the project when they experience the book and the video opposed to just one or the other.

 

 

The approach to my work at the moment is based around the techniques and theories implemented by visual anthropologists. The information I gather comes in the form of video, audio recordings, photographs, writings and artifacts. I believe that the more types of visual information I have to learn form and organize the better I will be able to communicate my experience.

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Photo Series: Andrew Fuller – Beach Volleyball

Here it is! The first post from my call for photo submissions.

Andrew Fuller is a California-based beach volleyball player. Andrew is also currently pursuing an MFA in Photography at Academy of Art University in San Francisco.

According to his bio, Andrew is left-handed and great at pan frying vegetables and meats. Sadly, he’s no good at being small (hiding) or staying up past 11pm.

Andrew’s bio fails to mention that he makes some pretty damn good photographs too.

I’ve never cared about beach volleyball. Everything I know about beach volleyball comes from California Dreaming, Top Gun and Side Out.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Andrew’s photographs make me care. They show me beach volleyball in a way I had never considered it before: a sweat-stained hat, feet mangled from years in the sun and sand, a tangled net. The normal representation of beach volleyball as all bubble gum and smiles is replaced by a melancholic depiction of the oft-painful and monotonous commitment needed to compete professionally. Andrew is clearly a part of the beach volleyball world and he does a great job of sharing that world with the rest of us.

I hope you enjoy Andrew’s work as much as I do.

Head over to Andrew Fuller’s Website to see more photographs

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Photo news – Tri-pod vs Contact Editions at StudioStrike photo print sale and slide slam

This Saturday photography collective Contact Editions has teamed up with Tri-pod for the 1st birthday celebrations of the new creative hub studioSTRIKE.

As the South London art scene continues to grow, studioSTRIKE will be hosting this free event, which is a bit more than the normal Contact Editions sideshow.

For a summer special, Contact Editions will be presenting a day-long feast of photography and fine art with print sales, projections, artist Q+As, accompanied by studioSTRIKE’s open studios, BBQ and live Brazilian bands.

VS evenings feature opposing photographic projections selected by Contact and a guest, on Saturday it will be slide slamming with the Tri-pod group who I have been working with and it promises to be a fun evening.

I will be attending and will host the battles and Q&A with represented artists. Please RSVP to [email protected] if you wish to attend the event so numbers can be gauged.

To fins out more and see who is participating, see over for the full programme running from 3pm till late…

3pm onwards: Open studios, with affordable photography print sales from Contact Editions and Tri-pod.

5pm: Curated film screening by The Kitchen Sink Collective

6pm: BBQ in the garden

7pm: Photo VS and artists in conversation, led by me, featuring Melanie Stidolph, Natasha Caruana, David Axelbank and Mona Simon.
10pm: Live bands

The curated projections by Contact and Tri-pod, will show contemporary photography projects featuring the work of:

Contact Editions
Antonia Zennaro
Ben Roberts
Chloe Dewe Mathews
Mona Simon
David Axelbank
Seba Kurtis
Hin Chua
Tereza Zelenkova

Tri-pod
Natasha Caruana
Zoe Childerly
Ellie Davies
Karen Grainger
Dean Hollowood
Judith Lyons
Wendy Pye
Melanie Stidolph

Contact Editions aims to support and promote contemporary photography by showcasing new work in fresh and interesting ways.

Entry is always free and usually with a discounted bar so that photographers and photography lovers can spend a whole evening discovering exciting new work in an informal setting.

As well as events, Contact is an online gallery selling affordable edition prints of emerging artists’ work. We aim to show new photography from both emerging and more established artists, both in the online gallery, on our blog and through events.

Tri-pod is developing a creative model for the realisation of photographic and lens-based projects and exploring ways of working using an informal group structure. Its first initiative was set up to support emerging and established artists and photographers create a personal project in the context of a closed research and development group. Established in April 2010, the group continues to meet once a month at The Hotshoe Gallery in London. Tri-pod members will be exhibiting Nine-Point Perspective: Ways of Seeing at Hotshoe Gallery this August.

studioSTRIKE is a small and friendly creative space for emerging and established artists. It lives on the top floor of the Bread and Roses in Clapham, a former coach house now owned by the Workers Beer Company. The building takes its name from a line in a James Oppenheim poem, later sung by female textile workers on strike in Massachusetts 1912.

studioSTRIKE took over the disused top floor of the building in July 2010. It’s now a professional community of 15 artists from a variety of disciplines. Together they host and run events, live music, talks and screenings.

Filed under: Photographers, Photography Shows, Visual Artists, Women Photographers Tagged: Contact Editions, emerging photography, london, photography event, print sale, slide slam, studioSTRIKE., Tri-pod

New Video: Kristoffer Axen from reGeneration2

In this interview, Swedish photographer Kristoffer Axen explains the subject and process of his work which involves a lot of post-production. He touches on more specifically his At Sea At Night series, picturing a very “dark and claustrophobic” world inspired by painters and filmmakers.

reGeneration2: tomorrow’s photographers today exhibition and accompanying publication, is presented by Aperture Foundation from January 20 through March 17, 2011, in collaboration with the Musée de l’Elysée in Lausanne, Switzerland, and with the support of Pro Helvetia and the Consulate General of Switzerland in New York.

Following the worldwide critical acclaim of the book and exhibition reGeneration: 50 Photographers of Tomorrow in 2005, a breakthrough publication for artists such as Pieter Hugo or Nathalie Czech, Aperture Foundation and Musée de l’Élysée in Lausanne, Switzerland, have collaborated on a new edition. This second volume and exhibition–the broadest survey of its kind–features the works of eighty up-and-coming photographers selected from 120 of the world’s top photography schools.

As the digital revolution continues its relentless advance, it demolishes longstanding practices in every domain of the photographic field. reGeneration2 examine how the new generation of photographers operates, showcasing their inspiring creativity and ingenuity, and revealing the diversity of emerging photography.

Stay tuned for more video interviews with artists from this exhibition to be featured on the blog next week!

Click here to view and purchase the reGeneration2: tomorrow’s photographers today book

View the Aperture limited edition photographs by Kristoffer Axen and other reGeneration 2 artists here.

View previous interviews with curators William A. Ewing and Nathalie Herschdorferher and artist Geoffrey H. Short.

New Video: Geoffrey H. Short from reGeneration2

This is the first clip of a series of interviews with artists from reGeneration2: Tomorrow’s Photographers Today.

In this interview, New Zealand photographer Geoffrey H. Short explains the process and the spirit behind his explosions series, when the terror and the sublime meet. Short also touches on how the series developed in a different direction, and the importance of his participation to the reGeneration2 project for his career.

reGeneration2: tomorrow’s photographers today exhibition and accompanying publication, is presented by Aperture Foundation from January 20 through March 17, 2011, in collaboration with the Musée de l’Elysée in Lausanne, Switzerland, and with the support of Pro Helvetia and the Consulate General of Switzerland in New York.

Following the worldwide critical acclaim of the book and exhibition reGeneration: 50 Photographers of Tomorrow in 2005, a breakthrough publication for artists such as Pieter Hugo or Nathalie Czech, Aperture Foundation and Musée de l’Élysée in Lausanne, Switzerland, have collaborated on a new edition. This second volume and exhibition–the broadest survey of its kind–features the works of eighty up-and-coming photographers selected from 120 of the world’s top photography schools.

As the digital revolution continues its relentless advance, it demolishes longstanding practices in every domain of the photographic field. reGeneration2 examine how the new generation of photographers operates, showcasing their inspiring creativity and ingenuity, and revealing the diversity of emerging photography.

Click here to view our limited-edition print with Geoffrey H. Short and other reGeneration2 artists

Click here to view and purchase the reGeneration2: Tomorrow’s Photographers Today book